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  1. Notice Board & Highlighted New Areas

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  2. Great Britain & Commonwealth Realms

    1. Great Britain: Orders, Gallantry, Campaign Medals

      For Discussions on all aspects of British Civic Orders, Gallantry Awards, Military Campaign Medals, Long Service and Jubilee Medals (not specifically covered in Colonial or Commonwealth Sections) of the United Kingdom of Great Britain

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    2. Great Britain: Militaria: Badges, Uniforms & Equipment

      For Discussions relating to all aspects of British Militaria including: Swords, Firearms, Badges, Insignia, Uniforms, Headgear, & Equipment.

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    3. Great Britain: Research, Documentation & History

      For topics relating to researched medal groups, research of British/Colonial servicemen & women or items of historical military interest.

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    4. Great Britain: Mervyn Mitton's British & Colonial Police Forces

      Forum dedicated to the memory of Mervyn Mitton relating to the history of the British Police & Fire Services. It includes the many Colonial Police Forces of the Empire & Commonwealth.

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    5. Great Britain: Empire: Colonial Including South Africa & India: Awards, Militaria & History

      Medals, Awards, Badges, Research, Militaria and History of the Empire to include wars & campaigns in colonies that were part of the British Empire such as South Africa India & Hong Kong

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    6. Commonwealth Realms: Canada, New Zealand & Australia Medals & Militaria

      For discussions relating to Medals, Awards, Uniform, Equipment & History of Canada, New Zealand & Australia

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  3. Germany:

    1. Deutsche Kaiserreich: Man spricht Denglish

      Deutsch sprechendes Forum. Während aller Zeiträume der deutschen Militärgeschichte.

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    2. Germany: All Eras: Signature Database

      Post images of signatures that you own so we can start a comprehensive database of German official signatures from all eras.

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    3. Germany: All Eras: The Iron Cross

      All Classes of Iron Cross awarded 1815 to 1945

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    4. Germany: Imperial: The Orders, Decorations and Medals of The Imperial German States

      This section if for comprehensive discussion on the Awards and Decorations of the Imperial German States.

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    5. Germany: Imperial: Rick (Research) Lundstrom Forum for Documentation and Photographs

      Forum established in memory of Rick (Research) Lundstrom 1956-2013 : Imperial German historical research, documentation and photographs

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    6. Germany: Imperial Uniforms, Headwear, Insignia & Personal Equipment

      Uniforms, Helmets, Headwear, Insignia, Weapons, & Personal Equipment.

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    7. Germany: Weimar Republic & Deutsche Freikorps

      Militaria & History of the Deutsches Reich 1919 to 1933

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    9. Germany: Third Reich: Uniforms, Headwear, Insignia & Equipment

      Third Reich Uniforms, Helmets, Headwear, Insignia, Weapons, Belt Buckles & Personal Equipment.

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    11. Germany: Third Reich: Research, Documentation & Photographs

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    12. Germany: Post 1945: Bundesrepublik & DDR

      West Germany BDR, East Germany DDR & Reunification Bundesrepublik

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  4. Russia

    1. Russia: Imperial

      For all Militaria, Medals & Decorations relating to the Imperial Russian Court

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    2. Russia: Soviet Orders, Medals & Decorations

      For all Orders, Medals & Decorations relating to the United Soviet Socialist Republic Союз Советских Социалистических Республик (CCCP)

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      For all Militaria, Uniforms, Headgear & Equipment relating to the Soviet Union.

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    4. Russian Federation

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  5. European States

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    4. Austro-Hungarian Empire

      For all Militaria, Orders, Medals & Decorations relating to Austria-Hungary 1867 to 1918

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    5. France

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  6. Rest of the World: Medals & Militaria

    1. Africa

      Awards and Medals of the African Nations. Medals directly relating to Colonial Powers should be posted in the relevant country i.e. Great Britain or France etc

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    9. United States of America

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    10. Rest of the World: Militaria & History

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  7. Military History by Period

    1. Napoleonic Wars

      For discussion on all aspects of the period between 1750-1815 including the Seven Years War, American War of Independence, Napoleonic Wars and War of 1812.

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    2. The Great War 1914 to 1918

      For discussions relating to the military history of The Great War.

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    3. World War II 1939 to 1945

      For discussions relating to the history of The Second World War.

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    4. Modern Campaigns and Conflicts

      For discussions relating to Post WWII Conflict and War. Including Korea, Vietnam, Malaya, Oman, The Balkans and Northern Ireland. It includes current ongoing Conflicts and War Zones. i.e. Iraq & Afghanastan.

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  8. Special Interest Section

    1. Document Archive Support

      Discussion links to articles and files uploaded

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    3. Inter-Allied Victory Medals of the Great War

      Victory Medals of the allied countries of World War I

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    4. Fascism In Europe 1919 to 1945: Badges, Uniforms & Regalia

      For apolitical discussion relating to the badges uniforms and regalia of the various Fascist Parties and Organisations that existed during the first half of the 20th Century. It includes Italy, Spain and National Socialist Parties operating in German Occupied Territories.

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    5. Masonic Medals & Jewels

      For discussions relating to Masonic Medals & Jewels.

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    6. Preservation & Restoration of Military Artifacts

      Need to know the correct way to preserve or restore items in your collection. Look no further.

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    7. Coins & Commemorative Medallions

      This section is for the subject of MILITARY related coins and medallions.

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    8. Military Art

      Discussions for the artistic amongst us. Covers paintings, drawing, photography and modelling.

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    9. Non Military Collectibles & Antiques

      What else do you collect?

