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Noor

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Everything posted by Noor

  1. Hi, I got yesterday this Austrian Military Merit Cross (Militärverdienstkreuz) and would like to know who was maker "E"? Like I understand second award clasp on the ribbon is pretty common thing?
  2. Hi guys, Here is my today's arrivals - all nice U.S. ribbon bars. But because I don't know much about that area, can you please have a look, confirm that I got ribbons right, help to ID some and if you don't mind, please feel free to add some extra information about them. Ok, lets start.... Bar No. 1 Nice 13 award ribbons/5 row bar on the felt. I presume this owner was officer, am I correct? Awards; 1. Legion of Merit (??????) 2. Silver Star 3. Bronze Star 4. Army Commendation Medal 5. Army Good Conduct Medal 6. American Defence Service Medal 7. American Campaign Medal 8. European - Africa - Middle Eastern Campaign Medal (Star on it means battles?) 9. World War II Victory Medal 10. Army of Occupation Medal 11. National Defence Service Medal (what this leave indicate?) 12. Korean Service Medal with two stars (Stars again?) 13. United Nations Service Medal (for Korea?)
  3. Hi all, Is there any way to trace a soldier from the South African forces as well? I am trying to find out anything about Gunner R.A.SIMPSON who served in South African Field Artillery (S.A.F.A.). Any advice would be great, Thanks, Timo
  4. Hi all, I rarely find time to post here something so I decided to do it now. Please find one nice China War medal below that I picked up yesterday. Finished initial research today and I am delighted about the amount of information was available of him: James Henry Gordon Casserly (25th July 1869 – 7th April 1947) Lieutenant Colonel 120th Rajputana Infantry / 20th Regiment, Bombay Infantry Honorary Commander of the United Arts Rifles James was born 25th August 1869 as a son of James Henry Casserly and Maria Rourke. At that time they lived in 1 Chatham Street, Dublin. This property was owned by Casserly family at least from 1853. Up to 1887 there was a pub called “Casserly Travern”. The pub called “Neary’s pub” can be traced back to 1887 when Thomas Neary was the proprietor and the name has stayed with the bar ever since. Even today there are some old belongings from that period in this old pub in Dublin city centre. Young age James studied in the Trinity College. He passed his final exams on 1889 based on the Daily Express, 15th November 1889 list. Then he was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant into the 4th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He was promoted on the 23rd April 1890 to the rank Lieutenant serving in the 4th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers 23 April 1890. 4th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers was a City of Dublin Militia unit and from that, on the 10th October 1891 he was commissioned into the Northamptonshire Regiment as a Second Lieutenant for regular service. Shortly after that transfer he travelled to India with the unit. Two years later he was transferred to the Indian Army on the 5th June 1893 as a Lieutenant. Lieutenant Casserly was appointed to the 20th Regiment of Bombay Infantry on the 27th February 1897. During that time he was two years a Commandant of outpost near Himalayas called Buxa Duar which guards the pass into India from Bhutan. Based on his experience there he wrote later on one of his well-known books “Life in an Indian Outpost”. He describes the daily incidents of social and political life in an isolated station, varied by sporting expeditions and visits to Darjeeling. Forest Lodge the Second, which was built after a destructive elephant had ruined the first house in the trees. From “Life in an Indian Outpost” by Major Gordon Casserly Few years later he became a double company commander with 20th Regiment of Bombay Infantry on the 4th August 1900. He was attached to the 22nd Regiment of Bombay Infantry 2nd July 1900 and is noted as being employed as a Company Officer but also in charge of the depot of the Hong Kong Regiment according to the January 1901 Indian Army List. The 22nd Regiment served on the China 1900 campaign – it was their first battle honour. Within the China Expeditionary Force the 22nd Bombay (Native ) Infantry was listed as comprising 13 British Officers,17 Native Officers and Hospital Assistants, 721 NCOs and men, 59 Public followers, 35 Private followers, with 13 officers chargers and 8 ponies. In their attached transport detail they had 108 pack mules with 2 Jemadars and 4 Daffudars and 36 Drivers. The bulk of the Regiment were at Hong Kong as Garrison Troops but on the 9th June 1900 the HQ Wing embarked at Calcutta on the m.v.Patiala arriving on the 24th July 1900. It would appear that they did not deploy to North China and remained in Hong Kong as Garrison troops. After tour in China during the Boxer Rebellion he was promoted to the rank of Captain on the 10th July 1901. In 1903 the regiment name had changed to 120th Rajputana Infantry. After six years of service he was promoted once again to the rank of Major on the 10th October 1909. In the January & April 1915 Indian Army List he is noted as being on leave, outside of India on a medical certificate from 28 November 1913 and this had been extended 6 months. The 120th Rajputana Infantry went to Mesopotamia in November 1914 as part of the original expeditionary force and ultimately forced to surrender at the fall of Kut in April 1916. However it does not look like he was with them. Instead Belfast News from 13th April 1914 shows that at that time he published one of his first books; “Mr. Werner Laurie is just publishing “Life in an Indian Outpost” by Major Casserly. This is a thrilling account of the life of an Indian officer in command of a native garrison in a small post on the frontier. The outpost is called Buxa Duar, and is on the face of the Himalayas, guarding one of the Gates of India. The book gives a wonderfully vivid idea of the peculiarity and loneliness and risks of such a life. Major Casserly tells his story in a manly, straightforward, and direct way, and the book will appeal to all lovers of sport and daring.” In the July 1915 Army List is noted as being on leave, outside of India on a medical certificate 1 year 8 months. Probably due to his age and ill-health he was transferred to the Half-Pay List on the 28th November 1915 (LG 4 Feb 1916) In the January 1916 Army List is still noted as being on leave, outside of India on a medical certificate. On 10th January 1916 he received a Special Appointment, graded as a Staff Captain (LG 27th January 1916) but in the same year he retired as a Major due to ill-health on 11th October 1916 (LG 1 Dec 1916). In the Indian Army List he was classed as Major retired but liable to be recalled to active service until 1919 (Jan 1919 IAL). Major Casserly was promoted to the rank Lieutenant Colonel on 14th November 1919 on the retired list in accordance with, the provisions of A.C.I. 644 .and 1213 of 1918 the London Gazette 17th February 1920. In the same date he became a Battalion Commander of 14th County of London Volunteers Regiment. Also he became a Honorary Commander of the United Arts Rifles. In the Great War Major Casserly didn’t take actively part of the war overseas, therefore 1900 China Campaign medal is his sole entitlement. Colonel Gordon Casserly, how people know him, was a life member of the Société de Géographie d'Alger. Also he was a British Consul St.Moritz 1916-1917. He published following books: Novels “The Elephant God” “The Jungle Girl” (1922) “The Red Marshal” (1920) “The Desert Lovers” “The Sands of Death” “The Monkey God” (1929) “Tiger Girl” “Love’s Lottery” (1938) Short stories “Daughter of Eve” Travel “The Land of the Boxers” “Algeria To-day” (1928) “Tripolitania” (1925) “Life in an Indian Outpost” (1914) Nature “Dwellers in the Jungle” (1925) “In the Green Jungle” (1927) Play “Bubbies and the Don” One-act plays “The Idol” “The Test” “Lady Hamilton” “The Fatal Empress” “The Lunatic” Military “Jungle and River Warfare” (1914) “Training of the Volunteers for War” “Tactics for Beginners” “Company Training” “Trench Warfare”
  5. Hi all, I am trying to research two medals that I have here. If any of you have some information about this man below or can add here some facts that would suite into my initial text, please let me know. Also, is it possible to confirm what another medals he was entitled (I know missing Victory medal). Finally, how much usually WW2 period SAAF cap badges cost? I am looking one for a display with his medals. Victor Albert Donnolly (1897 – 31.03.1943) Captain WW1 SA Irish regiment and 2nd CC corps WW2 South African Air Force Victor Albert Donnolly was son of Robert and Harriet I. C. Donnolly. He was married with Ruby Donnolly, of Bloemfontein, Orange Free State, South Africa. Victor saw service with the SA Irish Regiment and 2nd CC corps as a NCO. He later on joined the South African Air Force (SAAF) after it was established at the 1 February 1920. He had a very low service number P/204 that I presume indicates early recruitment. He was commissioned and rose to the rank of Captain. He died when he fell out of Hawker Hartbees aeroplane during thest flight near Eastleigh Nairobi in 31 March 1943. He is buried in the Nairobi War Cemetery.
