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    Please help.
    My Grandfather, AB A.J.Holland served on HMS Terrible during the 2nd Boer War in the battles in the relief of Ladysmith and also when the ship was active on the China Station in the Boxer Rebellion at the relief of Peking.
    I know that his duties in South Africa were based on transporting ships guns to Ladysmith. He was awarded the Queens South Africa Medal with R of L bar. I am custodian of the afore mentioned medal. The medal appears to be silver and is engraved around its circumference with his number, name and ship. The type face or font appears to be a different style compared to those medals I have viewed on other websites. I hope that it's the genuine item but how can I tell?
    Additionally, he served as part of a gun crew in the battles of the relief of Peking. However, I cannot find any information to show whether he was awarded or should have been awarded a China War Medal. I recently read a book about the activities of HMS Terrible during this time, written by the ships Master at Arms. In the book, my Grandfather is listed as being part of a crew responsible for the operation of a gun. It is only from this information that I ascertain his role in the Relief of Peking.
    My question is; Is there a member knowledgeable in the field of the 2nd Boer War/Boxer Rebellion that could point me in the right direction to check out these two points or help in finding further information?
    Please advise.
    Thank you in anticipation,
    John Holland
    john.holland40@me.com

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  1. Enhancing Your Collection

    It’s been a while since I have written and since we last talked I have moved my study and with it the Home Office into new surroundings; same address just a new and better location. This involved new cabinets and displays so it was a lengthy process. In addition to this I decided to retire from public service and the past six months has been spent attempting to wrap up my projects. Although to get them all completed would take another two years as new road connections through forests are limited by budget and in our country a short construction season. Still all has finally come to pass with a few more touches to the study and the unfinished work projects in the capable hands of my replacement I am free to do what I want to do with rest of my life.

    Reading the posts on the GMIC lately I noticed one by Robin talking about the addition of a new Crimea Medal, I’m still envious, and in addition to this the addition of a cigarette card of this medal featuring the same bar. I believe Mervyn mentioned that some members are adding cap badges and other insignia to their medals and medal groups. This is something I have been doing for some time now and I wanted to talk about this interesting augmentation to medal collections as well as other military collectables.

    Below is one drawer of medals where I have added the cap badges to the medals



    I find myself; or rather catch myself, boring family and friends with my collections and constant droning on about history and this battle and that battle and how the breakdown of diplomacy led to one conflict or another. Most of my medal collection is housed in shallow drawers and if there is one thing I’ve noticed is that the average person’s eyes will start to glaze over after the third, and if I’m lucky, the forth drawer of what is perceived as one medal or group of medals after another with little to no differences. In fact I too start to think that there is a certain monotony about a sizable collection of just about anything after a while. If you are at all like me this “monotony” somehow imparts a warm feeling of comfort and security, as does the knowledge that I am a student, of sorts, of history and how these artefacts are in concert with the events they commemorate.

    For most of us, we collect for ourselves and not for others, nor do we seek to garner praise for our efforts from the few upon whom we may bestow the honour of viewing our treasures. I suppose that is somewhat a joke in the average person’s opinion as many would think even an hour going over someone’s collection, their passion as it were, to be a total waste of time. However, they are simply members of the great unwashed masses so let’s not give them any more consideration here.

    I’ve seen several collections where the owner has framed their collection, breaking the medals up into specific themes or a grouping to one recipient. For the most part I really like this, however in my case; wall space is and always has been at a premium. Framed documents and larger photos have always taken precedence in allotting wall space so medals were placed in shallow drawers out of necessity as much as anything else.

    In this blog I am speaking more about additional items to enhance the experience for someone viewing a collection and even to make it more interesting for the collectors themselves. Some of those additional items could be the cigarette cards mentioned earlier which could be of a soldier in uniform as much as the particular medal. My Bahawalpur collection has a cigarette card featuring a soldier from that country in full uniform, which I think is quite interesting. In addition to this I have added a post card commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 1st Bahawalpur Regiment, 1834-1934, and their battle honours.

