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westernhighlander

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About westernhighlander

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  1. westernhighlander

    Spanish Regulare Tabor helmet plate? Help wanted!

    The arm badge above came with this fez from the war in Ifni in the Western Sahara, 1957-1959. Its a bit dirty and needs a bit of cleaning. Anyway, I'm not sure if they are connected in any way.
  2. westernhighlander

    Katanga badge

    Acquired this with a group of other African items, thought it may be of some interest.
  3. westernhighlander

    EQUATORIAL GUINEA

    Its a little over 5 inches in length ( see attached photo). It is allso curved ( see attached). The curvature would fit a cylindrical form such as the upper arm just below the shoulder or cylindrical headgear such as a fez ( as oppesed to a spherical helmet). If worn on the arm, perhaps some sort of guard or parade unit similar to the metal arm badges worn by Spanish Regulares/Spanish Legion.
  4. westernhighlander

    EQUATORIAL GUINEA

    Might this insignia be from Equatorial Guinea during the reign of Franciscp Nguema 1973-9179 when he used the rooster as the national symbol? Its quite large.absolutel no idea of what it would have been used for, but came with a collection of other African badges.
  5. westernhighlander

    Spanish Regulare Tabor helmet plate? Help wanted!

    Hello, Can anyone ID this insignia. I thought may be a Spanish North African such as the ejercito Regulare Tabor of Tetouan? it has the crescent without a star, the crossed rifles (upside down with shoulder strap), but no crown any help welcome! thanks
  6. Hi,I realize this may be a bit of a stretch, but any help is welcome.I picked up a collection of belgian colonial badges at a recent auction and amongst the lot were three that for the life of me I cant ID. 1st is a crescent witha number 1 mounted over crossed rifles, axes and a spade. No star. I thought it might be a Spanish Moroccan sapper or perhaps a French Algerian Spahi pioneer?,The second badge has a kite shaped enamel shield in front of a rooster with its wings spread. The shield is diveded into red white and green with a blue tip. I thought it may be an Arab or North African unit under French command ( Syrian, Moroccan, Algerian?)The third is an anchor with a grenade over crossed cannon. I thought it may be a French or Belgian colonial marine or infantry artillery badge for either a kepi or pith helmet. judging by the style of the grenade it looks to pre WW1.Thanks in advance for any help. http://www.britishbadgeforum.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=137500&d=1450035240 http://www.britishbadgeforum.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=137497&d=1450034768 http://www.britishbadgeforum.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=137499&d=1450034996
  7. westernhighlander