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  9. Members Area

    1. GMIC Competition Forum

      This section is for Competitions for Members Only

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    2. Members Valuation and Identification Forum

      Require a peer evaluation? Also post your unidentified medals and militaria here.

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    3. Books & Films

      Read a good book, seen a good film? Review and recommend books & films.

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    4. Places to Visit

      Military Collectors Shows, Museums, Battlefields and Bunkers.

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  • Posts

    • My Collection of 1870 NCEK2 CDV's
      Nice one. There is a list of EKNK awardees, but not enough to go on.
    • Kingdom Yugoslavia marine officer with unknown medal
      May well have been in the merchant fleet prior to the great war. Paul
    • Kaisar-i-Hind Medal
      Frank, The gold Kaisar-i-Hind is 18 carat gold (.750). The silver is as you say.925. All the best, Paul  
    • My humble collection - second start
      Hi all, I haven't been around a long time because I gave up collecting and sold piece by piece my whole previous collection during 3 years back in college. But now I am graduated, started new career and also I am back in collecting from the scratch.  I will start posting here new items that I have managed to pick up. Any questions, extra information, research ideas, etc, please do not hesitate to contact me! Thanks for looking, Timo aka Noor   William John Winn (1877 – XXXX)
      9511, Drummer, 5th Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers   -    QSA (1st Drgn.Gds.) - Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, SA 1901, SA 1902
      -    Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal George V issue, 1st type 1911-1920 (9511 Corpl. W. Winn R.Dub.Fus)
      -    Army Meritorious Service Medal George VI issue 'Fid.Def' obverse (9511 Sjt. W.J Winn R.Dub.F.) William was born in Hertfordshire at 1877 and he enlisted age 16 years and 6 months from Norwich 29th March 1894 into 1st Dragoon Guards. Private Winn service number was 3760. He stated his trade as a musician. William’s was 5 feet 3 inches high and he weight 119 lbs. He had brown eyes and brown hair. During his service met with Barbara Evans and they got married at Colchester on the 16th April 1898. William served in UK until 15th January 1901, when he was sent to the South African war. He stayed in there until 14th November 1903 and became entitled Queens South Africa Medal with the following clasps: Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, SA 1901, SA 1902. His service continued in home. On the 8th May 1905 their son Cyril Francis Winn born. Following year, on the 28th March 1906 he discharged after 12 years of service. Almost immediately he enlisted on the 4 May 1906 to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He was promoted to the rank Corporal on the 4th November 1911. Irish Census 1911 shows his family living in Beggars Bush Barracks in Dublin. Also this source shows one of the sad moment from his family life – as stated on the service papers, he had a son Cyril Francis but on the census form there is a remark that they had two children and only one is living. He received Long Service & Good Conduct medal on the 28 June 1912. Then next promotion to the rank Sergeant took place on the 9th August 1914. Finally on the 19th December 1918 he was elected under army order to receive Army pension while still serving (AO/1 of 1918). In total he served around 22 years. His rank is mentioned on the roll as a “Trumpeter Major”, so must likely he served whole time as a musician. Joseph Connell (1875 – XXXX)
      6145, Private, 4 Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers Joseph was born in St.Thomas Parish in Dublin at 1875. He enlisted to the 4th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers at the 21st June 1908. At that time he was already circa 33 years old.
      Before Joseph was sent to the war, his name appears in the Police Gazette 19 January 1915 as a deserter in Sittingbourne from his unit at the 16 January 1915. Most likely this took place on the way to Western front. He landed in France 10 February 1915. During his service in France, some moment he was transferred into the Labour Corps. His new service number was 51331.
      After the Great War Connell became entitled 15 Star trio. 6145 Pte J.Connell 4 R Dub Fus Awarded Special Reserve LS Medal AO Oct 1913. so not sure how he appears on a Militia LS Medal with EDV11 obverse. By 1913 I would think it should be GV obverse. Most likely this award on the picture was “own awarded” replacement. Naming is engraved and not stamped like it should be on the official medal. John Behan (1893 – 25.05.2015)
      8710, Private, 4th Battalion Att to 2nd Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers John was born in Harold’s Cross, Dublin as a son of Martin and Maria Behan. Based on the 1911 Irish Census their family lived in Limekiln Lane, Rathmines/Rathgar. He had two brothers and two sisters. At this time John was Grocers Porter.
      Some moment around summer 1912 he enlisted to the 4th Battalion of Royal Dublin Fusiliers. At this time this was City of Dublin Militia unit and didn’t require full time service. His service number was 8710.
      When the Great War started, only 2nd Battalion from the Royal Dublin Fusiliers took part heavy fighting in France from 1914. They lost many men during the retreat as a POWs and also battle casualties were heavy. In order to compensate their losses, drafts from the militia units were sent in and attached to the front line units. Private John Behan was attached to the 2nd Battalion and landed in France on the 3rd May 1915. At that time his unit was in the Ypres Salient. Located half-a-mile north of Wieltje, originally a moated farm with outbuildings. It was first given the name 'Shell Trap Farm' by the British. The unhappy associations of this designation were held to be detrimental to the garrison's morale and the position was subsequently re-named by the Staff as 'Mouse Trap Farm'. 
      On the morning of the attack on 24 May 1915 what was left of the farm after the bombardment ('a mere heap of mud and rubbish') was defended by two platoons of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers; being a mere 30 yards from the enemy trenches the rapid occupation of the farm by the quick-moving German infantry was little short of inevitable. The Royal Dublin Fusiliers started the day at Ypres on 24th May, 1915 with 666 men - by the end of the day they had lost 645 men, of whom 149 were listed dead. 
