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bigjarofwasps

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Everything posted by bigjarofwasps

  1. The intention of this thread, is to be a place to post interesting stories relating to police officer medals you've researched.
  2. Alfred Ernest SCHOLES Born in Derbyshire on the 31st December 1864. Joined Metropolitan Police on the 27th February 1888 - Warrant number 73418 Having completed his training and being posted to D Division, he lodged in a property within Allsopp Mews, in the Marylebone district of London. With two other Constables. At some point possibly as early as the 8th September 1888, following the Anne CHAPMAN murder, SCHOLES was seconded to H Division, to assist in the hunt for Jack the Ripper. He certainly appears to have been on duty in H Division on the night of the 29th/30th September 1888 for the double event murders and states in his memoirs that " he was patroling his beat on Tabbard Street East on the furthest end of his beat on Mile End Road, it was a memorable night there had been a Lord Mayors show, whilst I was on duty Jack the Ripper committed two of his murders in the very street that I was." http://www.gsburroughs.com/ripper-story/ 6th January 1896 PC225D posted to D Division CID. 3rd August 1898 promoted to Sgt 3rd class D Division. 23rd June 1903 promoted to Sgt 2nd class D Division. 21st January 1908 promoted to Sgt 1st class Y Division. 27th June 1910 promoted to Detective Insp Y Division. In 1911 Alfred and his then family of wife and three children were resident at 17, Mark Road, Noel Park, London. Pensioned 14th July 1913 as Detective Inspector Y Division and joins the Port Authority Police at the same rank. Finally retires in 1924 In 1939 he and his wife lived at 55, Whitehall Road, in the Grays area of London. Alfred was then working as a Private Enquiries Agent. It is believed that he died in the Battersea area of London in 1946. Entitled to 1897 Jubilee Medal as PC D Division, 1902 as PS D Division. PC Scholes was just six months into his career with Scotland Yard when he, along with hundreds of other officers, were drafted into the dangerous and dark slums of Whitechapel to hunt for the killer that had been dubbed ‘Jack the Ripper.’ In his memoirs he recalls numerous occasions that he stopped and questioned innocent pedestrians, and led to comparative safety the many ‘fallen’ women who ran into his arms convinced that they had met ‘Jack’ and were next to be slaughtered. It is hard today to imagine the Whitechapel of 1888, with its narrow, unlighted streets, dirty alleys and slum buildings that housed some of London’s most unfortunate and desperate people. It was also a world of multiple races and nationalities all squeezed into a small, heavily populated district. It is also hard to imagine the terror that gripped the people of this poor part of London, and the terror and fear that swept the country as a whole. People genuinely feared for their lives and at the height of the scare, around September and October 1888, the streets of Whitechapel became deserted. Old Bailey cases SCHOLES was involved in............. Housebreaking - 8th February 1897 as a Detective in G Division https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18970208-213&div=t18970208-213&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Robbery - 25th February 1901 as a Sergeant in D Division https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19010225-213&div=t19010225-213&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Robbery - 25th March 1901 as a Sergeant in D Division https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19020310-260&div=t19020310-260&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Libel - 10th March 1902 as a Sergeant in D Divison https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19020310-260&div=t19020310-260&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Forgery 3rd April 1905 as a Sergeant https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19050403-301&div=t19050403-301&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Theft 11th September 1906 as a Sgt in D Division https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19060911-99&div=t19060911-99&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Fraud 21st October 1910 as a Sgt G Division https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19100208-35&div=t19100208-35&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Forgery 31st May 1910 as a Sgt https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19100531-21&div=t19100531-21&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Murder 28th March 1911 as an Insp https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19110328-46&div=t19110328-46&terms=Alfred Sholes#highlight Theft 7th November 1911 as an Insp https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19111107-48&div=t19111107-48&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Theft 30th January 1912 as an Insp Y Division https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19120130-33&div=t19120130-33&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Fraud 4th February 1913 as an Insp https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19130204-32&div=t19130204-32&terms=Albert Scholes#highlight Theft 4th March 1913 as an Insp https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19130304-65&div=t19130304-65&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight http://www.gsburroughs.com/current-book/ SCHOLES was also involved in the famous Edith THOMPSON & Frederick BAYWATER case https://archive.org/details/trialoffrederick015894mbp/page/n1