    Other additions to collectables, that comes to mind; could be the addition of nipple, or hammer protectors to a black powder rifle or musket, or an authentic muzzle plug for the same type of weapon. A small word of caution here; it might be best not to make the announcement around the water cooler, in the office, that you are awaiting a shipment of vintage nipple protectors. Nasty rumors could be forthcoming. Of course rifle slings either authentic or reproductions dresses up a rifle or musket quite nicely. A discussion on reproductions, “to use or not to use”, is a topic for another time.

    Examples of additional items for a musket are shown below. The nipple protector and muzzle plug are on an 1853 Enfield and the sling is an original on a Pattern 1842 Brunswick Rifle marked as belonging to the Royal Canadian Regiment (RCR).



    Swords too have accessories such as wrist straps and sword knots that can be added. Sadly my Japanese sword collection has no such accessories, yet, but who knows, perhaps in the future. The only one with any such strap is missing the all important knot.

    The British sword shown below, with original leather sword knot, is the Pattern 1895 Infantry Officer’s Sword displaying the cipher of King George V.



    As always I hope this short dissertation will give the reader pause to think about alternatives to simply adding yet another item to the collection and enhance the specimens you already have.

    Regards

    Brian





  2. INTRODUCTION

    When you live , or, work in an old town or city, it is easy to overlook historical buildings and
    landmarks.

    This happened when I was first posted to Bethnal Green Police Station. The area was a mixture -
    tall, ugly concrete blocks of flats - typical for the the late 1960's. Rows of old terraced houses
    and and tenement blocks - built-in the 1880's to try and improve the area and cover the shame
    and bad publicity that Jack the Ripper's murders had caused. There were also many small and medium sized factories and workshops.

    Walking - or, driving in a car on duty, it was easy to see just the people and the streets - however,
    once I was on night duty I had the opportunities to really see what made-up this 2000 year old
    area of continuous occupation. There will be other occasions when I will be able to go into detail -
    however, as an example, there was a short cross street between Brick Lane and Commercial Street
    named Fournier Street. Basically, it was a row of joined houses dating back to the 18th Century and
    in the style of the 17th Century. Most of them were derelict.

    During the time of King Charles 2nd - who was restored to the British Throne in 1660 - his French
    counterpart was the 'Sun King' - Louis X1V (14th). Following the urging of Cardinal Richelieu, he
    barred the Hugeonots - or, Protestants - from practising their Religion and they were forced to flee
    overseas. Many to Britain. My Mother's family name was Bozier - a Hugeonot descendent.

    The French silk weaving industry really depended on their skill, and when they left it fell into decline. Their loss was England's gain - the area the silk weavers chose to live was the same Fournier Street in London's East End. Many of the old houses have now been renovated and are
    shown as they used to be - workrooms on the ground floor - living accomodation above. There
    are several museums and it is an area worth a visit.

    General View of Fournier Street

    http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2013/blogentry-6209-0-88277600-1378482882.gifclick

    Inside of one of the houses - the marks on the beams were for silk weaving machines



    Map of the area - Sever's House is now restored for the public.




    THE MECHANICS OF A 1960'S POLICE STATION

    I can only talk about the running of a Police Station in the 1960's/70's. I would think little had
    changed over the previous 100 years - and, quite frankly, if a system works why keep making
    changes. This seem to be the prevailing attitude today - change for the sake of change - or,
    is it just me getting old ?

    'HB' or Bethnal Green Police Station, was not the Divisional Station - however, because of the large
    population in the district it had a complement of some 200 Police and civilian staff.

    The commander of the Station was a Chief Superintendent (equiv. to a Lt.Col. in the Army). He
    was assisted by a Superintendent.

    The CID (Criminal Investigation Department) numbered about 25/30 - under a Det. Inspector.