  6. Hi all, Over the trade I picked up some random medals including two South African WW1 awards (BWM and VM) named to PTE.G.H.HAWKINS KALAHARI HRS. Sad part is that I can see his trio was on sale some years ago on eBay with the 1915 Star. Now its only a pair (at least star must be out there somewhere). I am just wondering how rare unit it is and is there any information where they were and what they did during the WW1. Not my cup of tea so most likely I will move them on some moment soon. Just wanted to use them as a learning pieces first. Thanking you in advance, Timo
  7. Hi all, I just bought another medal for my humble collection and I desperately would like to find a copy of owners photo. Also any extra information about him and his service would be greatly appreciated. Especially any extra information from the Afghanistan campaign. So far I have information below: James Agnew McNeale (27th December 1843 – 13th August 1901) Lieutenant Colonel Commandant of 8th Bengal Cavalry James Agnew McNeale was born in Belfast in 1843, the son of John McNeale of Parkmount, Rush Park, Co. Antrim. In young age James studied in the Berkeley Villa School in Cheltenham, England. The school gave him a very good testimonial of his characteristics. Also he studied a period of time in W.Fraderick 2 Rue de Calais du Roule, Paris, France. He received a nomination for the Royal Indian Military College (Addiscombe Military Seminary) on 28th May 1860. It cost about £300 to put a young gentleman through the course. As usual with 19th century educational institutions, the pupils led a tough existence, which might have helped them to cope with the hard career path they had chosen in India. They also learned Indian languages which were essential if they were to successfully command native infantry, cavalry and engineer units. The college closed in 1861 so he must been one of the last ones who studied in there. After one year of study he was appointed as an Ensign in the Bengal Infantry on 8th June 1861. In following year he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant 30th July 1862. Following promotion took place after 8 years when he received a rank of Captain on the 9th May 1870, also he became a Third Squadron Commander, 8th Regiment, Bengal Cavalry (Formerly 18th Irregular Cavalry). James must been regularly visiting home because he played cricket for Ireland in a crushing defeat by the MCC in 1871 at College Park, Dublin. On the 13th February 1873 James got married with Amelia Lucy Luard in Meerut. She was a daughter of Colonel Peter William Luard, 55th Native infantry. Luard served with the Army of the Sutlej in 1846. Commanded the 17th Punjab Infantry after the Mutiny of the 55th Native Infantry, with the Saugor Field Brigade under Brigadier Wheeler in 1859. A year later, 7th January 1874 their daughter Emily Ida McNeale was born at Meerut, India. She lived in India all of her young age, until moved back to England with her mother in 1906. Following year newspaper “The Homeward Mail” lists that on 11 May 1875 a son John Hugh McNeale was born to them as well at Peshawur, North-West Province. United Kingdom 1881 Census shows that he was visiting Cheltenham with Mother and sister. Father, James Agnew McNeale, remains in India. He studied in Clifton Collage 1889-90. John joined with India Police Department 21st October 1895 and was posted as Assistant District Superintendent., Central Provost and promoted to District Superintendent June 1903. He retired September 1924. John moved back to England and he dies in Cheltenham 1956. When the Second Anglo – Afghan war started then Captain McNeale was sent to there. 8th Bengal Cavalry was attached under Kandahar Field Force, 1st Division, Cavalry Brigade under command of Brigadier General Walter Frane. Kandahar Field Force had one of the most difficult and daunting task to clear and pass the valleys up to the city of Kandahar. When the Peshawar and Kurram Field Forces were able support each other and indeed eventually met up then the Kandahar Field Force was virtually cut off from the rest of the campaign and had to support itself autonomously for the entire course of the campaign. This column did not face the same kind of large scale resistance as the other two columns did, but suffered from a potentially far more paralysing problem for the force; supply. The Kandahar Field Force animals were dying in their hundreds and thousands in the difficult terrain and with the worsening weather conditions. Added to this, was the fact that the local tribes were quite happy to prey on any group of carts that did not look sufficiently well defended. Despite all the problems, on the 8th January 1879 Kandahar Field Force enters into the city. James got promoted again on 8th June 1881 when he became a Major. He was still holding a position as a Squadron Commander, 8th Bengal Cavalry. Finally he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and he held a position of Commandant in the 8th Bengal Cavalry on 8th June 1887. At that time service in India was uneventful. June 1894 8th Bengal Cavalry paraded under command of Colonel McNeale for Queen-Empress seventy-fifth birthday at Allahabad, a city in Uttar Pradesh state, north India. A salute of thirty-one guns and the feux-de-joie being fired, after which the flag was saluted and three cheers were given for her Majesty. Lieutenant Colonel McNeale retired in 1898 after 38 years of service with the colours. Sadly he wasn’t able to enjoy his well-earned retirement long because James McNeale died only aged 57, in India on 13th August 1901 and he is buried in Gulmarg. His headstone inscription reads "In loving memory of Col. James Agnew McNeale, Genl. List Infantry, Late of the 8th Bengal Lancers, who died at Gulmarg August 13th, 1901. Aged 57 years." Widow, Amelia and daughter Emily, proceed to England on February 1906. She lived with their daughter in Gloucester and passed away 1929.
  8. Thanks Brett. Hopefully more will be found about him! Sadly I am stuck with the research at the moment. Timo
  9. Hi all, Can anybody help me to identify this chap neck order and breast star please. Medal on his chest must be Indian Mutiny medal. I am thinking something from Vatican/order of St.John knights of Malta or even Brunswick House Order of Henry the Lion? Any ideas would be great help, Noor
  10. Hi all, Sorry about my stupid question again. I try to study ribbon and medal bars and one another question arise. What colors was on use and is there any spesific ones, what can match with exact branch. Like I got this nice three place Bavaria ribbon bar and there is used blue cloth backing. Is it mean that this bar was only for the Imperial Navy? Also is there any lists, what color backings different makers used? Also was there makers who made medal or ribbon bars just for a Navy or Army. Oh, lots of questions again. I hope someone can advise me a little Regards, Noor
  11. Hi all, Can anybody help me to identify this chap neck order and breast star please. Medal on his chest must be Indian Mutiny medal. I am thinking something from Vatican/order of St.John knights of Malta or even Brunswick House Order of Henry the Lion? Any ideas would be great help, Noor
  12. Hi all, I have here one 15 Star that is named to SA unit Barkley West Comando. Just wanted to check are these awards researchable because I wasn't able to find anything of him. Star is named to "PTE G.H.HAWKINS BARKLEY W CDO" Thanking you in advance, Timo
  13. Hi all, I have here another random medal that I would like to research a little before I move it on. Unfortunately somehow medals to an officers that I have got have all some African connection :). Now, I have here a Victory medal to Lieutenant Donald J Waters. His medal index card shows that he was in General List, Highland Light Infantry and then with 3rd Battalion Nigerian Regiment. London Gazette shows that he was attached to West African Frontier Force from 1st October 1915. He landed in Africa 3rd October 1915 (MIC - zone 4C). He relinquish commission from West African Frontier Force and was granted rank Captain on 25th June 1919. I wasn't able to find anything else about him. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Timo
  14. Spanish American War Spanish Campaign Army Service Medal Hi guys, I picked up this set today and I would like to know few things.... The medal and ribbon looks prefect condition - up to what time they made these numbered? Also is these medals trackable based on the number on the rim (mine No. 24843)? My last question - what would be fair market value of this set? box pins and buttonaire medal reverse (I forgot to make a picture of front) number on the rim