  3. Joseph DANIELS. Joined 17th May 1886, posted to C Div PC 387 (St James). Warrant No.- 71719 10th August 1888, posted to J Div PC 223/PC 502 (Bethnal Green) and residing at 107 Lefevre Road, Bow (1888-1890). So would have been present during the Whitechapel Murders. 15th August 1890 posted to E Div PC259 (Holborn). He received a pay increase on the 23rd May 1891. Then on the 23rd May 1892, he died on duty, from choking to death on his own false teeth, whilst effecting an arrest. A local paper, The Holborn and Finsbury Guardian ran the following story. The Danger of False Teeth On Wednesday evening at St Clement Danes Vestry-hall, Strand, Mr John Troutbeck, the coroner for Westminster, held an inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of Police Constable Joseph Daniels 259E aged 27 years who was killed early on Sunday morning whilst taking a prisoner to Bow Street Police Station. Superintendent Steggles of the E Division, was present, Joseph Daniels a registration agent of 9 Meeting House Lane, Peckham. Identified the deceased as his son, lately resided at Jubilee Buildings, Waterloo Road. Sometime ago he had erysipelas in the face, and the divisional surgeon ordered him to have some of his teeth extracted and replaced by false ones. These he was wearing at the time of his death, PC 379E Alfred Smith, said that on Sunday morning at about 12:20 he was in Kemble Street, Clare market, taking a prisoner to Bow Street Police Station. A crowd of several hundred persons had assembled and an attempt to rescue the man was made. Witness blew his whistle and in response the deceased came running up. He took hold of the prisoners other arm and they had only proceeded a few yards, when the witness missed the deceased, and on looking round saw him lying on the pavement. Another constable came up and witness went oh his way. PC350E William Stewart said that he was on duty in Newcastle Street when he heard the whistle blow, and on going to Kemble Street saw the two Constables with a man in custody. Witness broke through the crowd, and then he saw the deceased lying on the ground. He immediately undid his collar and sent for an ambulance, on which he conveyed the unfortunate man to the hospital. By the Coroner: the deceased was not knocked down, kicked or otherwise assaulted. Dr Eric Law Pritchard, house physician at Kings College Hospital, said that the deceased was dead when he was admitted. He made the post-mortem examination, which revealed that the deceased, was an exceedingly healthy man. Just about the larynx witness found a set of false teeth impacted, which had produced suffocation, the cause of death. The teeth were of a very inferior make, no doubt they became loosened through the deceased running, and an inspiration drew them down his throat. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and added that they thought the deceased was over anxious to do his duty. Entitled to the 1887 Jubilee Medal. Joseph married Louisa Beatrice Ridley second quarter 1885, at Camberwell. Their first child was a daughter- Florence Ellen Daniels Birth Date: 5 Dec 1886 Birth Place: Saint Peter-great Windmill St , Westminster, London, England Baptism Date: 20 Apr 1887 Baptism Place: St Peter's, Westminster, Middlesex, England Father: Joseph Daniels Mother: Louisa Beatrice FHL Film Number: 1468962 Birth certificate of his first son Albert Henry Joseph Daniels, reveals born December 1888 but registered first quarter 1889, Bethnal Green. Baptism Date:9 Dec 1902 St Paul, Westminster Bridge Road Southwark Lived at 102 or 109 Jubilee Buildings (handwriting to difficult to read). Joseph and Louisa in the 1891 census living in Southwark. Pension to wife and 3 children - "died from the effects of an injury received in the execution of his duty" - 'swallowed false teeth when going to assist in arrest of a prisoner' Death Register ref. - June 1892-St Giles 1b 377 age 27- died 22nd May.
  4. Thought I'd try and get the ball rolling with this one. It relates to an officer from G Division of the Metropolitan Police. During my research into him I discovered that he was first on the scene at a double murder at Clerkenwell in 1896. Back in the day it was big news, but over the last 100 years or so has slipped from the public conscience and is little known now. Perhaps this post will change all that..................? Robert WAGG Born 14th Feb 1873 St Buchanan Near King's Lyn, Norfolk. Joined 23.04.1894 (aged 21) warrant number 79498 posted to G Division Height 5`9" Weight 12 stone 9 Lbs Chest 35.5 inches Complexion Dark Eyes Dark Brown Hair Brown. Occupation porter (Great Eastern Railway - Bishopsgate) Martial status - single. Wednesday 8th July 1896 - Coroner's Court Double Murder of James & Emma Riley by Elijah Galley. Robert Wagg Police Constable 328G On Saturday last July 4th at 10:15 PM, I was in North Street, Caledonian Road, when a man unknown to me came up and said a man and a woman were killed at 40 North Street. I went to the house and passed the little girl, Alice Riley on the stairs as I was going down to the kitchens At the doorway of the front kitchen a man and woman were lying apparently dead. The man was lying on his face in a pool of blood and the woman close to him on her face with blood on her forehead. I got the assistance of another Police Constable 330G and sent for Dr Rains. I saw a poker lying on the womans body and there was blood in different parts of the room - front kitchen. I went to the Police Station and on my return found Dr Rains in the kitchen. Cross examined - I did not search the back room. I saw Mr Galley outside his shop not more than five minutes before I was called to 40 North Street. Also gave evidence at the Old Bailey, for the same case https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse. ... #highlight https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse. ... #highlight 14th Feb 1897 Marries Harriett at St Mark's Church Clerkenwell his address given as 76 King's Cross Road (Police Station). 1901 census couple (and two children Ivy & Robert) living at 10 Brewer Street North Clerkenwell Islington Daily Gazette and North London Tribune Wednesday 28th June 1905 The Pentonville Tragedy Yesterday afternoon Mr Walter Schroder Deputy-Coroner for Central London, held an inquest at the St Pancras Coroner's Court relative to the death of Charles Henry Mesinal aged 70 years, a cabman, lately living at 17, Affleck Street, Pentonville Road, who died from self inflicted wounds. Esther Hammick, living at 17 Affleck Street Pentonville Road a widow who lived with the deceased stated that the deceased a cabman, htree months ago had an accident. He was thrown from his cab and his spine was injured. Dr Macfee attended to him. He improved in health till a fortnight ago, when he took to drinking brandy and became very strange in his mind. On Friday morning she awoke and then found the deceased standing over her with a knife. She found that he had stabbed her arm. She struggled with him and he stabbed her in the breast. She got away from him and called for the police. Both of them were afterwards taken to the Royal Free Hospital. Deceased died on Saturday evening. Six weeks ago he threatened to throw himself out of the window, so she watched him and prevented him from doing so. Dr Arthur Stanley Woodward, resident medical