    There was a Process Dept., under an Inspector for dealing with Summonses. When you reported
    someone for an offence, the paperwork was reviewed in this Dept. to ensure there was enough
    evidence to go to Court. When you made a direct Arrest the Sergeant dealing with the Charge also, had the responsibility of ensuring that it was a legitimate arrest - with the evidence to prove
    the Act the arrest was made under.

    The Station also had a detachment of Special Constabulary - who at that time were only allowed
    2 hours duty a week. I remember one old Special who was an Estate Agent. When on duty he
    parked his Rolls Royce in a side street.

    We had a fully staffed canteen and after 8p.m. we had facilities in the sitting area to make tea
    and light meals.

    The uniformed Branch numbered some 120 men - split into 3 Divisions or, Reliefs. These were
    identified as 'A' "B' and 'C' Reliefs - each under an Inspector and two sergts.. The system was
    changed some time ago, however, the above had existed for very many years.

    A 9 week cycle was followed. Early Turn was 6 a.m. to 2 p.m.. Late Turn was 2p.m. to 10 p.m.
    and Night Duty - 10 p.m. to 6 a.m.. You did 6 weeks of alternate Early and Late Turn and then
    3 weeks continuous Night Duty.

    You paraded 15 minutes early to be told what was happening, receive special duties and who was wanted. You also Paraded Appointments . This was to show you had your whistle, truncheon and report books.

    You have to remember that Police are a disciplined Force and subject to the Rules laid down by
    Parliament and your Commissioner or, Chief Constable. For example - you don't decide which variation of uniform you will wear - Dress of the Day is shown in Force Orders.
    With holidays, sickness, time off and Court appearances the Relief rarely paraded more than twenty men - and sometimes much lower. Just meant we worked harder.

    Hopefully, this brief outline will give you an idea of the set-up. With so many people with-in the Station you really worked with your own Relief - and the men on the other shifts. I was on 'B' Relief. Being so dependent on your colleagues for help in an emergency, you tended to become close friends - on and off duty. Although, as often happens you tended to have your own group.

    When I finished learning Beats with Jock, my Relief was about to start on 3 weeks of Nights. This
    meant I would be Patrolling my assigned area - or, Beat - on my own. Being the East End, away from main roads the back streets were poorly lit.

    Let me say right now - you don't know the meaning of ' Being on your Own ' until you have
    patrolled for the first time at night - and on a freezing February night....

    Radios had only recently been introduced - and we did not have enough to go around. I'm fairly
    sure that friends I had made, had ensured I had one that first night. They were Swedish Stornos
    and quite powerful. The unit went in your back left pocket and the microphone was fed up to
    your tunic or, greatcoat lapel. You could hear all station calls and if you wanted to speak you
    pressed a button on the top. Messages went to our Reserve Room or, Communications Room. This
    was manned by two PC's and an elderley , retired PC, manned the switchboard.

    We were supposed to return by midnight for refreshments - but, in the dark back streets I got
    hopelessly lost. It got to about 12.30a.m. and I knew I was a long way from the Station and knew
    that people would be wondering where I was. I didn't want to use the radio - I knew I would
    never hear the last of getting lost..........

    The decision was made for me - I was looking in my A-Z wondering where the 'hell' I was, when
    4 drunk yobos found me !

    They were very cautious at first - then got 'cheeky'. I wasn't nervous of them - perhaps a little
    intimidated. There were 4 of them and I only stood 5' 8". I decided that I'd better call in for
    directions - doing so, it slipped out that I was having a little trouble.

    Before I could turn round 5 Police cars and the van - plus some 20 police had arrived to see "what I
    was 'up to' " The whole canteen had turned out. Very embarrasing - but I knew then that I had
    friends.

    The yobs got a quick lesson in having respect for their local Police - and I got lots of different
    lectures in letting people give assistance when it is needed.

    I learned a lot from that incident - and of course - with time and experience you become a more
    confident person. However, like all of the Services - Military and Civilian - you have to learn that you are part of a team.