  15. THIS ADVERT HAS EXPIRED!

    • FOR SALE
    • ORIGINAL/AUTHENTIC

    Hi all,Following medals are looking new home. All of them are in good condition, namings are original and nothing is messed around with them (RN LSGC medal has only modern replacement ribbon).1. Royal Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal. 205365 Petty Officer Patrick Cleary, HMS Roxburgh. From Cork, Ireland. Most of the war he served on HMS Roxburgh and therefore save some action. As an example: HM Roxburgh captured a German merchantman on 6 August 1914. Refitted January 1915; hit by torpedo from U 39 on 20 June 1915 but escaped with serious damage to bow. After repairs completed in April 1916 served in Norwegian waters. To North America and West Indies Station from September 1916 until Armistice, and while escorting a convoy off Northern Ireland on 12 February 1918 rammed and sank U 89. His Victory medal was up on sale on ebay just a month ago, so perhaps even partial re-unite is possible.Price : £952. Victory medal. S/6469 Stoker Mathew McBride, Royal Navy ReserveHe was from Dublin. Served in the RNR - on board HMS Isonzo and HMS Monas Isle. 1911 Irish Census shows him as a Railways Signal Fitter. Comes with the copy of rating card.Price : £173. Victory medal. 10610 Private Michael O'Connell, South Wales Borderers. Originally from Cork, Ireland. Later served as well Welsh Regiment, Labour Corps and Royal Engineers. He landed in France 13 September 1914 and became entitled 14 Star trio + Silver War badge. He was discharged 27 July 1917 due to the wounds. He was 48 years of age when he left from service. His trade of his service papers was seaman.Price: £204. British War medal and Victory medal. 152846 Gunner Sidney URMSON, Royal Artillery.I haven't done much research on him (just Medal Index Card that confirms that this pair was his full entitlement and that he served in Royal Field Artillery and medal roll page). But because unusual name I am sure this will be easy and interesting research.Price: £305. Victory Medal. Captain Francis Haywood FLOYD, Royal Engineers. Landed in France June 1916 and became entitled to British War Medal and Victory Medal. During the war he was Mentioned in Despatches and therefore he was actually entitled to wear a MID device (oakleaf) on the Victory Medal ribbon (missing). He relinquish his service December 1921. Floyd was an architect at 18 Market Place, Newbury, 1915-1931Price: £356. Victory medal. 64344 Private George Davis, Liverpool Regiment.Entitled British War medal and Victory medal. Later on transferred into the Labour Corps 265592.Price: £15 Or take them all as a lot for £180

    £180.00

  16. Hi all, I have here one nice George V Efficiency medal with the "Territorial" scroll. Medal was awarded to "5377520 GNR.S.H.G.ELLIOTT RA". Thank you to the help of other forum member, I was pointed out that he was a POW during WW2. Can someone please advise how I can research this man's service and also what else he was entitled to in order to get his set together? I was initially thinking that because George V period medal, he had service in the WW1 instead. Any help and ideas would be great! Timo aka Noor S. H. G. Last name Elliott Service number 5377520 Prisoner of war number 4151 Rank Lance Corporal Regiment The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry Camp type STALAG Camp number 20A Camp location Thorn Podgorz
  17. Hi guys, I can't find much information about this medal and would need some help. Like I understand it is Imperial Russian Medal "50 Years Sevastopol Defense 1855-1905". But who was entitled for that? I presume army and not civilians or bronze went for civilians as well? Also what kind a ribbon this medal used? I will post better pictures when the item is arrived. Thanks for your help guys in advance!
  18. Hi Brett, Thank you so much for your help! As I said, I picked this medal up only because to challenge and learn research possibilities regarding SA officer and after that I most likely let it go then. Therefore I do not start seeking a researcher who can dig more out for me from the archive. But because his interesting name, I was able already get some info of him from the main online research sites. Once again, thank you for your help and inputs - it has been a good guide for me. Talk you soon, Timo
  19. Thanks Brett! I got one copied page with the medal - confirms his rank, first name, unit, 1915 Star entitlement and also when he served in SW Africa. Also using internet, I was able to confirm this info: First served in Matabele Wars (1893-1897) with the B. B. Police, Mafeking (medal roll). His regimental number was 1384 and he was entitled the campaign medal with the Shangani and Singuesi clasps. Then as a Sergeant-Major in Cape Police. He received QSA with the clasps “Defence of Kimberley” and “Orange Free State”. He was commissioned 4th January 1901. Worked in Cape Mounted Police (1910). Married with Rosa Beatrice Watermeyer (nee du Preez). Resided Barkly West. Daughter Wilhelmina Emily was born 04.07.1909 and son James Frederick 1913. Served as a Captain in the 5th South Africa Mounted Rifles, Cape Mounted Police (CMP) based in Kimberley. He saw active service in South West Africa from 23rd August 1914 until 9th July 1915.
  20. I push this old post up - I randomly picked up a British War Medal that was named to "T/CAPT F.E. WATERMEYER" . Turns out that Frederick Edward (Frederick Egidius Benedictus) Watermeyer worked for Cape Mounted Police (1910). He was married with Rosa Beatrica (nee du Preez) and they had at least two children. During the war Frederick served with the 5th Regiment South Africa Mounted Rifles in SW Africa 23.08.1914 - 09.07.1915. He was entitled at least 15 Star trio. No other awards are known to me at the moment. Can some of you advise where else I should look for information of him and his service? Thanks, Timo