officer of the Royal Free Hospital, Gray's Inn Road stated that on admission he found deceased suffering from a number of stabs over both arms and over the heart and stomach and deceased told him that he had inflicted the injuries himself. The injuries were somewhat serious and caused severe shock. The wound in the stomach was 2 and a half inches long and very serious injuring the liver and bruising the heart. On making a post mortem examination of the body he found that there were 30 stabs on one arm and two stabs on the other arm. There were 23 stabs over the heart and five or six stabs in the abdoment. Death was due to shock and bronchitis combined with the injuries. The deceased told them that the reason that he had inflicted the injuries was that he had no money and that he was going to the infirmary on Friday and sooner than do so he decided to commit suicide. He also stated that he stabbed the woman he lived with simply because he was worried. Thomas Hammick son of the first witness gave evidence confirmatory to that given by the mother. Police Sereant Edwin Matthewson 37G said that at twnety past five on Friday morning he was called to the house and found Mrs Hammick there injured. Deceased had barricaded the door with chains and the table, so he forced the door. On entering he found the deceased seated on the bed holding the knife in his hand. He was bleeding from wounds in the abdomen. He said "I wish I'd killed her. I wish I was dead. The knife was not sharp enough, or I should have been dead before you got into the room. You can take me now". Dr Caunter, the police surgeon was called after which the man and women were tkane to the Royal Free Hospital. The room was in great disorder as if there had been a severe struggle. Police Constable Robert Wagg 328G, gave simialr evidence. The jury returned a veredict of "suicide whilst temporarily insane" and complimented Police Sergeant 37G for rendering first aid to the deceased. Dismissed 17.03.1908 G Division Police orders records the following as the reason for his dismissal ‘Improperly arresting two persons on an unfounded charge and complained of by one of them for assault; further, using abusive language towards witnesses, and considered unfit for the police force.’ Entitled two 1897 Jubilee Medal & 1902 Coronation Medal Islington Daily Gazette and North London Tribune Monday 11th July 1910 A double charge At the Clerkenwell Police Court on Friday before Mr Cluer Alfred Bass 31 a table maker of Britannia Street, Hoxton was charged on a warrant with assaulting Robert Wagg at the Angel public house, High Street, Clerkenwell. Mr W T Ricketts prosecuted. The prosecutor said he was doorman at the "Funland" Upper Street. About a month ago he ejected the prisoner and another man from those premises. Bass then threatened him. On Monday last witness was in the Angle having finished his day's work and the prisoner saw him. "Here is that blank blank" said the prisoner and he took up a glass said Wagg hurled it at him and ran off. Prosecutor was cut on the right eye and went off to the police station and then to the hospital. Bass said he was not at the house at all and knew nothing of the assault. Mr Cluer said there must be some witness. Wagg said they were afraid to come. Mr Cluer said they must. Bass was next charged with unlawful possession of five blank cheques on the National Bank Limited, King's Cross Branch, at King's Cross Road. Police Constable Pickard 381G said he arrested and found the cheques upon him, inside the left leg of his pants concealed in a cigerette case. Prisoner said he found them about eight days ago in King's Cross Road. Mr Cluer said the cheques had been lost and asked for a remand. The case was accordingly remanded, prisoner allowed bail. Islington Daily Gazette and North London Tribune Monday 25th July 1910 A Doorkeeper's Complaint At the Clerkenwell Police Court, Alfred Bass 31 tablemaker was charged with assaulting Robert Wagg doorkepper at Funland Upper Street. This charge was now withdrawn in consequence of the fact that the man's arrest led to graver allegations. He was charged with breaking and entering number 7 Crownsdale Road St Pancras and stealing blank cheques the property of John Howard sub-postmaster. The blank cheques were it was stated by Police Constable Pickard found in a cigerette case concealed inside the left leg of his pants. Further inquiry led to a charge of forging and uttering a cheque for £4 17s. Frederick Westbury of Dover Street, Southwark said the prisoner brought an order for bamboo articles and paid for them by cheque. here was £4 0s 6d change for the prisoner. The cheque was returned by the bank. The doorkeeper Wagg now complained that he has been discharged from his employment because his employees were afraif of the gang of roughs he may have stirred up by having prisoner arrested. Mr Cluer- If that is the reason it seems hardly fair, since you have been largely instrumental in bringing a man to trail on serious charges. The case was sent to the Central Criminal Court. https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse. ... #highlight 1911 Census couple living (with Ivy & Robert) at 12 Cynthia Street (Pentonville Road) - Robert is recorded as being out of work. He died on the 11th August 1947 at the Archway Hospital Highgate, leaving an estate of £423 3s & 3d, aged 72. Constable Robert WAGG 328G Islington Gazette Wednesday 1st December 1897 Assaulting the police Assaulting the Police. Mary Ann Kills, 49. a machinist, of Northampton Road, Clerkenwell, was charged with being drunk and with assaulting Police-constable Wagg. 329 G. Warner-street, Clerkenwell. The officer said that on Saturday evening the prisoner, who was very drunk m refused to move on and struck him in the mouth. Defendant said the assault was accident done in the struggle when the officer twisted her arm. She had only been in the public house to have some rum hot as the day was wet and she bad a cold. Mr. Bros fined her 10s., or seven days’ imprisonment in default. Saturday 4th June 1898 A HARD CASE. Ellen Joslin. aged married, of 1 Attneave Street. Clerkenwell. was charged with stealing from No. 13. Yardley-street, a loaf, value 3 3/4d the property Griffith Evans, dairyman. Prosecutor mid the prisoner entered his shop for half pint of milk and asked the loan of can. While bo was finding a can bo saw her place a loaf under her cape. She paid for the milk and left the shop. went after her, and gave her into custody. Police-constable Wagg, 328 G, said that, acting under the instructions of his inspector, ha bad made inquiries concerning the woman, and it was a very hard case. Her husband was out seeking for work. Mid there was not particle of food in the place for their three young children- The woman bore a good character, and the children wens spotlessly clean. Mr. Horace Smith (to prisoner): Why don’t you come here for assistance, and not steal ? Prisoner, weeping, said she was very sorry that she bad been so tempted. The magistrate directed that the woman should have assistance, and discharged her. Tuesday 3rd July 1900 EX CONSTABLE.