    Next time - a few more incidents. Some years ago I was asked to write for a local Radio Station,
    some humerous memories. Having recently found them in the move from the shop, I will add one
    to each future post.

    HUMOUR IN UNIFORM

    One of the duties of a London Policeman is Reserve Duty. This is where , once in a while, you
    man the communications room and make sure that there are always a few uniformed men around the Station.

    One quiet Sunday afternoon I had 'pulled' this duty and was thankful as it was a cold, wet afternoon in winter. About 3 p.m. the Duty Sgt. called me into the Front Office, where there were two men who
    were covered in mud. They said that in the morning they had been clearing a site (they were building workers) and had found two large iron objects. Thinking to sell them for scrap they had loaded them onto their open flatbed lorry. When they had gone for a drink someone said they looked like bombs and to bring them to the Police.

    Needless to say I was very grateful !! One look told me that they appeared to be large shells or, even bombs without fins. Beating a retreat wouldn't have helped - if they had gone-up so
    would half the East End of London - I tried Bribery ! Take them to Commercial Street police station I said - they won't take so long to deal with them !! Not likely - they wern't moving an inch
    and expected me to deal with them. Eventually we managed to get them into a corner of the station yard and covered them with sandbags - the London Police have always been good at immediate action to to re-assure the public !

    The 'bloody' workmen left and we had to evacuate the Station and the surrounding area until the
    bomb squad came to take them away.

    YES ! They were live and very unstable - had to be detonated in a nearby park. They were 1st
    World War 8 inch Naval shells. Heaven alone knows what thay were doing in the East End of London ?

    A couple of years ago - in Durban, I was asked to value and identify a deceased estate with militaria. The friend who was with me spotted a mortar bomb and picked it up - ' look', he said
    'it's a Chinese one. Oh my God, it's live with it's detonator and it's sweating '.
    We retreated very quickly and the SAP bomb squad had to detonate it. Please, please - no-one bring me any more shells or, bombs.












  3. Earlier today (5-25-13) I attended the Ft. Lee Military Show for the first time. I had a blast… great show, wonderful location; altogether a very worthy effort by the organizers. I’ll certainly go again next year, and I’ll probably have a table of my own then as well.

    I primarily went to hook up with two good friends, Kevin Born (one of the show’s organizers- thanks Kevin!) and Ralph Pickard (author of “Stasi Decorations and Memorabilia, Volumes 1 and 2”), as it has been a couple of years since I saw them last. A wonderful reunion ensued, along with some minor buying and selling on my part. Great way to spend a beautiful Saturday morning and early afternoon.

    Insofar as content, most of the vendors dealt in artifacts from multiple countries and the country that had the most items on display/for sale was the US. Wars covered began with WW1, although I did see reunion items from the US Civil War. There were a couple of US vendors who also had a smattering of Third Reich items, and a couple who also had Eastern Bloc awards. Kevin and Ralph’s tables were the only tables displaying East German militaria.
    The highlight of the day was Ralph’s sharing two unbelievable groupings he has acquired… and when I say “unbelievable”, well, you can certainly take that to the bank. The first group is that of a Hungarian State Security agent who retired a Colonel in the mid ‘70’s. In this group, Ralph has been able to acquire this gentleman’s awards from his own country, which include awards from both the Rakosi and Kadar periods and the documents that go with them; Bulgarian awards and associated documents; East German MfS (“Stasi”) awards and their documents; Soviet awards and their documents including the highly coveted “Outstanding Member of the MOOP” (in absolutely pristine condition) and KGB 50 Year award badge. Also with this group, is a Hungarian classified award document that, by virtue of it not having a copy distribution number, may be the sole copy of that particular document, and an interesting pass that admitted this gentleman to all secure areas in the event of an emergency- a sort of “get out of jail free” pass. There were other documents, such as his retirement document, as well. Suffice it to say I have never seen a grouping so impressive and so complete… then Ralph showed me the next case.