      At 2:45 am the Germans launched a gas attack on the Allied lines which was the first time that the Germans had used poison gas on a large scale on the Western Front. The German poison gas came ‘drifting down wind in a solid bank some three miles in length and forty feet in depth, bleaching the grass, blighting the trees and leaving a broad scar of destruction behind it.’ By 9:30 pm, out of a battalion strength of 666 men, all that remained when the battalion ‘retired’ was one officer and twenty other ranks. For the record, in just eighteen and three quarter hours, the Dublin Fusiliers had suffered a loss of 645 men who were blown to bits, gassed, or driven insane by the effects of poisonous gas. The British at that time had no defences against gas attack, indeed the large-scale use of gas by the Germans on the Western Front had begun at Second Ypres. The 2nd Dublins Commanding Officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Loveband of Naas, died the following day. The Battalion did not take part in any more major battles for the rest of the year.
      John Behan was one of the men who got gassed. He was evacuated to the No.3 Gas Casualty Clearing Station but died day later on the 25 May 1915 age 22. He is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension (Nord). 
      Engraved on Menin Gate Memorial are the names of 461 Royal Dublin Fusiliers killed during the Battles of Ypres. 143 of them are the names of Dublin Fusiliers belonging to the 2nd Battalion who died on the 24th of May 1915. John O’Brien (1882 – XXXX)
      5764, Private, 4th Battalion
      City of Dublin Militia, Royal Dublin Fusiliers Because commonality of his name in Ireland, it is impossible to narrow him down, even using information from his service papers. 
      It is possible to say only that John was born around 1882 in St.Mary’s parish in Dublin.
      He became regular labourer and he lived in 9 Denmark Road, Dublin. On the 18th February 1902 at age 20 he put forward an application to become Militia soldier with the City of Dublin Militia – 4th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
      Based on the medical examination John O’Brien was 5 feet and 3 ½ inches tall. He weight 112 lbs. His eyes were grey and hair dark brown. Obviously he was Roman Catholic.
      He was attached to the battalion and already on the 10 March 1902 he embarked to the war in South Africa. He arrived to there on the 27th March 1902.
      During this phase of the war a larger scale battles were over and units were manning blockhouses in order to restrict the movement of the Boer guerrillas. This phase of the war also saw the use of mounted infantry companies and among them was the Dublin Fusiliers Mounted Infantry unit, which hunted down small groups of Boers, including the hunt for the prominent Boer officer, Christian De Wet.
      The conflict ended when the last of the Boers surrendered in May 1902 followed by the Treaty of Vereeniging.  During the war, volunteers from the three militia battalions of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers had been used to provide reinforcements for the two regular battalions fighting in South Africa. 
      Private O’Brien served in South Africa until 3rd October 1902 when he embarked back home. For his service, he received Queen South Africa medal with the clasps “South Africa 1902”, “Orange Free State” and “Cape Colony”. Also he received South Africa war gratitude £5.
      After the war John O’Brien worked for Mr. Johnston from 102 Capel Street, Dublin. 
      But looks like John wanted to become a full time regular soldier. He volunteered for a service to the Royal Irish Fusiliers on the 2nd February. His employer gave a good reference and also militia papers are stating that his character was good.  James Gaffney (1868 – xxxx)
      3251, Private, 5th (County of Dublin Militia) Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers James was born in Dublin c. 1868 in St. Paul’s parish in Dublin. He lived in 139 Kings Street.
      James Gaffney enlisted on the 27th May 1895 into Royal Dublin Fusiliers 5th Battalion (County of Dublin Militia). He was at that time 27 years old. Medical examination sheet describes him 5 feet and 8 ¾ inches tall, brown hair and blue eyes. 
      He attended following years for annual training and was sent to militia reserve 24 June 1898. He re-engaged for militia service again.
      When the Boer war started, he was embarked to South Africa on the 5th December 1899. He arrived 14 February 1900 and served in there until 25th February 1902.
      James was finally discharged 26th May 1903.
      Unfortunately I haven’t had luck to locate any extra information about him.
      On his papers there is a note that 1904 his address was 11 Healys Cottages, Francis Street, Dublin. J.Hoskins (xxxx – xxxx)
      2888, Private, 4th (City of Dublin Militia) Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers Unfortunately I haven’t found out much about him. His service papers didn't survive. Medal roll shows that he was invalided 1900. He was entitled only QSA with the clasps; “Relief of Ladysmith”, “Orange Free State”, “Tugela Heights” and “Cape Colony”.
      Based on the clasps, it is possible to say that he was in South Africa at least December 1899 – February 1900 (Relief of Ladysmith and Tugela Heights). Because he was invalided, he was most likely evacuated before he became entitled KSA.  Thomas Baker (1865 - 10 April 1941)
      3907, Private, 4th (City of Dublin Militia) Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers Thomas was born circa 1865 in the Chapelizod parish in Dublin and also lived there. He was married and lived with his wife and children there. His wife’s name was Anne Traynor. In 1896, at the age of 31, Thomas Baker enlisted in the 4th. Battalion, the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. This was the old Dublin City Militia Battalion. However, this was not the first time that Baker served with the army. As younger man he previously served as a full time soldier with the 18th. Royal Irish Regiment. At the time of his joining the Dublin City miliita his papers show that he was 5ft.6 inches high, brown hair and blue eyes. Baker was a fine soldier, gaining good conduct pay and described as being a man of “good” character. At the outbreak of the Boer War in 1899, Private Thomas Baker was called up for full time service with the regular military forces and was posted to the 2nd. Battalion the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
