Jump to content
Gentleman's Military Interest Club

servicepub

Silver Membership
  • Content count

    195
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Everything posted by servicepub

  1. Although I am mostly a headdress collector a couple of years ago I found myself leaning towards pre-1914 uniforms of the Canadian Militia. Here are a few of my favourites in the collection. First up, a Corporal of the 15th (Alberta) Light Horse, ca. 1907 15th (Alberta) Light Horse bandsman. 19th Light Horse officer's tunic 95th Rifles officer's tunic Canadian Engineer's Pattern 1896 frock. Governor-General's Foot Guards Pattern 1896 frock with buttons in pairs (a la Coldstream Guards, the Allied Regiment). Ca. 1903 Pattern 1896 frock for Infantry. 5th Royal Highlanders of Canada doublet for Other Ranks.
  2. Spurred on by Stuart and by viewing the fabulous collections of other GMIC members I thought that I would post some photos of my modest accumulation First, some of my helmets; A steel helmet to the Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians). A steel helmet was only approved for a short period in the early 1900s. By 1907 only the brass helmet was authorised for this regiment.
  3. A few more. A Lieutenant's tunic for the Corps of Guides, ca. 1913 A Cavalry frock. Artillery frock Bandsman A Rifle regiment frock to a Quartermaster-Sergeant of the 20th Halton Rifles.
  4. The six points of the Star represents the provinces of Canada at the time of the Regiment's formation - 1872. This is the first time I had seen this badge so large as it was a common collar badge.
  5. It has been a while since I last posted and thought that I would share a recent acquisition. This cap, circa 1880, to a Colour-Sergeant of the Governor-General's Foot Guards - an Ottawa, Ontario based regiment, was found by a friend at an estate sale in Phoenix, Arizona. It was advertised as an "Eastern Star, Masonic Order Lad's Cap". It shows that rare items can show up anywhere. A corner of my basement. I couldn't resist adding the caption to the photo.
  6. It has been a while since I last posted and thought that I would share a recent acquisition. This cap, circa 1880, to a Colour-Sergeant of the Governor-General's Foot Guards - an Ottawa, Ontario based regiment, was found by a friend at an estate sale in Phoenix, Arizona. It was advertised as an "Eastern Star, Masonic Order Lad's Cap". It shows that rare items can show up anywhere.
  7. ​I can only suggest that this is Australian (where the tendency is to have things reversed - like toilet bowl flows and seasons). Below is a Canadian example which follows the prescribed rules.
  8. An article on Canadian Wolseleys. https://servicepub.wordpress.com/2013/09/02/regimental-identity-and-the-20th-century-khaki-helmet/
  9. A khaki Wolseley flashed to The RCR.
  10. A recent acquisition. Royal Canadian Artillery
  11. Andy, I have only ever seen one Wolseley with a removable pugaree. In this case to The Royal Canadian Regiment.
  12. Stuart, I missed your query about the Hawley helmet. As an economy measure the US Hawley fibre helmet was adopted (around 1938) for Other Ranks of the Canadian Army. Officers were still expected to acquire the Wolseley. Hawley established a plant in Canada and produced hundreds of thousands of these and they were issued throughout the Canadian Army (in Canada and not to the Active Service Force). Nonetheless, many officers also bought these on repayment from Stores. Below is a Hawley helmet flashed to the Toronto Regiment. The use of embellishments was strictly forbidden however.
  13. A crass, self-serving commercial plug for a recent book that I co-authored. Available from Service Publications at www.servicepub.com
  14. An interesting article on sabretaches - http://servicepub.wordpress.com/2014/09/25/the-sabretache-in-the-canadian-cavalry/ (not to hijack this headdress thread.) Clive
  15. An interesting article on sabretaches. http://servicepub.wordpress.com/2014/09/25/the-sabretache-in-the-canadian-cavalry/
  16. Ah yes, collecting Wolseleys. Welcome to the dark side.
  17. None. The RCR wore the Canadian Maple Leaf badge, on a khaki cover, on the left side of the helmet. Clive
  18. More likely the reverse - a British officer serving at First Canadian Army, possibly AGRA (Army Group Royal Artillery (although the term applied equally to RCA)). A formation patch was not indicative of the wearer's nationality. Clive
  19. This is a photo of a great aunt of mine. She was a nurse in the AEF and I have identified the medal as the American Red Cross medal for 12 months service overseas. Of the two ribbons the second appears to be the Veterans of Foreign Wars ribbon, however, I am stumped on the first ribbon which doesn't look like the 'watered' ribbon of the WWI Victory Medal. Any ideas?
  20. Sorry for the cross-posting as I put this in the US Medals section yesterday. However, it appears that this is the better thread for my question. The attached photo shows a family member, a nurse in the AEF. The Red Cross medal and the second ribbon have been identified (12 months overseas service and the Veteran of Foreign Wars, respectively). I wonder if the first ribbon is not the short-lived 'original' design? Any thoughts? Clive
  21. I have always believed that it is better for the vet to sell his/her own medals and profit from them, than to leave them to uninterested family who will pocket the cash.
×