    This next group was that of an Armenian KGB agent (rose to Lt. Colonel) who was posted, for obviously a good little while, in Afghanistan. 24 awards with documents (for all but, I believe, 2 of the awards), including the Soviet Order of Personal Courage, Soviet Order of the Red Star, Afghan Orders of the Red Star (2), Afghan Order of Glory, Afghan Orders of the Star (1st and 3rd Class) and Afghan Medal for Valour… this guy saw more than his fair share of action. I have never this many Afghan awards in one place, let alone with nearly all the documents TO ONE INDIVIDUAL. I know that Ralph took a lot of time (and money) to get these groups together so completely and they really are beyond amazing. Such collections allow you to go past the individual medal, as impressive and desirable as it may be, and actually get an insight into the life and career of the individual who achieved these awards. Genuine history. And, what probably goes without saying is my appreciation to Ralph for sharing this with me. Strike two from the “bucket list”.

    A great day.

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    Hello altogether,
    i look for the user "douglynn". He was here at last three years ago. If anyone know him or is able to contact him please refer to this blog.

    Thank you very much!

    best regards
    ma_rie_rudz

  4. Joan, whom I have worked with for more years than I care to think of, is in hospital seriously ill with cancer and a heart attack. Your thoughts and prayers would be appreciated.

    Over the years I have helped Joan research her family's military history. Her father was one of the Canadians who joined the R.A.F. in 1938. He ended up with 42 Squadron R.A.F. flying Beauforts, along with a compatriot Oliver Philpot. Both were shot down and both ended up in Stalag Luft III. Philpot was to escape with Eric Williams and Michael Codner in the wooden horse escape. Her uncle was killed October 13, 1941 with 58 Squadron R.A.F. on return from a raid on Nurenburg.

    A great uncle 464662 Pte.James Frederick Burns was killed October 26, 1917 with the 47th Bn. C.E.F. and is buried in Passchendaele New British Cemetery.




    I'm hoping Joan will pull through.

    Update April 29 - Joan died today. .

    Rest in peace, Joan


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    Reyes
    Latest Entry

    Gentlemen -- I have a Waterloo Medal that I wish to determine the authenticity of. The medal was given to me by an uncle who fought in Germany in WWII. Until a couple of months ago I thought it was just some commemorative coin of little value. After doing a little research I have reason to believe that it may be an autheWaterloo Medal June 18, 1815.pdfntic Waterloo Medal.

    In an attempt to authenticate it, three months ago I sent the Royal Mint Museum pictures of the medal (see attached images) requesting verification of the name encrypted on it in the museum's original Waterloo Roll Call. A day after I sent the request I received a standard reply stating that one of their team members would be in touch with me shortly -- a month ago I sent a second request asking for the status of my original inquiry but the museum did not reply.

    The name engraved on the outer edge of the medal is Richard Smith, 2nd BATT, 73rd REG, FOOT.

    Could you please tell me if there is another way(s) to authenticate the medal?

    Sincerely,

    Sgt. USMC Retired

    Waterloo Medal June 18, 1815.pdf

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    blog-0443697001362839212.png

    I have a box of 9 WW II pull switches - in original tin with the original instructions, 7 still in original wrapping - found in an old building I purchased. Wanting to sell but don't know best way or forum anybody interested? or know a good outlet, and does anybody have any idea of value?

  5. TacHel
    Latest Entry

    Lost my step father of 40+ years this morning following a battle with cancer. He'll be terribly missed...

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    Hi Gents,

    I have been searching for some time to locate a clean WW2 Iron Cross Class 1, hopefully in original case and marked. Pin or screwback is fine.
    The problem appears to be that there are 1000's scattered over the Internet and as I wish to avoid buying a lemon, was hoping that a member maybe able to assist in some way ?

    I am not stuck on a specific LOD, but any help on where I should be looking and realistically expected to pay would be really appreciated.