      In his papers an interesting letter written on his behalf by his commanding officer, gives some insight into Bakers previous service with the 18th. Royal Irish Regiment in which he earned two good conduct badges and was a man of very good character on his discharge from the Royal Irish. After his return from the Boer War in 1901, he continued to serve with the 4th. Bn. R.D.F. His day job was a farm labourer. He stayed with the 4th. Bn of the Dubs right up to 1912. By this time his family had grown, his wife is listed as living at the Bridge Inn Chapelizod and his children are named Anne, Ellen, Thomas, Joseph and John. It is likely that his wife may have worked in the bar at the Bridge Inn, though further research needs to be done here. His attestation papers showing that for the Royal Irish Regiment he joined at Clonmel in 1884. His death certificate as an army pensioner was located in this record. It shows that he died on 10th. April 1941 at St. Kevin’s Hospital Dublin. His weekly pension at that time was 10 shillings. Baker was not satisfied to remain on retired pay and he enlisted again in 1917 serving in the Great War for 2 years. (France) For his Great War service (Labour Corps) he received the War & Victory Medals.
      His service records with the Royal Irish paint an interesting picture adding detail to this soldiers life. In the 1880’s he was admitted to hospital on a few occasions. Interestingly, on one such occasion he had been “accidentally stabbed by a comrade” He earned the 1854 India Medal with Hazara 1888 clasp while serving with the Royal Irish. Thomas Delaney (1896 – xxxx)
      5614, Private, 3rd (Kildare Militia) Extra Reserve Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers Thomas was born around 1896 as a son of Francis and Hannah Delaney’s from 29 Chapel Street, Leighlinbridge, Co. Carlow. It is a small town on the River Barrow in County Carlow. His father was Malthouse Labourer and mother was looking after the kids. 1901 Census shows that they had all together 5 girls and 5 son’s in the family. Thomas was second youngest by age.
      But Thomas’ mother passed away around 1907-1911. On the 1911 Census, his father lives only with Thomas, one of the older sister and new sister Catherine, who must be born around 1907. Sadly father had been marked his marital status widower.   Three years later when Thomas enlisted, his service papers are showing his Next-In-Kin address given still father Francis, Chapel Street, Leighlinbridge, County Carlow. He describes himself as 18 years old farm labourer from Carlow when he enlisted on the 16th May 1914 into Royal Dublin Fusiliers 3rd Battalion Extra Reserve. Already on the 8th August 1914 he was mobilised and attached to the 2nd Battalion. He was sent to 2nd battalion on the 1st April 1915. At that time his new unit was in France.  Based on his service papers, Private Delaney received gunshot wound to the head on the 26 May 1915. At that period Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2nd Battalion just experienced horrific gas attack to their position on the “Mouse Trap Farm” area. This farm was located half a mile north of Wieltje. It was first given the name 'Shell Trap Farm' by the British. On the 24 May 1915 morning at 02:45 German launched heavy bombardment, involved the greatest use of chlorine gas to date, this time delivered with shells. The German gas came "drifting down wind in a solid bank some three miles in length and forty feet in depth, bleaching the grass, blighting the trees and leaving a broad scar of destruction behind it." Being a mere 30 yards from the enemy trenches the rapid occupation of the farm by the quick-moving German infantry was little short of inevitable. By 9:30 p.m., out of battalion strength of 666 men, all that remained when the battalion "retired" was one officer and twenty other ranks.  The Royal Dublin Fusiliers had suffered a loss of 645 men who were blown to bits, gassed, or driven insane by the effects of poisonous gas. The 2nd Battalion commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Loveband, C.M.G, died the following day. The battalion did not take part in any more major battles for the rest of the year. Engraved on the Menin Gate Memorial there are 143 names from Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2nd Battalion who died on the 24th of May 1915. Mouse Trap Farm, 1915 Private Delaney, after initial recovery, was sent back home on the 18th July 1915 where he was discharged on the 18 November 1915. 24th October 1915 Irish Times published a list of wounded soldiers and Private Delaney’s name appears in the section named “wounded and suffering gas poisoning”. Thomas received King’s Certificate number 102/1519 for his service on the 16 June 1918. At that time he lived in Poe’s Hill road, Leighlinbridge. Unfortunately Thomas health was seriously damaged. He passed away on the 16th November 1925. His name appears on the Leighlinbridge/Old Leighlin Great War memorial. When he died he was only 27 (29) years of age. Carlow Great War Memorial Denis Fitzpatrick (1882 – XXXX)
      4619, Private, 5th Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers Denis was born at St.Pauls parish in Dublin around 1882. His father was James Fitzpatrick, who lived at 1900 on 16 Bloom Street, Manchester.
      When he enlisted for militia service Denis lived in 117 Francis Street, Dublin. His trade is recorded as cattleman. He enlisted into 5th Battalion (County of Dublin Militia) on the 3rd January 1900. Already on the 14th February he was embarked to South Africa. During his time in SA his unit had only minor engagements against the Boers but still they took some losses. Also diseases took its toll and as an extra, 5th Battalion had pretty bad luck with the summer thunderstorms when once a severe storm suddenly hit them when they were in the camp near Mafeking. One of the tent’s was hit by lightning, sheets of corrugated iron flew around and Colonel Gernon and Captain Baker together with many others, sustained very serious injuries. Before end of their time in SA, battalion stationed in Warrenton area, Northern Cape province. Denis was shipped back with the battalion to home on the25th February 1902 where the parade took place and the Duke of Connaught presented officers and men their medals.  The 5th Battalion lost in total two officers and ten men killed, and eight wounded. Denis became entitled set of two medals: Queen South Africa Medal with the clasps “Transvaal”, “Orange Free State”, “Cape Colony” King’s South Africa medal with the clasp “South Africa 1901”, “South Africa 1902” Your collection is a class its own. I started collecting again from NIL medals this summer and I think can be proud what I have found so far. George Thompson