[/b] An ex-constable Walter LOCKNEY 27 address and occupation refused, was charged with disorderly conduct and assaulting Police Constable Wagg 328G at Pentonville Road, Islington.On being arrested for disorderly behaviour the prisoner threw the officer to the ground and kicked him on the right knee.Prisoner has been in the force himself and has often been before the court for offences similar to the present one. It took four officers to remove the prisoner from the charge room to the station cell and he assaulted two of them on the way one of them being Constable WAGG, when he again attacked striking him about the head and chest.The alledged disorderly conduct consisyed of pushing people from the pavement by pretended drunkeness.Prisoner on oath denied the allegations against him and said the police made a dead set against him because he had formerly been a constable. His throwing WAGG to the gorund was the result of accident. He had only been fetched out of prison by his wife just before this occurred. Mr Chapman said he could not overlook the conduct of the prisoner who ought to have known so well how to behave himself towards the police. He would go to prison for one month's hard labour. Tuesday 13th May 1902 WINDOW SMASH Charles Bell, 36, a carman, of Benjamin street, Clerkenwell, was charged at Clerkenwell Poiite-court yesterday with breaking a plate glass window at the " Red Lion," Red Lion Street Clerkenwell, value £12, the property of Sidney Smith. Mrs. Smith said on Saturday afternoon she refused to serve the prisoner with liquor. He bent over the bar, seized her by the throat, and said, " If you don't I'll smash your window." He afterwards turned and struck a plate-glass window with his fist. smashing the glass and doing damage to the amount of £12. He ran out of the house, but was followed and arrested by Police-constable Wagg. Mr. D'Eyneourt committed the prisoner for trial. Tuesday 3rd June 1902 Busy on the roof BUSY ON THE ROOF, Thomas Peters, I8, a labourer, of Goswell road, Clerkenwell, and William Hodgson, 18, a cycle cleaner, of Ware-street, Hoxton, were charged at Clerkeuwell Police-court yesterday with attempting to steal a quantity of lead from the roof of unoccupied premises at Jerusalem court, Clerkenwell. Police-constable Wagg, 323 G, said on Saturday evening he saw the two prisoners on the roof of No. 4, Jerusalem-court. Hodgson had an axe and a hammer in his possession, and was busy cutting away lead, while Peters was pulling off the pieces dislodged and packing them up. When the officer appeared on the roof the prisoners in their anxiety to make good their escape trod on a skylight, and both fell through the glass. Peters called out to his companion, "Give in ,we are fairly copped ' this time." Mr. Bros sent Hodgson to prison for three imonths, and Peters for six weeks. Tuesday 22nd July 1902 Islington Daily Gazette A BRUTAL ASSAULT. John May, 30, a carman, of 1, Mary Ann street, St. George's, E, was charged with assaulting James Cross, a tram car Conductor, Clerkenwell Road. The complainant said on Sunday night the prisoner jumped on to his car, seized him by the throat, punched him in the face, and kicked him in the groin. He did not know why the prisoner attacked him, but he had evidently been drinking. A crowd quickly collected, and the complainant and the prisoner fell to the ground together. Police Constable Wagg came up, and May was given into his custody. Mr.'d'Eyncoart--It is a brutal assault without any provocation. Two months' hard labour. Wednesday 6th August 1902 Scene in the Caledonian Road SCENE IN THE CALEDONIAN ROAD. Yesterday, at the Clerkenwell Police - court, James Brady,26, and Edward Brady, 24, bcth warehousemen, of All Saints street, N., were charged with assaulting Police-constable Wag, 328 G. James was further charged with assaulting Police-constable Newcombe, 370 G and Edward with assaulting John Alexander, a compositor, at Caledonian-road. Mr. Weaver Mallard defended. Police-constable Wagg deposed that at 3:15 that morning he saw the two defendants outside a coffee-stall in Caledonian-road. As witness, approached one of them said, "Here comes ***** rozzer." Witness advised them to go away, when James Brady struck him a violent blow in the face felling him to the ground. The other defendant also assaulted him while he was on the ground. He got up and was, again knocked to the ground. Others came up. and the attitude of the crowd was so violent that witness was forced to draw his truncheon, and he struck James with it. Previously someone had snatched his whistle away. After a little time two policemen and a civilian came to his assistance, and they were also badly assaulted by the two prisoner.Cross examined -He was annoyed at bei;s called a "rozzer." He did not offer to fight them, or say they were not going to take a "rise" out of him. Police-constable Newcombe said when he arrived on the scene the last witness was surrounded by several men. He seized James Brady, when the latter kicked him on the knee and threw him violently to the ground. John Alexander, of 51, Offord-road, deposed that he seized Edward Brady, who was stooping over Police-constable WAGG, when the prisoner struck him to the ground and kicked hint violently in the mouth. His lip was cut very badly, and had to be stitched up at the station.. He was also bruised about the head, his hat was smashed, and he had lost his stick. Prisoners elected to give evidence on their own behalf. James Brady said be and his brother had returned from a holiday outing,and were having a cup of coffee at a stall, practically outside their residence. Police-constable Wagg came up and said, "Not so much of the rosser,'" and subsequently remarked, " Push off of this." Witness went on drinking his coffee, when the constable challenged him to fight. He refused, and the constable called witness a coward. After that witness said, "I'll