    My grandfather was in the German forces serving with the 'Afrika Korps' and sadly perished during the conflict in the early 1940's. My little boy is now fascinated with the history of WW2 and I am hoping to locate the right medal that can stay in the family for future generations.

    In anticipation of any assistance
    Regards
    Marco
    :unsure:

  6. gallery_14912_305_78117.jpg

    Old artprints I found at a fleemarket. Enjoy

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    tigerslord
    Latest Entry

    Dear All

    I am Grand son of Muhammad Ismail Khan who served as RDF in Kachhawa Horse in 19 30 / 40.I need photos of Kachhawa Horse unit.
    I am very thankful to you all for support

    My Email is: ahmed.khan313@yahoo.com

    Regards

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    Robert A
    Latest Entry
    blog-0892074001355900437.jpeg

    Hi every one, I have a question, there are conflicting information on the net regarding the French Import mark of swan for objects containing silver. Online encyclopedias mention it came into existence in 1893 and was in use till mid 1960's, in this web site some mention it came into existence in 1864 and was in use till 1892-93, can someone please enlighten me as to the actual date it came into use and when did it stopped being used by the French authorities. Many thanks for any help you can forward me.

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    Surreyroamer
    Latest Entry
    blog-0901189001353763767.jpg

    Anyone reconise this?

  7. Chris Boonzaier
    Latest Entry

    Kaiserscross.com topped 16 000 visits for the month of October !

    Only 2 000 were me!

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    blogentry-14469-0-39597000-1351657013_th Members might be interested in a new book, called MOOROSI: A South African king's battle for survival that I have written and which has just been published. It tells the detailed story of a little-known, but intriguing, war that took place in southern Lesotho (then Basutoland) in 1879 between the Cape Colony and the BaPhuthi people, led by King Moorosi. The war was followed by the Basotho War, or the Gun War, which began a year later. MOOROSI also includes descriptions of other wars that took place on the Eastern Cape border of the Cape Colony in 1877 and 1878.

    The book describes how the Moorosi war arose from conflict between the Cape Colony and the BaPhuthi people, leading to the siege of Mount Moorosi, a flat-topped mountain fortress surrounded by steep cliffs on three sides. The accessible fourth side was fortified with stone walls and guarded by the heavily-armed BaPhuthi people, who built a village on the mountaintop. The assault on Mount Moorosi presented a challenge in military strategy to the colonial forces who found it more formidable than they had ever thought it would be. Three colonial soldiers won the Victoria Cross for their actions during the war; how they won them is told in detail in the book.

    Although the book is categorized as historical fiction, almost all the story is true and represents the results of seven years of research during which I consulted rare books and government documents from the time of the war, spent many hours in archives in South Africa and Lesotho, and visited the historical sites around which the action takes place.

    I was born and raised in South Africa. My interest in cultural conflict, colonial Africa and the Moorosi battle in particular began when I traveled through Lesotho on horseback in my early 20s and when I subsequently worked as a journalist at several South African newspapers and news magazines, covering cultural conflict in Southern Africa during the apartheid years.

    While studying as a journalism student at Columbia University in the mid-60s, I not only wrote a thesis on cultural conflict but also attended lectures and wrote papers relating to the Vietnam War, which directly affected many of my fellow students. After moving to the United States in 1980, I studied conflict around the world, including the two wars in which the United States has recently been involved, while working as a journalist in the Seattle area.

    I believe MOOROSI is an excellent case study in war, mirroring many of the issues that we see in today's conflicts around the world.

    The book is accompanied by pictures illustrating the events before and during the war. Please see: http://www.moorosi.com

    MOOROSI is listed on the amazon website at: http://www.amazon.co...351655372&sr=8- where it is available in print and Kindle editions.

  8. who has information about german military activities in 1. world war in finland about 2. MG-Company and leutnant Otto Waischwillat?

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    Doing research on Major John Francis Purcell (Cape Mounted Rifles) I discovered that you have been contacted
    by his grandson. I have in my possession family letters, photographs, and other personal ephemera which I feel
    should go back to the family. Unfortunately I only discovered your web site today and have already put these items
    on Ebay. I hope there is a way that he can view these items.