  21. What it is?

    Hi all, I came across with this piece here in Dublin and because I don't know anything about the Masonic items, some advise would be greatly appreciated. My main questions are; what it is, from what period and is there any value? Thanking you in advance, Noor
  22. Hello all, I spotted this badge and I would like to find out what it is - does any of you have came across with this gold/green enamel badge before? It is shamrock shape, year 1916 and letters OT (any ideas what for these can be stand for?) Thanking you in advance, Noor
  23. Hi all, I haven't been around a long time because I gave up collecting and sold piece by piece my whole previous collection during 3 years back in college. But now I am graduated, started new career and also I am back in collecting from the scratch. I will start posting here new items that I have managed to pick up. Any questions, extra information, research ideas, etc, please do not hesitate to contact me! Thanks for looking, Timo aka Noor William John Winn (1877 – XXXX) 9511, Drummer, 5th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers - QSA (1st Drgn.Gds.) - Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, SA 1901, SA 1902 - Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal George V issue, 1st type 1911-1920 (9511 Corpl. W. Winn R.Dub.Fus) - Army Meritorious Service Medal George VI issue 'Fid.Def' obverse (9511 Sjt. W.J Winn R.Dub.F.) William was born in Hertfordshire at 1877 and he enlisted age 16 years and 6 months from Norwich 29th March 1894 into 1st Dragoon Guards. Private Winn service number was 3760. He stated his trade as a musician. William’s was 5 feet 3 inches high and he weight 119 lbs. He had brown eyes and brown hair. During his service met with Barbara Evans and they got married at Colchester on the 16th April 1898. William served in UK until 15th January 1901, when he was sent to the South African war. He stayed in there until 14th November 1903 and became entitled Queens South Africa Medal with the following clasps: Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, SA 1901, SA 1902. His service continued in home. On the 8th May 1905 their son Cyril Francis Winn born. Following year, on the 28th March 1906 he discharged after 12 years of service. Almost immediately he enlisted on the 4 May 1906 to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He was promoted to the rank Corporal on the 4th November 1911. Irish Census 1911 shows his family living in Beggars Bush Barracks in Dublin. Also this source shows one of the sad moment from his family life – as stated on the service papers, he had a son Cyril Francis but on the census form there is a remark that they had two children and only one is living. He received Long Service & Good Conduct medal on the 28 June 1912. Then next promotion to the rank Sergeant took place on the 9th August 1914. Finally on the 19th December 1918 he was elected under army order to receive Army pension while still serving (AO/1 of 1918). In total he served around 22 years. His rank is mentioned on the roll as a “Trumpeter Major”, so must likely he served whole time as a musician. Joseph Connell (1875 – XXXX) 6145, Private, 4 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers Joseph was born in St.Thomas Parish in Dublin at 1875. He enlisted to the 4th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers at the 21st June 1908. At that time he was already circa 33 years old. Before Joseph was sent to the war, his name appears in the Police Gazette 19 January 1915 as a deserter in Sittingbourne from his unit at the 16 January 1915. Most likely this took place on the way to Western front. He landed in France 10 February 1915. During his service in France, some moment he was transferred into the Labour Corps. His new service number was 51331. After the Great War Connell became entitled 15 Star trio. 6145 Pte J.Connell 4 R Dub Fus Awarded Special Reserve LS Medal AO Oct 1913. so not sure how he appears on a Militia LS Medal with EDV11 obverse. By 1913 I would think it should be GV obverse. Most likely this award on the picture was “own awarded” replacement. Naming is engraved and not stamped like it should be on the official medal. John Behan (1893 – 25.05.2015) 8710, Private, 4th Battalion Att to 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers John was born in Harold’s Cross, Dublin as a son of Martin and Maria Behan. Based on the 1911 Irish Census their family lived in Limekiln Lane, Rathmines/Rathgar. He had two brothers and two sisters. At this time John was Grocers Porter. Some moment around summer 1912 he enlisted to the 4th Battalion of Royal Dublin Fusiliers. At this time this was City of Dublin Militia unit and didn’t require full time service. His service number was 8710. When the Great War started, only 2nd Battalion from the Royal Dublin Fusiliers took part heavy fighting in France from 1914. They lost many men during the retreat as a POWs and also battle casualties were heavy. In order to compensate their losses, drafts from the militia units were sent in and attached to the front line units. Private John Behan was attached to the 2nd Battalion and landed in France on the 3rd May 1915. At that time his unit was in the Ypres Salient. Located half-a-mile north of Wieltje, originally a moated farm with outbuildings. It was first given the name 'Shell Trap Farm' by the British. The unhappy associations of this designation were held to be detrimental to the garrison's morale and the position was subsequently re-named by the Staff as 'Mouse Trap Farm'. On the morning of the attack on 24 May 1915 what was left of the farm after the bombardment ('a mere heap of mud and rubbish') was defended by two platoons of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers; being a mere 30 yards from the enemy trenches the rapid occupation of the farm by the quick-moving German infantry was little short of inevitable. The Royal Dublin Fusiliers started the day at Ypres on 24th May, 1915 with 666 men - by the end of the day they had lost 645 men, of whom 149 were listed dead. At 2:45 am the Germans launched a gas attack on the Allied lines which was the first time that the Germans had used poison gas on a large scale on the Western Front. The German poison gas came ‘drifting down wind in a solid bank some three miles in length and forty feet in depth, bleaching the grass, blighting the trees and leaving a broad scar of destruction behind it.’ By 9:30 pm, out of a battalion strength of 666 men, all that remained when the battalion ‘retired’ was one officer and twenty other ranks. For the record, in just eighteen and three quarter hours, the Dublin Fusiliers had suffered a loss of 645 men who were blown to bits, gassed, or driven insane by the effects of poisonous gas. The British at that time had no defences against gas attack, indeed the large-scale use of gas by the Germans on the Western Front had begun at Second Ypres. The 2nd Dublins Commanding Officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Loveband of Naas, died the following day. The Battalion did not take part in any more major battles for the rest of the year. John Behan was one of the men who got gassed. He was evacuated to the No.3 Gas Casualty Clearing Station but died day later on the 25 May 1915 age 22. He is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension (Nord). Engraved on Menin Gate Memorial are the names of 461 Royal Dublin Fusiliers killed during the Battles of Ypres. 143 of them are the names of Dublin Fusiliers belonging to the 2nd Battalion who died on the 24th of May 1915. John O’Brien (1882 – XXXX) 5764, Private, 4th Battalion City of Dublin Militia, Royal Dublin Fusiliers Because commonality of his name in Ireland, it is impossible to narrow him down, even using information from his service papers. It is possible to say only that John was born around 1882 in St.Mary’s parish in Dublin. He became regular labourer and he lived in 9 Denmark Road, Dublin. On the 18th February 1902 at age 20 he put forward an application to become Militia soldier with the City of Dublin Militia – 4th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Based on the medical examination John O’Brien was 5 feet and 3 ½ inches tall. He weight 112 lbs. His eyes were grey and hair dark brown. Obviously he was Roman Catholic. He was attached to the battalion and already on the 10 March 1902 he embarked to the war in South Africa. He arrived to there on the 27th March 1902. During this phase of the war a larger scale battles were over and units were manning blockhouses in order to restrict the movement of the Boer guerrillas. This phase of the war also saw the use of mounted infantry companies and among them was the Dublin Fusiliers Mounted Infantry unit, which hunted down small groups of Boers, including the hunt for the prominent Boer officer, Christian De Wet. The conflict ended when the last of the Boers surrendered in May 1902 followed by the Treaty of Vereeniging. During the war, volunteers from the three militia battalions of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers had been used to provide reinforcements for the two regular battalions fighting in South Africa. Private O’Brien served in South Africa until 3rd October 1902 when he embarked back home. For his service, he received Queen South Africa medal with the clasps “South Africa 1902”, “Orange Free State” and “Cape Colony”. Also he received South Africa war gratitude £5. After the war John O’Brien worked for Mr. Johnston from 102 Capel Street, Dublin. But looks like John wanted to become