      11544, Private, 2nd Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers George was most likely born in County Wicklow. ICRC papers are referring his next-of-kin address Mrs.Thompson, Rathnew, Co.Wicklow.
      Based on his service number, George enlisted to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2nd Battalion (nicknamed 'The Old Toughs') around summer 1913.
      When the Great War started, he was one of the main patches, who were sent to France in the end of August, 1914. Private George Thompson landed in Boulogne at 23rd August 1914. His unit saw action almost immediately in Belgium and lost large amount of officers and men killed wounded or more “lucky ones” found themselves as Prisoners of War (POW). This all happened due to the hectic retreat from Mons and Le Cateau area in Belgium where Dublin Fusiliers objective was to provide a rear guard force that would cover the retreating British Expeditionary Forces.
      George’s name appears on the 18th February 1915 Irish Times wounded list. He is mentioned again in the summer which indicates that his wounds weren’t too serious and he was back in his unit shortly afterwards. Most likely he was with his battalion when they experienced one of the most horrific events in the Great War – 24th May 1915 first poison gas attach at Ypres. At this time 2nd Battalion was in the area called “Shell Trap Farm” or like they start calling it later on “Mouse Trap Farm”. 24th May 1915 645 men were lost out of 666. This place was located half-a-mile North of Wieltje, originally a moated farm with outbuildings. It was first given the name 'Shell Trap Farm' by the British. The unhappy associations of this designation were held to be detrimental to the garrison's morale and the position was subsequently re-named by the Staff as 'Mouse Trap Farm'. On the morning of the attack on 24th May 1915 what was left of the farm after the bombardment ('a mere heap of mud and rubbish') was defended by two platoons of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers; being a mere 30 yards from the enemy trenches the rapid occupation of the farm by the quick-moving German infantry was little short of inevitable.
      At 2:45 am on the 24th of May, the Germans launched a gas attack on the Allied lines which was the first time that the Germans had used poison gas on a large scale on the Western Front. The German poison gas came ‘drifting down wind in a solid bank some three miles in length and forty feet in depth, bleaching the grass, blighting the trees and leaving a broad scar of destruction behind it.’ By 9:30 pm, out of battalion strength of 666 men, all that remained when the battalion ‘retired’ was one officer and twenty other ranks. For the record, in just eighteen and three quarter hours, the Dublin Fusiliers had suffered a loss of 645 men who were blown to bits, gassed, or driven insane by the effects of poisonous gas. The British at that time had no defences against gas attack; indeed the large-scale use of gas by the Germans on the Western Front had begun at Second Ypres. The Battalion did not take part in any more major battles for the rest of the year.
      Wounded private George Thompson was captured by Germans. He is first listed on the International Committee of Red Cross documents when his soldier’s pay book has been sent to the German records office as he is dead. This list has a stamp from 29th May 1915. Next record shows him as actually being at the field hospital Cologne (Feld Lazarett Köln) on 6th June 1915 and then being held at Siegburg prisoner’s camp, wounded left arm and thigh. In home, Irish Times recorded him as a “Missing” on the 23rd June 1915.
      There was a period when wounded prisoners were exchanged using a “parole system”, whereby the British authorities undertake not to return the man to the field against Germans.  In those circumstances men were sent to garrison battalions that had no likelihood of facing German troops.
      When George arrived back to Ireland, he was transferred to the Royal Irish Fusiliers Garrison Battalion on the 1st January 1917. His new service number was given G/19555.
      After his full recovery, he was sent on to the Royal Field Artillery. New service number 268071.
      His move to the Royal Field Artillery might reflect him becoming medically fit again and perhaps able to be sent to another theatre of war, such as Salonika, or Mesopotamia where again he would not be breaching the terms of his parole.
      Charles Toomey (1872 – XXXX)
      5698, Private, 2nd Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers Charles was born at Clonmurry, Kildare around 1872. He had two sisters Mary and Ester. Based on his medical examination description, he was 5 feet and 8 ¾ inches tall, 161 lbs. His eyes were grey and hair light brown. 
      First served with the 3rd Battalion (Special Reserve) Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He enlisted at Naas 15th February 1896 for regular service. After initial training in the Naas depot, Private Toomey was posted to West Indies on the 5th October 1896. He was attached first to the 1st Battalion but soon after, on the 6th October he was transferred into 2nd Battalion. After a year service in India, he and his battalion left for Maritzburg, Natal, in 1897. During his service in South Africa, he was granted a good conduct pay on the 15th February 1898. The political situation had become so threatening by July, 1899, that the military authorities began to take precautionary measures, and the battalion was ordered to effect a partial mobilisation and to collect its transport. On September 20th it moved by train to Ladysmith and four days later proceeded to Glencoe. The 2nd battalion stationed at Dundee, along with the 1st Leicestershire Regiment, 1st King's Royal Rifle Corps, 18th Hussars, and the 13th, 67th, and 69th Batteries RFA, under Major-General Sir William Penn Symons.  The country was still nominally at peace, but the Dundee force held itself ready for emergencies, and sent out mounted patrols by day and infantry piquets by night, while the important railway junction at Glencoe was held by a company.  