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    blog-0964255001351276326.jpg

    Hi,
    I have in my possession a half pint pewter mug given to my grandfather. It is engraved with the words: Branscombe contingent H. Hansford 1914-1919.
    It appears that these mugs were given to the men of Branscombe village, devon when they returned from the war. They were also given to the families of those that didn't return.
    If anyone knows anything about these mugs or has seen one please contact me.

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    pmuehleis
    Latest Entry

    Being new to this site please excuse for anything that may be repetitive. I have some clarification concerning Reinhold Ritter von Benz. As a member and later leader of Jasta 78b his military career started in the infantry. I have seen some posts which suggest his (Blue Max ) Maximillian Joseph Orden was awarded posthumously. In fact it was awarded on Sep. 28,1915 as Leutnant 17. Bayerische Infanrieregiment. This after already receiving the Military Merit Order of Bavaria. Due to serious wounds he was unable to continue service in the infantry. Later he joined the air wing of Jasta 78b. One of his early planes was an Albatross then later a Fokker D VII Nr. 4461/18. This is the aircraft in which he was shot down and killed on Aug 13,1918, near Vaxainville, France.
    He was buried in the military cemetery at Reillon, France. There is some suggestion on various internet sites that a Fokker D VII with a "K" inside a white star is that of Karl Kallmunzer. This unfortunately for all you model enthusiasts is incorrect. Karl Kallmunzer was indeed a member of Jasta 78b and he did have a "K" on his plane but but it was on an Albatross and it was in a circle. He was in fact shot down in that same plane. You may ask why someone with the name Benz would have a "K" on his plane. This is information only his family would know and therefore the confusion. The "K" on Benz's plane was actually for his girlfriend Katie.
    How do I know ? He was my grand uncle and his papers and photos are now all in my possession. I have 4 photos taken during different times of him and his plane, a group photo of him with the rest of Jasta 78b as well as several documents of his death , and burial.
    I hope this helps. I know some of you have been looking for more info on Jasta 78b.

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    My great-grandfather is Lukas Kirsten. His daughter is Marianne v. Watzdorf-Kirsten, my grandmother. His grand daughter, Angela Schroeder, is my mother. My name is Alexandra Kennedy Corwin.

    I have photos/documents left to me in albums. I have his sword.

    If anyone knows of medals and so forth linked to him or know of descendants, please let me know. When my grandmother migrated to the US in the 60s, she left Germany behind. I do not know of any other family.

    here is Lukas Kirsten's information:

    LukasKirsten: born 21 May 1874 Crimmitschau, killed in action 10 December 1917 near Warneton,

    Saxon cavalry officer, participant in China Campaign 1900-01 and Southwest Africa 1904-06

    Sekondeleutnant
    Oberleutnant 28.6.99 C
    Rittmeister 15.9.05
    Major zD

    Went to zD status from Ulanen Rgt 21 19 January 1914. Recalled for WW1 and served in infantry units as a battalion and regimental commander, being KIA as commander of Saxon Inf Rgt 177.

    Received the Saxon St Henry Order-Knight for China 19.1.1901, as well as Prussian Crown Order 4X and Austro-Hungarian Military Merit Cross 3 with War Decoration and Japanese Order of the Rising Sun 6th Class. He may have received his Italian Order of Saints Maurice and Lazarus-Knight for China.

    In Southwest Africa he received Saxon Merit Order-Knight w/Xs and Prussian Red Eagle Order 4 w/Xs.

    Until 1914: Saxon XXV Years Long Service Cross

    WWI: both classes of Prussian Iron Cross, Swords to Saxon Albert Order-Knight 1st 19.10.15 (when he got a Knight 1st WITHOUT swords—must have been before the war started in 1914) and Crown to that grade 27.6.16. Turkish Imtiaz Medal in Silver with Sabers Bar was apparently a “courtesy” award from a visiting Ottoman Pasha.