a full time regular soldier. He volunteered for a service to the Royal Irish Fusiliers on the 2nd February. His employer gave a good reference and also militia papers are stating that his character was good. James Gaffney (1868 – xxxx) 3251, Private, 5th (County of Dublin Militia) Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers James was born in Dublin c. 1868 in St. Paul’s parish in Dublin. He lived in 139 Kings Street. James Gaffney enlisted on the 27th May 1895 into Royal Dublin Fusiliers 5th Battalion (County of Dublin Militia). He was at that time 27 years old. Medical examination sheet describes him 5 feet and 8 ¾ inches tall, brown hair and blue eyes. He attended following years for annual training and was sent to militia reserve 24 June 1898. He re-engaged for militia service again. When the Boer war started, he was embarked to South Africa on the 5th December 1899. He arrived 14 February 1900 and served in there until 25th February 1902. James was finally discharged 26th May 1903. Unfortunately I haven’t had luck to locate any extra information about him. On his papers there is a note that 1904 his address was 11 Healys Cottages, Francis Street, Dublin. J.Hoskins (xxxx – xxxx) 2888, Private, 4th (City of Dublin Militia) Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers Unfortunately I haven’t found out much about him. His service papers didn't survive. Medal roll shows that he was invalided 1900. He was entitled only QSA with the clasps; “Relief of Ladysmith”, “Orange Free State”, “Tugela Heights” and “Cape Colony”. Based on the clasps, it is possible to say that he was in South Africa at least December 1899 – February 1900 (Relief of Ladysmith and Tugela Heights). Because he was invalided, he was most likely evacuated before he became entitled KSA. Thomas Baker (1865 - 10 April 1941) 3907, Private, 4th (City of Dublin Militia) Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers Thomas was born circa 1865 in the Chapelizod parish in Dublin and also lived there. He was married and lived with his wife and children there. His wife’s name was Anne Traynor. In 1896, at the age of 31, Thomas Baker enlisted in the 4th. Battalion, the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. This was the old Dublin City Militia Battalion. However, this was not the first time that Baker served with the army. As younger man he previously served as a full time soldier with the 18th. Royal Irish Regiment. At the time of his joining the Dublin City miliita his papers show that he was 5ft.6 inches high, brown hair and blue eyes. Baker was a fine soldier, gaining good conduct pay and described as being a man of “good” character. At the outbreak of the Boer War in 1899, Private Thomas Baker was called up for full time service with the regular military forces and was posted to the 2nd. Battalion the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. In his papers an interesting letter written on his behalf by his commanding officer, gives some insight into Bakers previous service with the 18th. Royal Irish Regiment in which he earned two good conduct badges and was a man of very good character on his discharge from the Royal Irish. After his return from the Boer War in 1901, he continued to serve with the 4th. Bn. R.D.F. His day job was a farm labourer. He stayed with the 4th. Bn of the Dubs right up to 1912. By this time his family had grown, his wife is listed as living at the Bridge Inn Chapelizod and his children are named Anne, Ellen, Thomas, Joseph and John. It is likely that his wife may have worked in the bar at the Bridge Inn, though further research needs to be done here. His attestation papers showing that for the Royal Irish Regiment he joined at Clonmel in 1884. His death certificate as an army pensioner was located in this record. It shows that he died on 10th. April 1941 at St. Kevin’s Hospital Dublin. His weekly pension at that time was 10 shillings. Baker was not satisfied to remain on retired pay and he enlisted again in 1917 serving in the Great War for 2 years. (France) For his Great War service (Labour Corps) he received the War & Victory Medals. His service records with the Royal Irish paint an interesting picture adding detail to this soldiers life. In the 1880’s he was admitted to hospital on a few occasions. Interestingly, on one such occasion he had been “accidentally stabbed by a comrade” He earned the 1854 India Medal with Hazara 1888 clasp while serving with the Royal Irish. Thomas Delaney (1896 – xxxx) 5614, Private, 3rd (Kildare Militia) Extra Reserve Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers Thomas was born around 1896 as a son of Francis and Hannah Delaney’s from 29 Chapel Street, Leighlinbridge, Co. Carlow. It is a small town on the River Barrow in County Carlow. His father was Malthouse Labourer and mother was looking after the kids. 1901 Census shows that they had all together 5 girls and 5 son’s in the family. Thomas was second youngest by age. But Thomas’ mother passed away around 1907-1911. On the 1911 Census, his father lives only with Thomas, one of the older sister and new sister Catherine, who must be born around 1907. Sadly father had been marked his marital status widower. Three years later when Thomas enlisted, his service papers are showing his Next-In-Kin address given still father Francis, Chapel Street, Leighlinbridge, County Carlow. He describes himself as 18 years old farm labourer from Carlow when he enlisted on the 16th May 1914 into Royal Dublin Fusiliers 3rd Battalion Extra Reserve. Already on the 8th August 1914 he was mobilised and attached to the 2nd Battalion. He was sent to 2nd battalion on the 1st April 1915. At that time his new unit was in France. Based on his service papers, Private Delaney received gunshot wound to the head on the 26 May 1915. At that period Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2nd Battalion just experienced horrific gas attack to their position on the “Mouse Trap Farm” area. This farm was located half a mile north of Wieltje. It was first given the name 'Shell Trap Farm' by the British. On the 24 May 1915 morning at 02:45 German launched heavy bombardment, involved the greatest use of chlorine gas to date, this time delivered with shells. The German gas came "drifting down wind in a solid bank some three miles in length and forty feet in depth, bleaching the grass, blighting the trees and leaving a broad scar of destruction behind it." Being a mere 30 yards from the enemy trenches the rapid occupation of the farm by the quick-moving German infantry was little short of inevitable. By 9:30 p.m., out of battalion strength of 666 men, all that remained when the battalion "retired" was one officer and twenty other ranks. The Royal Dublin Fusiliers had suffered a loss of 645 men who were blown to bits, gassed, or driven insane by the effects of poisonous gas. The 2nd Battalion commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Loveband, C.M.G, died the following day. The battalion did not take part in any more major battles for the rest of the year. Engraved on the Menin Gate Memorial there are 143 names from Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2nd Battalion who died on the 24th of May 1915. Mouse Trap Farm, 1915 Private Delaney, after initial recovery, was sent back home on the 18th July 1915 where he was discharged on the 18 November 1915. 24th October 1915 Irish Times published a list of wounded soldiers and Private Delaney’s name appears in the section named “wounded and suffering gas poisoning”. Thomas received King’s Certificate number 102/1519 for his service on the 16 June 1918. At that time he lived in Poe’s Hill road, Leighlinbridge. Unfortunately Thomas health was seriously damaged. He passed away on the 16th November 1925. His name appears on the Leighlinbridge/Old Leighlin Great War memorial. When he died he was only 27 (29) years of age. Carlow Great War Memorial Denis Fitzpatrick (1882 – XXXX) 4619, Private, 5th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers Denis was born at St.Pauls parish in Dublin around 1882. His father was James Fitzpatrick, who lived at 1900 on 16 Bloom Street, Manchester. When he enlisted for militia service Denis lived in 117 Francis Street, Dublin. His trade is recorded as cattleman. He enlisted into 5th Battalion (County of Dublin Militia) on the 3rd January 1900. Already on the 14th February he was embarked to South Africa. During his time in SA his unit had only minor engagements against the Boers but still they took some losses. Also diseases took its toll and as an extra, 5th Battalion had pretty bad luck with the summer thunderstorms when once a severe storm suddenly hit them when they were in the camp near Mafeking. One of the tent’s was hit by lightning, sheets of corrugated iron flew around and Colonel Gernon and Captain Baker together with many others, sustained very serious injuries. Before end of their time in SA, battalion stationed in Warrenton area, Northern Cape province. Denis was shipped back with the battalion to home on the25th February 1902 where the parade took place and the Duke of Connaught presented officers and men their medals. The 5th Battalion lost in total two officers and ten men killed, and eight wounded. Denis became entitled set of two medals: Queen South Africa Medal with the clasps “Transvaal”, “Orange Free State”, “Cape Colony” King’s South Africa medal with the clasp “South Africa 1901”, “South Africa 1902” Your collection is a class its own. I started collecting again from NIL medals this summer and I think can be proud what I have