oblige you," and walked towards the constable, when the-latter drew het truncheon and struck him across the jaw With it. He closed with the constable, and' they fell to the ground. The other constable then came up. After being on the ground some time witness was allowed to get up, when Police Constable Wagg struck him twice over the head with his truncheon. Edward Brady corroborated his brother's evidence. With regard to John Alexander be admtlted striking him, but only after Alexander had struck him on the hat with his walking. stick. Mr. Bros sent James Brady to gaol for six weeks; and fined Edward Brady 40s. and 20s costs. Friday 8th August 1902 Saturday FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1902. THE COFFEE STALL DANGER. The circumstances of the manslaughter of Mr Spicer in Eustont Road are so recent that importance is given to a cowardly attack upon two Police Constables at a coffee-stall in Caledonian- road, and for which one man was sent to prison and another was bound over to keep the peace. We hesitate to condemn any good thing because it is misused, and therefore in view of the advantages which the coffee stall offers to the early morning and night workers we are unwilling to condemn it because it. becomes the rendezvous of night prowlers who are professional outlaws or who belong to the rank and file of the homeless Hooligan ready out of pure devilry to engage in any war with peaceful citizens. That it meets a want in the earlier hours of the night is doubtful, for ordinary refreshment houses are open until past midnight, and the majority of early birds in the industrial world do not require breakfast until a much later hour, indeed, until five or six in the morning. It could not be said that a quarter-past three a.m. was a breakfast hour, and it was at that time that Police-constable Wagg approaching a coffee stall in Caledonian-road heard some men say "Here comes a rozzer " (i.e., a policeman). The expression was to say the least aggressive, and the constable had a perfect right to " Move on " men who thus showed their readiness to insult the officer of the peace, more; over they followed up the remark with a cowardly assault upon him, and another constable and a passing citizen who came to their assistance. Both the assailants described themselves as warehousemen who had returned from a holiday outing, and they told a singular story of the constable challenging them in the first instance to fight and one of them " obliging him." Mean- while, as in the Euston-road homicide, there was an absence of testimony from the coffee stall keeper, who ought to have been a good witness. The very fact that these men seldom remember or see anything that passes before their stalls is a presumption in favour of the terrorism that the midnight prowlers exercise over them. The principal assailant in this affray was sent to prison for six months, but his brother, who appeared to be an active partizan, got off with the binding over. Seeing that the licensing law closes even, a harmless fried fish shop at half-past twelve at night, it seems somewhat of an anomally that night birds who are turned out of refreshment houses can go direct to a coffee stall and defeat any intention the Legislature had in making the first restriction. A murder of a policeman in Whitechapel some time ago, the killing of Mr. Spicer since, and innumberable cases of robberies and assaults in the small hours directly arising from coffee stalls ought to raise the question of whether there would be any hardship in restricting the business of the coffee nab—which is a profitable venture that contributes nothing to rates and taxes—to reasonable hours in the early moring when the legitimate workman comes forth to his daily toil? There is no reason why the thief, the prostitute, the roysterers, the hooligan, or even the cabman—who has a regular " shelter" at his command—should be provided with inducements to remain in the streets at unholy hours, and they can make but a poor justification for legitimate refreshment in the first hours of the day. it seems to us that the coffee stall is the remnant of the old days of night houses, and that as the population has become the better for the abolition of those places, so a restriction should be put upon what remains of a bad old custom. Nightly disturbances, and the testimony of the police themselves that most of the people who use coffee stalls in the small hours are the enemies of law and order, should be enough to suggest proper restrictions as to hours sufficient to safeguard the early morning worker who has a right to his humble breakfast and who would in no way be inconvenienced by the prohibition of the sale of refreshments at hours when they can neither be called supper nor breakfast. Monday 15th December 1902 Man & wife Man and wife Thomas Calvert 48 a coal porter of Hermes Hill, Pentonville was charged with assaulting his wife Louise Calevert.The complainant said her husband while they were at home the previous evening threatened to stab her with a knife. When the defendant was given into custody his wife complained that he had bitten her hand. Police Constable Wagg said he saw the defendant rush at his wife with an open knife in his hand. It was a murderous looking weapon that was taken from Calvert. Mr d'Eyncourt sent Calvert to gaol for three months and granted the wife a seperation, Calvery to pay her 6s weekly. Tuesday 4th August 1903 Clerkenwell CLERKENWELL. Charles Parson, 21, labourer, of no fixed abode, was charged with attempting to steal a watch and chain from the person of James George, at Pentonville-road —The Prosecutor, an estate collector, was attacked by the Prisoner and two other men at midnight. They ran off after hustling him, and he then noticed that his watch chain was hanging down. He spoke to Police-constable Wagg G Division, who pursued the lads. After a chase of about 6OO yards the officer succeeded in arresting Parsons, whose progress was arrested by a private individual. The prosecutor's watch was in pocket but the bow was broken off. This was found near the spot where the prosecutor was attacked. —The Prosecutor desired acknowledge the promptitude and energy displayed by Wagg.