    Commander grade of the Saxon Order of Saint Henry 12 October 1916 as commander of Saxon Infantry Regiment 103.

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    I have a group of medals to a Trooper Churchill of the 2nd King Edwards Horse, one of the medals is a privatly awarded medal, which I assume is from the Regiment as the ribbon is their colours. The inscription on the medals reads for bravery in the Field in Irland the other 2 medals are the war and Victory medals to Sgt. Churchill. I have been able with some help from a friend to possibly put him in Dublin during the Easter Rising but can find no real mention of his name.
    Can anyone help with any information please.

  9. Dr Thomas Coutts Morison MRCSE LAC JP, son of Sir Alexander Morison, volunteered to serve as a civilian Staff-Surgeon during the Crimean War. He died unmarried in 1863 in Rockhampton in the Colony of Queensland (Australia), and apparently among his possessions when he died was a Crimean War period Order of the Medjidie. I'm looking for some information on this from the people that really know the Medjidie.

    Morison’s insignia is a silver star comprising seven triple quills with seven small crescents and five-pointed stars between them, the whole measuring 43 mm in diameter (one of the tips has been broken off). Is there any way to distinguish a 4th Class insignia from a 5th Class, just from the star?


    The gold central disc bears the Sultan’s tughra, the Royal Cipher of the Ottoman Sultan Abdülmecid I, after whom the Order is named. Around this is a gold-bordered circle of red enamel bearing the words in Arabic script for “Devotion”, “Loyalty” and “Truth” and the Islamic year 1268 AH (1852) on four red enamel plaques. There is a suspension loop present, fitted at the rear, but the entire central disc is out of position by 90º clockwise. Is this unusual, or likely to be a fault in the assembly of the original medal?

    This insignia lacks the typical suspension (a red-enamelled crescent and star suspender with green enamelled edges); this has been removed and the star instead has a horizontal brooch mount on the reverse. The reverse bears a fitted concave silver disc which is engraved to: “Thomas Coutts Morison Staff Surgeon P.M.O. Sultan’s Coʃsacks”, which I think reflects the writing style of the day.

    Any comments or feedback would be greatly appreciated.
    Paul

  10. Over on another forum, the cry usually goes up three weeks before the actual date of the medal auction: "The catalogue is online!"

    The first thing one does, if one happens to live in Canada, is check the five-hour time difference between here and the UK, to make sure that most of the British collectors are safely in bed and won't be using up all the website's bandwidth.

    Then the apprehension starts: What will they have up this time? Will there be anything for me on there? What if there's *too much* for me on there this time? Do I have enough money in the Fund to pick up something shiny?

    I open the search function on the catalogue and enter my terms. Then I click and wait. The list of items within my interests shows up and I start scrolling down. That's nice; so is that ... then one particular listing catches my eye.

    I know those medals. I've seen them before. Not just once, but twice, offered for sale from various medal dealers. Every time I've gotten the money together to snag them, they end up being sold, only to reappear a few months later in another shop window. The price, oddly enough, has stayed somewhat constant, allowing for time, inflation, and expenses.

    There's nothing wrong with the set, or so I think. Those medals which are named are named properly. Those which aren't are authentic. The pictures all appear to be of the same medals, just taken in different environments, showing the whims of the individuals to photograph them in their own way. The dealers are reputable, as is the auction house.

    I've got a canny bid in on this set and would like to win it. But even if I don't, I have a feeling I'll be seeing them again shortly...

    But why do they keep coming back?

    I've seen this happen before, with Rex Cosh's set of 10. They went through two or three auction houses and a dealer before I snagged them. I've seen it with some other sets. One dealer sells to another, who sells the set. Then they appear a year or two later on E-bay, only to wind up across the pond in the UK, for sale again from yet another dealer, now all nicely mounted together rather than loose.

    What keeps some sets in the purgatory of cycling around and around?