      First battle where Private Toomey found himself was  the Battle of Talana Hill, also known as the Battle of Glencoe. This was the first major clash of the Second Boer War. A frontal attack by British infantry supported by artillery drove Boers from a hilltop position, but the British suffered heavy casualties in the process, including their commanding general Sir William Penn Symons was mortally wounded. Soon after, with the rest of the troops, the 2nd Battalion retreated to Ladysmith.  They were present in the action of Lombard's Kop on 30th October 1899 but were much split up, three companies acting as escort to artillery, one on outpost, etc.  They did not suffer many casualties.  On the same evening the battalion was "hurriedly entrained" and sent down the line to occupy Fort Wylie and protect the great bridge over the Tugela, but the advancing tide of Boer invasion soon lapped round them and they had to move still farther south.  Three sections were in the unfortunate armoured train which was derailed on 15th November 1899.
      At Venter's Spruit on 20th January the 2nd Battalion and the three companies of the 1st Battalion were given under command of General Hart's force.
      In the fourteen days' fighting between 13th and 27th February General Hart's men were at first near the rail-head, and were brought down to Colenso village on the 20th.  On the 23rd February order was received to attack the main Boer position.  A short account of this action is given under the Inniskilling Fusiliers, who led in the assault, but the Connaught Rangers and 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers also pushed in close and lost most severely.  During that attack a Colonel Sitwell was among the killed. The regiment was still to take part in another memorable assault before the close of the relief operations, being transferred to the command of General Barton for the last great effort on the 27th February, when Barton attacked and carried the eastern portion of Pieter's Hill.  In addition to the Dublins his troops that day were the Royal Scots Fusiliers and the Royal Irish Fusiliers.  The assault reflected credit on every one taking part in it, and gained the praise of General Buller.  In the fourteen days' fighting the Royal Dublin Fusiliers losses were approximately 1 officer and 20 men killed, and 6 officers and over 100 men wounded.  Eight officers and 7 non-commissioned officers and men of the 2nd Battalion were mentioned in General Buller's despatch of 30th March 1900, 5 of the latter being recommended for the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Among of the wounded was as well Private Charles Toomey, who received a gunshot wound to his chest on the 27th February 1900 at Pieter’s Hill. After initial recovery in South Africa, Charles was sent back in home on the 18th April 1900. 2nd Bn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers storming Talana Hill Due to his wounds, Private Charles Toomey was discharged from regular service at the 5th July 1901. Papers are showing that he experienced “Intercostal neuralgia” is caused by nerve compression in the abdominal area, which is the area by the ribcage.
      For his service in South Africa, Charles Toomey received Queen South Africa medal with following clasps: Talana - All troops under Lieut. General Sir.W.Penn Symon’s command on 20th Octber 1899 who were north of an east and west line drawn though Waschbank Station. Relief of Ladysmith - All troops in Natal north of and including Estcourt between 15th December 1899 and 28th February 1900 both dates inclusive Tugela Heights - All troops of the Natal Field Force exclusive of the Ladysmith garrison, employed in the operations north of an east and west line through Chieveley Station between the 14th and 27th February 1900 both dates inclusive and disk previously Patrick Moore (1875 - xxxx)
      4855, Sergeant, 2nd Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers Patrick was born in Wicklow circa 1875. He enlisted 1893 age 18 and after initial training in depot, served in East Indies and South Africa. Promoted Corporal 1898 and Sergeant December 1899. He served whole Boer war and was present in Talana. For his war service, he received Queens South Africa medal with 6 clasps and King's South Africa medal with two clasps. Much more research must be done about this pair but I wanted to post it up first - nice Christmas present to myself;). Thomas Glynn (1882 – xxxx)
      7169, Private, 1st Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers Thomas was born 1882 in Rathwire, Mullingar, Westmeath. 
      Attested for service with the Dublin Fusiliers on 12 June 1900 when he was 18 years old from Athlone. His trade was marked on his service papers as a labourer.
      Based on the medical examination sheet, he was 5 feet and 7 5/8 inches tall. He weighd 120 lbs and he had grey eyes and brown hair.  He was posted first into the Royal Dublin Fusiliers Depot on the 24th June. After initial training he was transferred into the 1st Battalion on the 14th April 1901. At that time his new unit was in war at South Africa. The 1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers long continued to operate on the Natal-Transvaal border and on the lines of communication.  One hundred and fifty men of the battalion were in the column of Colonel E C Knox in the first quarter of 1901—one of those columns which swept through the Eastern Tran The Mounted Infantry of the Dublin Fusiliers was represented in the little garrison of Fort Itala, which made such a splendid defence when the place was attacked by Botha with an overwhelming force on 26th September 1901.  Major Chapman of the 1st Dublins, who commanded the garrison, received promotion.  Lieutenant Lefroy and several non-commissioned officers and men were also mentioned in despatches by Lord Kitchener at the time for great gallantry.
      In the beginning of 1902 the 1st Battalion was moved west to Krugersdorp to relieve the 2nd Battalion. After the war in South Africa was over, 1st Battalion was moved to Malta on the end of 1902. One of them was as well Thomas, who left from there on the 2nd November 1902 and staid in Malta until 26th February 1903. Four companies were moved to Crete, including the one where Private Glynn served. He staid in Crete until 3rd March 1904 when companies were joined once again in Malta. The whole battalion occupied St George's Barracks Pembroke at that time but moved to Floriana Barracks in September 1905. The Royal Dublin Fusiliers developed an association with the Floriana Football Club which adopted the Irish green and white checkered shirt as their club colours.
      Thomas staid in there until Battalion was moved to Egypt. His service papers are showing that he was shipped to Egypt on the 6th November 1905 but most likely it took place on the 16th November instead on board the Assaye. This was routine for peace soldiering in Alexandria. On the 5th April 1907, Field-Marshall H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught visited Alexandria andpresented new Colours to the 1st Battalion.