found so far. George Thompson 11544, Private, 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers George was most likely born in County Wicklow. ICRC papers are referring his next-of-kin address Mrs.Thompson, Rathnew, Co.Wicklow. Based on his service number, George enlisted to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2nd Battalion (nicknamed 'The Old Toughs') around summer 1913. When the Great War started, he was one of the main patches, who were sent to France in the end of August, 1914. Private George Thompson landed in Boulogne at 23rd August 1914. His unit saw action almost immediately in Belgium and lost large amount of officers and men killed wounded or more “lucky ones” found themselves as Prisoners of War (POW). This all happened due to the hectic retreat from Mons and Le Cateau area in Belgium where Dublin Fusiliers objective was to provide a rear guard force that would cover the retreating British Expeditionary Forces. George’s name appears on the 18th February 1915 Irish Times wounded list. He is mentioned again in the summer which indicates that his wounds weren’t too serious and he was back in his unit shortly afterwards. Most likely he was with his battalion when they experienced one of the most horrific events in the Great War – 24th May 1915 first poison gas attach at Ypres. At this time 2nd Battalion was in the area called “Shell Trap Farm” or like they start calling it later on “Mouse Trap Farm”. 24th May 1915 645 men were lost out of 666. This place was located half-a-mile North of Wieltje, originally a moated farm with outbuildings. It was first given the name 'Shell Trap Farm' by the British. The unhappy associations of this designation were held to be detrimental to the garrison's morale and the position was subsequently re-named by the Staff as 'Mouse Trap Farm'. On the morning of the attack on 24th May 1915 what was left of the farm after the bombardment ('a mere heap of mud and rubbish') was defended by two platoons of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers; being a mere 30 yards from the enemy trenches the rapid occupation of the farm by the quick-moving German infantry was little short of inevitable. At 2:45 am on the 24th of May, the Germans launched a gas attack on the Allied lines which was the first time that the Germans had used poison gas on a large scale on the Western Front. The German poison gas came ‘drifting down wind in a solid bank some three miles in length and forty feet in depth, bleaching the grass, blighting the trees and leaving a broad scar of destruction behind it.’ By 9:30 pm, out of battalion strength of 666 men, all that remained when the battalion ‘retired’ was one officer and twenty other ranks. For the record, in just eighteen and three quarter hours, the Dublin Fusiliers had suffered a loss of 645 men who were blown to bits, gassed, or driven insane by the effects of poisonous gas. The British at that time had no defences against gas attack; indeed the large-scale use of gas by the Germans on the Western Front had begun at Second Ypres. The Battalion did not take part in any more major battles for the rest of the year. Wounded private George Thompson was captured by Germans. He is first listed on the International Committee of Red Cross documents when his soldier’s pay book has been sent to the German records office as he is dead. This list has a stamp from 29th May 1915. Next record shows him as actually being at the field hospital Cologne (Feld Lazarett Köln) on 6th June 1915 and then being held at Siegburg prisoner’s camp, wounded left arm and thigh. In home, Irish Times recorded him as a “Missing” on the 23rd June 1915. There was a period when wounded prisoners were exchanged using a “parole system”, whereby the British authorities undertake not to return the man to the field against Germans. In those circumstances men were sent to garrison battalions that had no likelihood of facing German troops. When George arrived back to Ireland, he was transferred to the Royal Irish Fusiliers Garrison Battalion on the 1st January 1917. His new service number was given G/19555. After his full recovery, he was sent on to the Royal Field Artillery. New service number 268071. His move to the Royal Field Artillery might reflect him becoming medically fit again and perhaps able to be sent to another theatre of war, such as Salonika, or Mesopotamia where again he would not be breaching the terms of his parole. Charles Toomey (1872 – XXXX) 5698, Private, 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers Charles was born at Clonmurry, Kildare around 1872. He had two sisters Mary and Ester. Based on his medical examination description, he was 5 feet and 8 ¾ inches tall, 161 lbs. His eyes were grey and hair light brown. First served with the 3rd Battalion (Special Reserve) Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He enlisted at Naas 15th February 1896 for regular service. After initial training in the Naas depot, Private Toomey was posted to West Indies on the 5th October 1896. He was attached first to the 1st Battalion but soon after, on the 6th October he was transferred into 2nd Battalion. After a year service in India, he and his battalion left for Maritzburg, Natal, in 1897. During his service in South Africa, he was granted a good conduct pay on the 15th February 1898. The political situation had become so threatening by July, 1899, that the military authorities began to take precautionary measures, and the battalion was ordered to effect a partial mobilisation and to collect its transport. On September 20th it moved by train to Ladysmith and four days later proceeded to Glencoe. The 2nd battalion stationed at Dundee, along with the 1st Leicestershire Regiment, 1st King's Royal Rifle Corps, 18th Hussars, and the 13th, 67th, and 69th Batteries RFA, under Major-General Sir William Penn Symons. The country was still nominally at peace, but the Dundee force held itself ready for emergencies, and sent out mounted patrols by day and infantry piquets by night, while the important railway junction at Glencoe was held by a company. First battle where Private Toomey found himself was the Battle of Talana Hill, also known as the Battle of Glencoe. This was the first major clash of the Second Boer War. A frontal attack by British infantry supported by artillery drove Boers from a hilltop position, but the British suffered heavy casualties in the process, including their commanding general Sir William Penn Symons was mortally wounded. Soon after, with the rest of the troops, the 2nd Battalion retreated to Ladysmith. They were present in the action of Lombard's Kop on 30th October 1899 but were much split up, three companies acting as escort to artillery, one on outpost, etc. They did not suffer many casualties. On the same evening the battalion was "hurriedly entrained" and sent down the line to occupy Fort Wylie and protect the great bridge over the Tugela, but the advancing tide of Boer invasion soon lapped round them and they had to move still farther south. Three sections were in the unfortunate armoured train which was derailed on 15th November 1899. At Venter's Spruit on 20th January the 2nd Battalion and the three companies of the 1st Battalion were given under command of General Hart's force. In the fourteen days' fighting between 13th and 27th February General Hart's men were at first near the rail-head, and were brought down to Colenso village on the 20th. On the 23rd February order was received to attack the main Boer position. A short account of this action is given under the Inniskilling Fusiliers, who led in the assault, but the Connaught Rangers and 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers also pushed in close and lost most severely. During that attack a Colonel Sitwell was among the killed. The regiment was still to take part in another memorable assault before the close of the relief operations, being transferred to the command of General Barton for the last great effort on the 27th February, when Barton attacked and carried the eastern portion of Pieter's Hill. In addition to the Dublins his troops that day were the Royal Scots Fusiliers and the Royal Irish Fusiliers. The assault reflected credit on every one taking part in it, and gained the praise of General Buller. In the fourteen days' fighting the Royal Dublin Fusiliers losses were approximately 1 officer and 20 men killed, and 6 officers and over 100 men wounded. Eight officers and 7 non-commissioned officers and men of the 2nd Battalion were mentioned in General Buller's despatch of 30th March 1900, 5 of the latter being recommended for the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Among of the wounded was as well Private Charles Toomey, who received a gunshot wound to his chest on the 27th February 1900 at Pieter’s Hill. After initial recovery in South Africa, Charles was sent back in home on the 18th April 1900. 