—Mr Paul Taylor, in committing the Prisoner for trial, asked the Prosecutor to repeat his commendation the officer to the Judge the Sessions. Tuesday 22nd September 1903 Alleged wounding. Yesterday, at the Clerkenwell Police-court, Alfred Crowder, 46, a costermonger, of no fix abode, was charged with maliciously wounding James Sessions, a metal polisher. The complainant was having some refreshment with a friend in the " George the Fourth " public house ' Pintonville-road, on Saturday night, when he received a blow in the back. He turned round and confronted the prisoner, who was flourishing a knife. Crowder, it was alleged, made another blow at the complainant, and Sessions, in warding it off, received the point of the blade in his right hand. Crowder was followed out, of the house and the knife taken from his possession. Police-constable Wagg, 323 G, was called and the prisoner was given into his custody. In reply to the charge, Crowder said, " The reason I did it was because be spit a mouthful of beer in my face." Mr. Bros remanded the prisoner. Tuesday 15th March 1904 Violent Milkman VIOLENT MILKMAN, Robert Jones, 28, a milkman, of no fixed abode, was charged, at the Clerkenwell Policecourt yesterday, with assaulting three police officers. Police-sergeant Hammond said that the prisoner rushed up to him in Clerkenwell-close on Saturday evening, and, flourishing a poker, shouted, "Now look out for yourself." The officer took the poker from the prisoner and arrested hint. Jones then became violent, struck the sergeant in the chest, and threw him heavily , to the ground. Police Constable Waller ran up, whereupon Jones said, "Look out, I'm going to give you trouble." He then kicked out wildly, bruising Police-constable Waller in four places on the legs and kicking his right hand. He also kicked Police-constable Wagg on the left leg and was not overpowered until his boots had been removed. Aprevious conviction was proved against him, and Mr. Bros sent him to gaol for six weeks. Tuesday 29th March 1904 The Booze Thomas Bull (26), Frederick Pierce (26), and Albert Cresswell (19) were charged with assaulting Police Constable Wagg 328G, at Pentonvilleroad. Louis Lewis, 38, a carpenter, of Collier street, Islington, was charged with assaulting the same officer at the same place and John Skaggs, 24, was charged with being drunk. The officer (Wagg) said that on Sunday morning he saw a large crowd in Pentonville Road, round a coffee stall. He proceeded there and saw a man on the ground, bleeding from the mouth. All the prisoners were in the crowd standing round. The man said he did not know who struck him, and the officer requested the crowd to go away. Cresswell abused witness and then struck him in the face. The officer "made a grab " at Cresswell, and Pierce then struck him in the chest and Bull tripped him up. They then ran away, and the officer got up and followed. With assistance be succeeded in arresting Cresswell, when Lewis dealt him a blow. Eventually all the prisoners were arrested. Mr. Ricketts appeared for Pierce, and. in cross - examination, Wagg said he and his brother officers drew their truncheons, but never attempted to use them. Pierce was arrested on entering the police-station with his friend Bull. Skeggs alleged that Police-constable Wagg knocked him to the ground with a blow on the nose. This was denied by Wagg. For the defence, witnesses were called to the effect that the police were violent, and the prisoners had to defend themselves against the police. In the result, Mr. Bros fined Skaggs and Cresswell 40s and discharged Lewis, Pierce, and Bull. Tuesday 26th July 1904 Clerkenwell Hooliganism CLERKENWELL HOOLIGANISM. John Kibble, 22, and William Thompson, M, described as carmen, were charged at the Clerkenwell Police-court yesterday with assaulting the police. Both prisoners, who reside in Clerkenwell, were seen in Garnault-place at two o'clock on Sunday morning kicking a can about the roadway. Police-constable Wollard, 274 G, spoke to them, whereupon Kibble used a filthy expression. The officer seized him. Kibble became violent and threw the constable heavily to the ground. Thompson then ran up and dealt the officer three swinging blows on the head with his clenched flat. The constable drew his truncheon, but it was wrenched from his grasp by Kibble. Police-constable Wagg ran up just as Kibble was about to belabour Police-constable Wollard, and snatched away the truncheon. Kibble immediately kicked Wagg about the legs. Both prisoners were then conveyed to the station. Previous convictions were proved against the prisoners: and Mr. d'Eyncourt sent Kibble to gaol for tiwo months, and Thompson for six weeks. Thursday 6th October 1904 A rough neighbourhood ASSAULTING THE POLICE. Ellen Parsons, 37, Married, of Aylesbury Place Clerkenwell, was charged with assaulting Police Constable Wagg 328 G. The prisoner was taken into custody for behaving in a disorderly mariner and using bad language. Immediately on her arrest she spat in the officer's face. Mr. Bros ordered her to pay a fine of 40s in default, one month's imprisonment. 20th March 1906 Troubles of the publician John Murray 21 seaman of Caledonian Road, was charged with assaulting Henry Green inside the Duke of York public house, York Road by kicking him in the back. Mr Ford stated that prisoner went to the public house. He was very drunk and prosecutor a barman refused to serve him. He was requested to leave, the barman holding the door open for him. Instead of doing so, he turned savagely upon the prosecutor, stuck him, knocked him down, and kicked him about the body in the ribs and on the back. Police Constable Wagg said that he came up and stopped the prisoner from further kicking the barman. He know the prisoner as a man who had been discharged from the navy. Mr Bors fined him 40s or a month.
  5. Ok the new thread has been started, I've called it Tales from the station cat. I assume that meets with everyone's approval? I've been unable to work out how to transfer posts to different threads, so Alan it's not to much trouble could you repost your none Watkins related threads onto it? I'd do it for you, but then it would look like I'd done the research. Then what I'll do I'll delete them from this thread so as to keep this one purely for Watkins.
  6. Look forward to reading that Alan, I’ll set up the thread over the weekend. I’ll see if I can work out how to separate your other posts from Watkin’s.
  7. So as not to detract from PC Watkins on this thread. How would forum users feel about making a new thread incorporating police medals with an interesting stories? I thought perhaps calling it Peeler's Ripping Yarns or something like that?
  8. Splendid stuff Alan!!! Could sit and read this stuff all day. Keep it coming!!!!
  9. bigjarofwasps