      On the 17th June 1907 Private Glynn’s active service was almost in the end and he was sent back home to Army Reserve on the 18th June 1907.
      Towards the end of September 1907 orders were received for Headquarters and “A”, “C”, “F” and “H” companies were sent to Khartoum, the Sudan. In the meantime Thomas staid in the reserve until 11 June 1912 when he was discharged from service. For his service, Private Thomas Glynn was awarded Queen’s South Africa medal with three bars: Transvaal, SA 1901, SA 1902 Medal has interesting whole ribbon long metal plate with two loops for wear. So, obviously Private Glynn wore his medal with bride. Daniel Maher
      15109, Private, 2nd Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers It is impossible to find out where Daniel was from because his name was too common at this period of time (and still is). There were records of 86 Daniel Maher’s in the 1911 Irish Census. When we are looking their age then around 28 of them were in the age to serve during the Great War.
      Daniel enlisted end of September 1914 into the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. After initial training with one of the Reserve Battalion he was sent on the 3rd May 1915 as reinforcement into 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
      At this time his unit was holding a line in very dangerous place. Just 21 days after his arrival most likely Private Daniel Maher was involved one of the most horrific events in the Great War – 24th May 1915 first poison gas attach at Ypres. At this time 2nd Battalion was in the area called “Shell Trap Farm” or like they start calling it later on “Mouse Trap Farm”.
       At 2:45 am on the 24th of May, the Germans launched a gas attack on the Allied lines which was the first time that the Germans had used poison gas on a large scale on the Western Front. The German poison gas came ‘drifting down wind in a solid bank some three miles in length and forty feet in depth, bleaching the grass, blighting the trees and leaving a broad scar of destruction behind it.’ By 9:30 pm, out of battalion strength of 666 men, all that remained when the battalion ‘retired’ was one officer and twenty other ranks. For the record, in just eighteen and three quarter hours, the Dublin Fusiliers had suffered a loss of 645 men who were blown to bits, gassed, or driven insane by the effects of poisonous gas. The British at that time had no defences against gas attack.
      On the 24th October 1915 Irish Times his name appears on the list of soldiers who suffered gas poisoning. Most likely due to that he was discharged already same year on the 21st December 1915.
      Daniel Maher was entitled:
      -    1914/15 Star
      -    British War Medal -    Victory Medal Arthur Wilkins (20 December 1895 – Spring 1971)
      14091, Private, 7th and 6th Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers Arthur Wilkins was born at the 20 December 1895 in Marylebone, London.
      When the Great War started, he enlisted on the 4th September 1914 into Royal Dublin Fusiliers. On his service papers his trade is marked as a “metal worker mate”. Medical sheet describes him as a 5 feet and 5 inches tall, weight 126 lbs and eyes blue and brown hair.
      Private Wilkins was attached to the unit depot straightway. On the 18th September, he was transferred into 7th Battalion. 
      Private Wilkins landed in Gallipoli on the 9 August 1915.
      Private Wilkins received gunshot wound to the right thigh and wrist on the 17 August 1915. Arthur was first evacuated to Alexandria and then on board H/S “Asturias” to UK. 
      He arrived back home at 26 September 1915
      25 September 1915 posted to regimental depot. 
      27 October 1915 posted to 3rd reserve battalion.
      15 March 1916 attached to the 6th battalion that stationed in Balkans at this time.  He joined battalion on the 6 April 1916 in Azrameri. 
      On September 1917 6th Battalion was moved to Egypt for service in Palestine.
      On the 27 April 1918 they left the Division. On 3 July unit sailed from Alexandria, arriving Taranto five days later and then moving by train to France.
      Following 21 July 1918 they were transferred to 197th Brigade in 66th (2nd East Lancashire) Division.
      On the 29 February 1919 Arthur military service start became to the end and he was sent back to regimental depot. Following month, on the 28 March 1919 Private Wilkins was sent to Army Reserve Class B.
      He was Mentioned in Despatches (MID) on London gazette at the 9 July 1919 for his service in France.
      1921 Arthur married with Eva B Keech.
      Medal entitlement:
      -    1914-15 Star
      -    British War Medal
      -    Victory Medal with Mentioned in Despatches (MID) oak leaf device Edward Walter Ekins
      28873, Private, 7th Battalion
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers Because Edward had almost unique name, then it was possible to narrow him down on the GB Census, calculating age +/- 20 in 1880 (service age during the Great War). There were two Edward W Ekins; one of them had middle name Ward and another middle name was Walter. Edward Ward from Surrey served with the Royal Artillery and was killed in action 1917. Therefore I can be sure that the owner of the medals was Edward Walter Ekins.
      Edward was born 1881 as a son of Walter Edward and Sarah Ekins in Blunham, Hertfordshire. 1911 Census shows that he was Servant Groom. He lived with his parents, 3 brothers and 2 sisters. His brother Jack was KIA in 1918 while serving with the Army Service Corps.
      Ten years later he married with Violet Elizabeth Mayers at age of 30 in 1911. At this time he resided in Welwyn village in Hertfordshire.  
      At some point Edward joined to the Special Constabulary as a part-time volunteer Special Constable. Most likely under the combination of Great War service and regular long service criteria he became entitled a Special Constabulary medal. The medal may be awarded to Special Constables who were recommended by the Chief Officer of Police of the department in which they served for at least nine years and the war period was counted triple. This medal was instituted 30th August 1919 and shows his good conduct and that he returned back to England after the war. 
      After the start of the Great War, Edward enlisted around February 1916. Most likely he was one of the many, who fell under the Military Service Act, which was introduced on 27th January 1916 by government after the Derby scheme was failed. All voluntary enlistment was stopped. All British males were now deemed to have enlisted on 2nd March 1916 and from 25th May onwards, all married men were included as well. Also conscripted men were no longer given a choice of which regiment they joined. That may explain as well how he ended up in the Irish unit, like many English men did after 1916. 