2nd Bn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers storming Talana Hill Due to his wounds, Private Charles Toomey was discharged from regular service at the 5th July 1901. Papers are showing that he experienced “Intercostal neuralgia” is caused by nerve compression in the abdominal area, which is the area by the ribcage. For his service in South Africa, Charles Toomey received Queen South Africa medal with following clasps: Talana - All troops under Lieut. General Sir.W.Penn Symon’s command on 20th Octber 1899 who were north of an east and west line drawn though Waschbank Station. Relief of Ladysmith - All troops in Natal north of and including Estcourt between 15th December 1899 and 28th February 1900 both dates inclusive Tugela Heights - All troops of the Natal Field Force exclusive of the Ladysmith garrison, employed in the operations north of an east and west line through Chieveley Station between the 14th and 27th February 1900 both dates inclusive and disk previously Patrick Moore (1875 - xxxx) 4855, Sergeant, 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers Patrick was born in Wicklow circa 1875. He enlisted 1893 age 18 and after initial training in depot, served in East Indies and South Africa. Promoted Corporal 1898 and Sergeant December 1899. He served whole Boer war and was present in Talana. For his war service, he received Queens South Africa medal with 6 clasps and King's South Africa medal with two clasps. Much more research must be done about this pair but I wanted to post it up first - nice Christmas present to myself;). Thomas Glynn (1882 – xxxx) 7169, Private, 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers Thomas was born 1882 in Rathwire, Mullingar, Westmeath. Attested for service with the Dublin Fusiliers on 12 June 1900 when he was 18 years old from Athlone. His trade was marked on his service papers as a labourer. Based on the medical examination sheet, he was 5 feet and 7 5/8 inches tall. He weighd 120 lbs and he had grey eyes and brown hair. He was posted first into the Royal Dublin Fusiliers Depot on the 24th June. After initial training he was transferred into the 1st Battalion on the 14th April 1901. At that time his new unit was in war at South Africa. The 1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers long continued to operate on the Natal-Transvaal border and on the lines of communication. One hundred and fifty men of the battalion were in the column of Colonel E C Knox in the first quarter of 1901—one of those columns which swept through the Eastern Tran The Mounted Infantry of the Dublin Fusiliers was represented in the little garrison of Fort Itala, which made such a splendid defence when the place was attacked by Botha with an overwhelming force on 26th September 1901. Major Chapman of the 1st Dublins, who commanded the garrison, received promotion. Lieutenant Lefroy and several non-commissioned officers and men were also mentioned in despatches by Lord Kitchener at the time for great gallantry. In the beginning of 1902 the 1st Battalion was moved west to Krugersdorp to relieve the 2nd Battalion. After the war in South Africa was over, 1st Battalion was moved to Malta on the end of 1902. One of them was as well Thomas, who left from there on the 2nd November 1902 and staid in Malta until 26th February 1903. Four companies were moved to Crete, including the one where Private Glynn served. He staid in Crete until 3rd March 1904 when companies were joined once again in Malta. The whole battalion occupied St George's Barracks Pembroke at that time but moved to Floriana Barracks in September 1905. The Royal Dublin Fusiliers developed an association with the Floriana Football Club which adopted the Irish green and white checkered shirt as their club colours. Thomas staid in there until Battalion was moved to Egypt. His service papers are showing that he was shipped to Egypt on the 6th November 1905 but most likely it took place on the 16th November instead on board the Assaye. This was routine for peace soldiering in Alexandria. On the 5th April 1907, Field-Marshall H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught visited Alexandria andpresented new Colours to the 1st Battalion. On the 17th June 1907 Private Glynn’s active service was almost in the end and he was sent back home to Army Reserve on the 18th June 1907. Towards the end of September 1907 orders were received for Headquarters and “A”, “C”, “F” and “H” companies were sent to Khartoum, the Sudan. In the meantime Thomas staid in the reserve until 11 June 1912 when he was discharged from service. For his service, Private Thomas Glynn was awarded Queen’s South Africa medal with three bars: Transvaal, SA 1901, SA 1902 Medal has interesting whole ribbon long metal plate with two loops for wear. So, obviously Private Glynn wore his medal with bride. Daniel Maher 15109, Private, 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers It is impossible to find out where Daniel was from because his name was too common at this period of time (and still is). There were records of 86 Daniel Maher’s in the 1911 Irish Census. When we are looking their age then around 28 of them were in the age to serve during the Great War. Daniel enlisted end of September 1914 into the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. After initial training with one of the Reserve Battalion he was sent on the 3rd May 1915 as reinforcement into 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. At this time his unit was holding a line in very dangerous place. Just 21 days after his arrival most likely Private Daniel Maher was involved one of the most horrific events in the Great War – 24th May 1915 first poison gas attach at Ypres. At this time 2nd Battalion was in the area called “Shell Trap Farm” or like they start calling it later on “Mouse Trap Farm”. At 2:45 am on the 24th of May, the Germans launched a gas attack on the Allied lines which was the first time that the Germans had used poison gas on a large scale on the Western Front. The German poison gas came ‘drifting down wind in a solid bank some three miles in length and forty feet in depth, bleaching the grass, blighting the trees and leaving a broad scar of destruction behind it.’ By 9:30 pm, out of battalion strength of 666 men, all that remained when the battalion ‘retired’ was one officer and twenty other ranks. For the record, in just eighteen and three quarter hours, the Dublin Fusiliers had suffered a loss of 645 men who were blown to bits, gassed, or driven insane by the effects of poisonous gas. The British at that time had no defences against gas attack. On the 24th October 1915 Irish Times his name appears on the list of soldiers who suffered gas poisoning. Most likely due to that he was discharged already same year on the 21st December 1915. Daniel Maher was entitled: - 1914/15 Star - British War Medal - Victory Medal Arthur Wilkins (20 December 1895 – Spring 1971) 14091, Private, 7th and 6th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers Arthur Wilkins was born at the 20 December 1895 in Marylebone, London. When the Great War started, he enlisted on the 4th September 1914 into Royal Dublin Fusiliers. On his service papers his trade is marked as a “metal worker mate”. Medical sheet describes him as a 5 feet and 5 inches tall, weight 126 lbs and eyes blue and brown hair. Private Wilkins was attached to the unit depot straightway. On the 18th September, he was transferred into 7th Battalion. Private Wilkins landed in Gallipoli on the 9 August 1915. Private Wilkins received gunshot wound to the right thigh and wrist on the 17 August 1915. Arthur was first evacuated to Alexandria and then on board H/S “Asturias” to UK. He arrived back home at 26 September 1915 25 September 1915 posted to regimental depot. 27 October 1915 posted to 3rd reserve battalion. 15 March 1916 attached to the 6th battalion that stationed in Balkans at this time. He joined battalion on the 6 April 1916 in Azrameri. On September 1917 6th Battalion was moved to Egypt for service in Palestine. On the 27 April 1918 they left the Division. On 3 July unit sailed from Alexandria, arriving Taranto five days later and then moving by train to France. Following 21 July 1918 they were transferred to 197th Brigade in 66th (2nd East Lancashire) Division. On the 29 February 1919 Arthur military service start became to the end and he was sent back to regimental depot. Following month, on the 28 March 1919 Private Wilkins was sent to Army Reserve Class B. He was Mentioned in Despatches (MID) on London gazette at the 9 July 1919 for his service in France. 1921 Arthur married with Eva B Keech. Medal entitlement: - 1914-15 Star - British War Medal - Victory Medal with Mentioned in Despatches (MID) oak leaf device Edward Walter Ekins 28873, Private, 7th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers Because Edward had almost unique name, then it was possible to narrow him down on the GB Census, calculating age +/- 20 in 1880 (service age during the Great War). There were two Edward W Ekins; one of them had middle name Ward and another middle name was Walter. Edward Ward from Surrey served with the Royal Artillery and was killed in action 1917. Therefore I can be sure that the owner of the medals was Edward Walter Ekins. Edward was born 1881 as a son of Walter Edward and Sarah Ekins in Blunham, Hertfordshire. 