    LAPD medals & ribbons........................

    This is a nice looking medal. Based on the military silver star I suspect?
  10. Ladies/Gents, Would be grateful if anyone could help me identity the ribbons that this officer is wearing. I'm no expert but it appears he's been a cop since at least 1992 and has some military service in there to, am curious to know why he doesn't have the police service ribbon or detective service ribbon despite this? Any suggestions? 1. Navy Achievement Medal 2. Combat Action Ribbon 3. Presidential Unit Citation 4. 5. 6. Long Service Ribbon? 7. 8. National Defense Ribbon 9. Iraq Campaign Medal 10. War on Terror Medal 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Police Star 16. Police Commission Unit Citation 17. Police Meritorious Unit Citation 18. Civil Disturbance 1992 19. Earthquake 1994 20. Democratic National Convention
  11. bigjarofwasps

    Florida Police Ribbons?

    Couple of questions here, if anyone can answer them? Why is this officer wearing her ribbons on the wrong side? Have a read of this........... http://battlerattle.marinecorpstimes.com/2013/07/03/police-department-cancels-use-of-dod-ribbons-following-navy-cross-recipients-call/ What are the ribbons she's wearing and what should they in fact be? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Army Long Service Medal 6. World War II Army of Occupational Medal
  12. bigjarofwasps