    Help with French North African Colonial Badge ID

    Hi,I realize this may be a bit of a stretch, but any help is welcome.I picked up a collection of belgian colonial badges at a recent auction and amongst the lot were three that for the life of me I cant ID. 1st is a crescent witha number 1 mounted over crossed rifles, axes and a spade. No star. I thought it might be a Spanish Moroccan sapper or perhaps a French Algerian Spahi pioneer?,The second badge has a kite shaped enamel shield in front of a rooster with its wings spread. The shield is diveded into red white and green with a blue tip. I thought it may be an Arab or North African unit under French command ( Syrian, Moroccan, Algerian?)The third isw an anchor with a grenade over crossed cannon. I thought it may be a French or Belgian colonial marine or infantry artillery badge for either a kepi or pith helmet. judging by the style of the grenade it looks to pree WW1.Thanks in advance for any help. http://www.britishbadgeforum.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=137500&d=1450035240 http://www.britishbadgeforum.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=137497&d=1450034768 http://www.britishbadgeforum.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=137499&d=1450034996
  8. John, Can you provide the reference for the info on the helmet flash of the amphigarious units?
  9. Here are a few pics http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_11_2013/post-13589-0-83630800-1384571811.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_11_2013/post-13589-0-12409900-1384571872.jpg
  10. John, I was ecstatic when I read your post - I simply cant thank you enough - I can't begin to tell you how hard i've been searching for the answer to the identity of the unit this helmet flash represents - some sites suggested it was fabricated whe it clearly isnt. Perhaps its the quality of the lighting in the photo(s) I uploaded, but the lower half of the flash is indeed light blue albeit faded. The underneath side is darker light blue. Additionally if you look at the photo of the helmet with the flash, the diagobnal is indeed the same as on your flash. The photo of close up of the flash appears to have been reversed when the image was uploaded. I will take additional pics in better lighting and upload them again. The flash is on both sides of the helmet. I searched for info on amphigarious units and found the following ( whih I am sure you are already familiar with) http://samilitaryhistory.org/vol056dt.html. Very exciting - Thanks again, Mike Thanks, Mike
  11. Beautiful items, very helpful thanks for posting. The green fabric on my helmet appears to be identical to the ones you,ve posted. I was wondering, if the flash of my helmet doesn't match with known SA units, could it be from rhodesia/Nyasaland?
  12. Hello, saw your post about green veld uniforms and thought I would chime in to see if anyone else can help. I posted is a pic of a green veld helmet with ear flaps . This style helmet was used by RAF and other commonwealth air units prior to ww2. Was known as the type A "East of Malta" flying helmet. It has an SAAF badge as well as an as of yet to be determined helmet flash. The green over grey/light blue indicates atransvaal mounted or air unit of the active citizen force. Why a mounted unit would use an airforce helmet is unclear to me as is the red over black diagonal that is present on the lower grey/blue half of the flash, so I did some additional research - as was stated previously, the helmet flash is divided into an upper and lower halves, suggesting that it is from the Citizen Forces as oppsed to the Permanent Forces. The green upper half indicating Transvaal and the light blue or light grey indicating the branch of service. If the lower half is considered light blue then it would suggest air force, if light grey then ( I assume) Cavalry. The helmet having earflaps is the type issued to airforce units, so this would suggest it would belong to a citizen air force unit from the Transvaal as opposed to mounted or cavalry units. I found the following on the SA airforce website regarding Citizen Air Force in the years immediately preceding WW2, around the date stamped on the interior of the helmet (1928/1929) and during the period the green veld material was used ( 1930's)- see below "Abridged History of the Citizen Aviator in South Africa (A more detailed history is available from Directorate Air Force Reserve 012 312 2295) The first involvement of citizen-aviators in the military environment in South Africa can be traced back to 1912. Cecil Compton-Paterson was appointed as the first instructor at the Military Aviation School established to train aviators for the South African Aviation Corps. A while later the Transvaal Air Training Squadron (TATS) was established to train aviators for the Regular Air Force, this was a slow process and by1923 only 17 officers and 218 other ranks were serving in the fledgling force. To speed up the process a Special Reserve of Flying Officers (SRFO) was established in 1923 to do refresher courses for aviators and in 1926 to do cadet training. (The SRFO existed for several years after World War II.) In 1925 the SAAF began training cadets to supplement the SRFO pilots. Ground subjects were presented at the Military College and flying training at Zwartkop Air Station. Ten student pilots were awarded SAAF Flying Badges (wings) after qualifying in 1927 and were absorbed into the TATS. Two courses followed in 1930 producing a further 38 cadets. At the same time a scheme to train 50 artisans was initiated. In July 1927 a scheme of part-time courses for undergraduate pilots and later for artisans was started at the Transvaal University College (presently University of Pretoria) who formed the TUC Air Squadron as part of the SRFO. In 1928 this squadron was absorbed into the TATS and flying and ground training was done before and after normal working hours. In Europe the rumblings of an impending war were being heard and South Africa, along with other European nations, began to look at military resources. In 1935 the One Thousand Pilots Scheme to train 1000 pilots and 700 aircraft mechanics was launched with a view to training 1000 pilots and 700 mechanics by 1942. To achieve this the TATS was expanded beyond the University of Pretoria to include ab-initio training at civilian flying clubs with advanced training at SAAF Flying Training Schools. In July 1938 the TATS was reorganized into 13 flights located at strategic points in the country and renamed the Union Air Training Group." Given the aforementioned, I wonder if this helmet may be from one of these Transvaal Air Squadrons that preceded or were contemporary to the SAAF.http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_10_2013/post-13589-0-77268600-1383100318.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_10_2013/post-13589-0-98426200-1383101779.jpg
  13. Can anyone recommend how to go about getting something like this professionally restored?
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