      After initial training he was attached to the 7th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. It is impossible to determinate when this move took place. Similar patch of soldiers, with “close enough” service numbers, were transferred actually from the Royal Fusiliers formation. There is a possibly that as well Private Ekins received his initial training with them before the transfer to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.  
      At this time, 1916-1917 7th Battalion served in Salonika and from September 1917 in Palestine as a part of 10th (Irish) Division.
      They were sent back to France on the 27th April 1918 from Alexandria, arriving Taranto five days later and then moving by train to France. They arrived to Marseilles on the 1st June 1918, where they were reduced to cadre on the 6th June 1918. Troops went to 2nd battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Probably at this time Private Edward W Ekins was transferred over to the 2nd Battalion as well. 
      His new unit were transferred as Army Troops to Lines of Communication on the 16th June. A month later, on the 15th July 1918 they were transferred to 149th Brigade in 50th (Northumbrian) Division.
      Private Ekins wasn’t released to the reserve after the armistice was signed with Germany in a railroad carriage at Compiègne at 11th November 1918. Instead he was mentioned in the commander of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig submission of names at 16th March 1919, whose deserve a special mention (Mentioned in Despatches). His name was published in the London Gazette at 9th July 1919.
      In total, he was awarded:
      -    British War Medal
      -    Victory Medal with Mentioned in Despatches (MID) oak leaf device
      -    Special Constabulary Medal (with the Great War clasp?)
      Edward died in Bedford on the 26th October 1965. He left £1941 to his wife, Violet Elizabeth Ekins. PS: BWM is replacement William Henry Aubin Croker (1852 – 17 June 1935)
      Captain (Honourably Major), 4th Battalion City of Dublin Militia
      Royal Dublin Fusiliers William Henry was born Beaufield, Moyacomb, Co.Wexford 1852. He was the oldest son of Henry Braddell Croker, a Captain of 57th Regiment (West Middlesex). The Croker’s are an Anglo-Irish landed gentry family. The best known branch of them was centred at Ballynagarde in County Limerick. Another branch provided Rt Hon John Wilson Croker sometime MP and secretary to the Admiralty. The name Croker is a variation of Crokker, Crocker or Crock and derives from the old English for potter. There were Crocks and Crockers in Ireland in medieval times.  William was probably sent over to England in early age. Most likely he was educated there in some boarding schools in Worcester area. After his school years he was commissioned as Gentlemen to be Second Lieutenant in the Worcester Militia 3rd and 4th battalion. This was announced on the London Gazette 14th September 1877. Also 1878 Army list records him active in the same area Militia. Following year was important for him because William Henry married at Holy Trinity Church, Paddington on 25th June 1879 with Frances Augustine Pinon du Clos de Valmer. She was eldest daughter of the Viscomte Pinon du Clos de Valmer. His military career went smoothly and already 13th September 1879 he was promoted to the rank Lieutenant. Next promotion followed 27 June 1883, when he received a rank Captain. At this time he served with the 4th Battalion Worcester Militia. Some moment he moved back with his family to Ireland and settled in County Wexford.  His name appears in many Irish Petty Sessions Court Registers over period of 1881 – 1896 and also 1903. Most of these cases were related to the property and usage of the Beaufield land, where Croker’s family resided. As an example, in one instance he sued a man who took four dead rabbits from his land. Also William must be into the horses and horse racing because August 1890 an Irish Times lists his name and his horse “Umrigar” as a participant in the competition.
      When the war in South Africa broke out, William Henry commissioned again. This time he started his service with the 4th battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, to where he was assigned as a Captain, announcement was published in the 22nd May 1900 in London Gazette. During his service in South Africa, he contracted some kind of disease and 5th July 1902 Irish Times shows his name on the dangerously ill officer’s list. 2 weeks later his name appears again but in this time there is a note about his condition and it says “improving”. After his service Captain Croker was entitled a Queen’s South Africa medal with the clasps “South Africa 1901”, “South Africa 1902”, Transvaal , Orange Free State , Cape Colony . Medal roll confirms that during his service in the war, he was attached to the Remount Depot. The Remount Department was set up in order to ensure the uniformity and suitability of the animals purchased for the army, and their training. During the Boer War 326,000 horses and 51,000 mules were lost, mainly through disease, so the animal establishment was increased after that. On the 21 December 1907 Captain William Henry Aubin Croker retired. Therefore he was granted a rank Honorary Major with the permission to wear the prescribed uniform.  In the 1911 Irish census shows him and his wife living in Beaufield, Moyacomb, co.Wexford. They had two domestic servants. No children are showen. On the 8th June 1912 unfortunately William’s wife passed away.
      During the Great War William didn’t serve. In the 1916 an Irish Times has an advertisement with his name and it’s confirmed his address on Beaufield Mansion again.
       
      William Henry Aubin Croker died in his home 17th June 1935. His death was announced in Irish Times 19th June and he was buried on the 20th June next to his wife.
    • What award it is?
      Information from the Burnside family - apparently the photograph is not of Robert Nigel Manners Burnside but of his brother in law William Farmer. The family had the photos mixed up. William Farmer was also English and lived in Stuttgart at the same time as the Robert Burnside family. He eventually married Burnside's sister, which is why the family have both of their pictures and how they got mixed up. Apologies for this.
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