    Iraq Commitment Medal

    Did anything ever become of this medal?
  13. Hi Gents, Just stumbled across this...... has anyone got any opinions on why it`s only appears to be for US personal? The full criteria is on wiki, but for some reason this site won`t allow me to add a link? Check it out and let me know what you think. Gordon.
  14. bigjarofwasps

    Florida Police Ribbons?

    Thanks for your replies to this thread guys. I can't understand why there isn't a set system for police medals & ribbons country wide. That would certainly make life easier? Also has the SPD situation only just come to light? What were they using as medal ribbons before someone drempt up this crazy idea?
  15. bigjarofwasps

    LAPD medals & ribbons........................

    Irish, based it purely on this source.................... Irish, based it purely on this source.................... http://www.frontiernet.net/~ericbush/US/civilian/LAPD/LAPD.html
  16. bigjarofwasps

    LAPD medals & ribbons........................

    Thanks Irish, interesting stuff. These are the ribbons I was referring to. would be interesting to know as you say if he can wear his police ribbons on his marine uniform.
  17. There's an 1897 example up for auction currently on Ebay - 352361778573
  18. Anyone an authority on the Commissioners Office? Am curious to know why 75 medals where awarded to PC's in the CO and 50 to CID. I assume the CID ones would be all detectives, but what would a PC be doing within the CO. Would they have been in uniform or plain clothes. Does the Special Branch come under either of these numbers?
  19. Other than the obvious GV1R & E11R effigy versions, how many different types of Police LSGC are there or is that it? Is there different Latin wording or anything like that?
  20. Stamped in crude lettering across the head of the king is the phrase ‘VOTES FOR WOMEN’, the slogan of the suffragette movement. The deliberate targeting of the king, as the constitutional monarch and head of the Church of England, could be likened to iconoclasm, a direct assault on the male authority figures that were perceived to be upholding the laws of the country. As Neil MacGregor wrote in A History of the World in 100 Objects, ‘this coin stands for all those who fought for the right to vote’. The British Museum’s example was minted in 1903 but most likely circulated unaltered for ten years before it was defaced, shortly before the outbreak of the First World War in around 1913–1914. We know this from the date of other coins bearing the same slogan in identical lettering. It was said at the time, that the suffragettes had copied the practice from anarchists, who were defacing similar coins with the phrase ‘Vive l’Anarchie’. Precisely just how many coins were defaced is unknown: several other examples are known to exist besides the Museum’s ‘Votes for Women’ coin, but the effort required to deface a single coin means it is unlikely that many were made. It was probably carried out by a single person using just one set of individual alphabet stamps, a process that would have been repetitive and time-consuming. The perpetrator has never been traced, and no direct connection has ever been established between the coins and the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) or other suffragette organisations. The First World War is commonly perceived as a watershed moment, when the sun finally set on the Victorian golden age: ‘never such innocence, never before or since’, to use the oft-quoted words of Larkin. Yet this is a romanticised and superficial view of pre-war Britain that conceals a more disturbing image, of a country beset by domestic crises and civil disorder. These included anarchist violence and the beginnings of the Troubles in Ireland, and chief among them was the campaign for women’s suffrage. Suffragette militarism, or ‘direct action’, as it was also known, was characterised by bombings, arson, window smashing and the destruction of cultural property. It reached a tragic climax when Emily Wilding Davison ran out in front of the king’s horse at the Epsom Derby, in June 1914. The simple act of defacing a coin can appear trivial in comparison with these more serious acts of sedition, but it nevertheless conveyed the same symbolic message of protest against a government that refused to extend women the vote.
  21. Arthur Charles Frost Arthur Charles Frost born 17th February 1867 in the parish of Brooke Norwich Norfolk. 1888 Marries his wife Ellen in Reigate. 1890 joins Metropolitan Police (06.01.1890) warrant number 75058 posted to J Division. Living at Moyna Road Upper Tooting. Trade gardener for a Capt Parr The Cedars Upper Tooting. 1891 Living in Bonner Street Bethnal Green. 1897 awarded Diamond Jubilee Medal J Division. 1898 Gives evidence at the Old Bailey (12th December), for a coining offence that occurred on the 17th November on Hackney Road, as Constable 252J. https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp… 1899 Gives evidence at the Old Bailey 24th July, for a wounding offence that occurred on the 26th June on Whitechapel Road concerning the use of a revolver as Constable 252J. https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp… 1901 Living 53 Russia Lane Bethnal Green. 1902 award Coronation Medal J Division. 1902 Gives evidence at the Old Bailey 5th May, for a wounding offence that occurred on the 24th March on Paradise Street, Bethnal Green as Constable 24JR. https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp… 1911 award Coronation Medal J Division? 1911 Living 29 Bandon Lane Bethnal Green. 1913 Gives evidence at the Old Bailey on the 4th March, for a theft offence that occurred on the 28th January Marylebone as a Detective in D Division. https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp… 1918 retires from police D Division as a Detective 18.03.1918. 1918 dies Paddington.
  22. Alfred Ernest SCHOLES Born in Derbyshire on the 31st December 1864. Joined Metropolitan Police on the 27th February 1888 - Warrant number 73418 Having completed his training and being posted to D Division, he lodged in a property within Allsopp Mews, in the Marylebone district of London. With two other Constables. At some point possibly as early as the 8th September 1888, following the Anne CHAPMAN murder, SCHOLES was seconded to H Division, to assist in the hunt for Jack the Ripper. He certainly appears to have been on duty in H Division on the night of the 29th/30th September 1888 for the double event murders and states in his memoirs that " he was patroling his beat on Tabbard Street East on the furthest end of his beat on Mile End Road, it was a memorable night there had been a Lord Mayors show, whilst I was on duty Jack the Ripper committed two of his murders in the very street that I was." http://www.gsburroughs.com/ripper-story/ 6th January 1896 PC225D posted to D Division CID. 3rd August 1898 promoted to Sgt 3rd class D Division. 23rd June 1903 promoted to Sgt 2nd class D Division. 21st January 1908 promoted to Sgt 1st class Y Division. 27th June 1910 promoted to Detective Insp Y Division. In 1911 Alfred and his then family of wife and three children were resident at 17, Mark Road, Noel Park, London. Pensioned 14th July 1913 as Detective Inspector Y Division and joins the Port Authority Police at the same rank. Finally retires in 1924 In 1939 he and his wife lived at 55, Whitehall Road, in the Grays area of London. Alfred was then working as a Private Enquiries Agent. It is believed that he died in the Battersea area of London in 1946. Entitled to 1897 Jubilee Medal as PC D Division, 1902 as PS D Division. PC Scholes was just six months into his career with Scotland Yard when he, along with hundreds of other officers, were drafted into the dangerous and dark slums of Whitechapel to hunt for the killer that had been dubbed ‘Jack the Ripper.’ In his memoirs he recalls numerous occasions that he stopped and questioned innocent pedestrians, and led to comparative safety the many ‘fallen’ women who ran into his arms convinced that they had met ‘Jack’ and were next to be slaughtered. It is hard today to imagine the Whitechapel of 1888, with its narrow, unlighted streets, dirty alleys and slum buildings that housed some of London’s most unfortunate and desperate people. It was also a world of multiple races and nationalities all squeezed into a small, heavily populated district. It is also hard to imagine the terror that gripped the people of this poor part of London, and the terror and fear that swept the country as a whole. People genuinely feared for their lives and at the height of the scare, around September and October 1888, the streets of Whitechapel became deserted. Old Bailey pages Famous cases from the book Housebreaking - 8th February 1897 as a Detective in G Division https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18970208-213&div=t18970208-213&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Robbery - 25th February 1901 as a Sergeant in D Division https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19010225-213&div=t19010225-213&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Robbery - 25th March 1901 as a Sergeant in D Division https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19020310-260&div=t19020310-260&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Libel - 10th March 1902 as a Sergeant in D Divison https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19020310-260&div=t19020310-260&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Forgery 3rd April 1905 as a Sergeant https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19050403-301&div=t19050403-301&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Theft 11th September 1906 as a Sgt in D Division https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19060911-99&div=t19060911-99&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Fraud 21st October 1910 as a Sgt G Division https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19100208-35&div=t19100208-35&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Forgery 31st May 1910 as a Sgt https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19100531-21&div=t19100531-21&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Murder 28th March 1911 as an Insp https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19110328-46&div=t19110328-46&terms=Alfred Sholes#highlight Theft 7th November 1911 as an Insp https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19111107-48&div=t19111107-48&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Theft 30th January 1912 as an Insp Y Division https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19120130-33&div=t19120130-33&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight Fraud 4th February 1913 as an Insp https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19130204-32&div=t19130204-32&terms=Albert Scholes#highlight Theft 4th March 1913 as an Insp https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19130304-65&div=t19130304-65&terms=Alfred Scholes#highlight http://www.gsburroughs.com/current-book/
  23. Final auction prices for these medallions.............
  24. 1851 Great Exhibition in the Crystal Palace Medal, to Police Constable Thomas Spiller. Thomas Spiller - 1851 census St Luke's 1861 census Clerkenwell both on G Division. His collar number in 1851 was 428G. Spiller's warrant number was 25269. He died on the 14th January 1864 with the rank of Inspector G Division. 1851 Great Exhibition in the Crystal Palace Medal to Police Constable John Shepperd. John Sheppard (note spelling of surname) 1851 census Bermondsey. M Division. Collar number 768M
  25. bigjarofwasps

    Various nationality medallions

    That's the one that caught my eye as well. Sure I've seen one before, but I can't for the life of me remember what it was for.
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