1911 Census shows that he was Servant Groom. He lived with his parents, 3 brothers and 2 sisters. His brother Jack was KIA in 1918 while serving with the Army Service Corps. Ten years later he married with Violet Elizabeth Mayers at age of 30 in 1911. At this time he resided in Welwyn village in Hertfordshire. At some point Edward joined to the Special Constabulary as a part-time volunteer Special Constable. Most likely under the combination of Great War service and regular long service criteria he became entitled a Special Constabulary medal. The medal may be awarded to Special Constables who were recommended by the Chief Officer of Police of the department in which they served for at least nine years and the war period was counted triple. This medal was instituted 30th August 1919 and shows his good conduct and that he returned back to England after the war. After the start of the Great War, Edward enlisted around February 1916. Most likely he was one of the many, who fell under the Military Service Act, which was introduced on 27th January 1916 by government after the Derby scheme was failed. All voluntary enlistment was stopped. All British males were now deemed to have enlisted on 2nd March 1916 and from 25th May onwards, all married men were included as well. Also conscripted men were no longer given a choice of which regiment they joined. That may explain as well how he ended up in the Irish unit, like many English men did after 1916. After initial training he was attached to the 7th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. It is impossible to determinate when this move took place. Similar patch of soldiers, with “close enough” service numbers, were transferred actually from the Royal Fusiliers formation. There is a possibly that as well Private Ekins received his initial training with them before the transfer to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. At this time, 1916-1917 7th Battalion served in Salonika and from September 1917 in Palestine as a part of 10th (Irish) Division. They were sent back to France on the 27th April 1918 from Alexandria, arriving Taranto five days later and then moving by train to France. They arrived to Marseilles on the 1st June 1918, where they were reduced to cadre on the 6th June 1918. Troops went to 2nd battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Probably at this time Private Edward W Ekins was transferred over to the 2nd Battalion as well. His new unit were transferred as Army Troops to Lines of Communication on the 16th June. A month later, on the 15th July 1918 they were transferred to 149th Brigade in 50th (Northumbrian) Division. Private Ekins wasn’t released to the reserve after the armistice was signed with Germany in a railroad carriage at Compiègne at 11th November 1918. Instead he was mentioned in the commander of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig submission of names at 16th March 1919, whose deserve a special mention (Mentioned in Despatches). His name was published in the London Gazette at 9th July 1919. In total, he was awarded: - British War Medal - Victory Medal with Mentioned in Despatches (MID) oak leaf device - Special Constabulary Medal (with the Great War clasp?) Edward died in Bedford on the 26th October 1965. He left £1941 to his wife, Violet Elizabeth Ekins. PS: BWM is replacement William Henry Aubin Croker (1852 – 17 June 1935) Captain (Honourably Major), 4th Battalion City of Dublin Militia Royal Dublin Fusiliers William Henry was born Beaufield, Moyacomb, Co.Wexford 1852. He was the oldest son of Henry Braddell Croker, a Captain of 57th Regiment (West Middlesex). The Croker’s are an Anglo-Irish landed gentry family. The best known branch of them was centred at Ballynagarde in County Limerick. Another branch provided Rt Hon John Wilson Croker sometime MP and secretary to the Admiralty. The name Croker is a variation of Crokker, Crocker or Crock and derives from the old English for potter. There were Crocks and Crockers in Ireland in medieval times. William was probably sent over to England in early age. Most likely he was educated there in some boarding schools in Worcester area. After his school years he was commissioned as Gentlemen to be Second Lieutenant in the Worcester Militia 3rd and 4th battalion. This was announced on the London Gazette 14th September 1877. Also 1878 Army list records him active in the same area Militia. Following year was important for him because William Henry married at Holy Trinity Church, Paddington on 25th June 1879 with Frances Augustine Pinon du Clos de Valmer. She was eldest daughter of the Viscomte Pinon du Clos de Valmer. His military career went smoothly and already 13th September 1879 he was promoted to the rank Lieutenant. Next promotion followed 27 June 1883, when he received a rank Captain. At this time he served with the 4th Battalion Worcester Militia. Some moment he moved back with his family to Ireland and settled in County Wexford. His name appears in many Irish Petty Sessions Court Registers over period of 1881 – 1896 and also 1903. Most of these cases were related to the property and usage of the Beaufield land, where Croker’s family resided. As an example, in one instance he sued a man who took four dead rabbits from his land. Also William must be into the horses and horse racing because August 1890 an Irish Times lists his name and his horse “Umrigar” as a participant in the competition. When the war in South Africa broke out, William Henry commissioned again. This time he started his service with the 4th battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, to where he was assigned as a Captain, announcement was published in the 22nd May 1900 in London Gazette. During his service in South Africa, he contracted some kind of disease and 5th July 1902 Irish Times shows his name on the dangerously ill officer’s list. 2 weeks later his name appears again but in this time there is a note about his condition and it says “improving”. After his service Captain Croker was entitled a Queen’s South Africa medal with the clasps “South Africa 1901”, “South Africa 1902”, Transvaal , Orange Free State , Cape Colony . Medal roll confirms that during his service in the war, he was attached to the Remount Depot. The Remount Department was set up in order to ensure the uniformity and suitability of the animals purchased for the army, and their training. During the Boer War 326,000 horses and 51,000 mules were lost, mainly through disease, so the animal establishment was increased after that. On the 21 December 1907 Captain William Henry Aubin Croker retired. Therefore he was granted a rank Honorary Major with the permission to wear the prescribed uniform. In the 1911 Irish census shows him and his wife living in Beaufield, Moyacomb, co.Wexford. They had two domestic servants. No children are showen. On the 8th June 1912 unfortunately William’s wife passed away. During the Great War William didn’t serve. In the 1916 an Irish Times has an advertisement with his name and it’s confirmed his address on Beaufield Mansion again. William Henry Aubin Croker died in his home 17th June 1935. His death was announced in Irish Times 19th June and he was buried on the 20th June next to his wife.
  24. My yesterdays pick-up. I am very pleased with this QSA (still researching his personal life): W. Brown (1873 – xxxx) 4352, Private, 1st Battalion (mounted infantry) Royal Dublin Fusiliers William Born was born in St.Mary’s parish in Cork around 1873. William joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers at Naas depot 9th February 1892. At that time he was 19 years old. Medical examination showed that he was 5 feet and 9 inches tall and weigh 133 pounds. On the 8th April same year he was posted to 1st Battalion. Private Brown had some problems at that time – on the 23 November 1893 he was awaiting a trial and he was convicted for thief on 18th January 1894. Hi service continued after 120 days punishment on the 18th May 1894. He served in Ireland until 1st May 1896. After that he was sent to South Africa where he staid following year till 1897. However, he must been a good soldier because 18th May 1896 he received a Good Conduct Badge. He must be part of 1st Battalion Mounted Infantry unit because when Ndebele people rose up against the rule of the British South Africa Company during Second Matableland War (also known as the Matableland Rebellion) and the group comprised of 31 men under the command of Captain Alexander john Godley (later a general and commander of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force) and Captain Arthur Forde Pilson where put together and sent as a part of British troops to Rhodesia. War broke out on 17 June 1896 at Mazowe with an attack by the Hwata dynasty on Alice Mine. This was followed by the medium Nehanda Nyakasikana capturing and executing Mazowe Native Commissioner Pollard. With the war in Matabeleland ending, Gen. Carrington was able to concentrate his forces on Mashonaland and the rebels retreated into granite kopjes. With no central command to oppose him, Carrington was able to bring Maxim guns against each stronghold in turn, until resistance ended. Just 33 of British South Africa Company medals were awarded to members of the column from Royal Dublin Fusiliers in recognition of their services in operations during the Second Matableland. One of them was as well Private Brown. William Brown was elected to come under new regulations on messing allowances under the provisions of Royal Warrant dated 31 March 1898. He received 2nd Good Conduct Badge on 18th May 1898.On the 9th February 1899 he was sent to Army Reserve. His civil life didn’t last long because he was mobilized again under special army order of 7th October 1899. On the 10th November 1899 he was once again on the way back to South Africa. He stayed in South Africa during whole Boer war until 2nd February 1902. After that he was still with the colours extra 2 years and was demobilised on the 8th February 1904, after 12 years of service. During his time in the war he took part of operations and battles in Laing’s Nek between 2 and 9 June 1900, operations during the Relief of Ladysmith between 15 December 1899 and 28 February 1900. Based on his papers William’s father lived 195 Blarney Street, Cork. Awards: - British South Africa Company Medal (Rhodes 1896 type). - Queen South Africa Medal - King South Africa Medal
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