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pjac

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Everything posted by pjac

  1. That is a superb , and possibly unique, set. The only way you would know for sure what it's worth would be to put it into a good militaria auction. If a dealer offered you £4000 it's probably worth twice that! Patrick
  2. I agree withTony on the ID. I have mounted helmet plates and buttons on card with black or red velvet type fabric stretched over the card and glued at the back ,then fitted into a frame. Small holes punched through for the loops and matchsticks or similar through the loops to secure the pieces. Cleaning is a personal decision. If you do clean, the white metal rose within the bugle horn device and the scrolls can be done with a metal polish, or Worcestershire sauce, if you want something non- abrasive. You may need to wipe the cloth, once you've cleaned the metal of the device. Do not try to remove the bugle horn device or the small scroll from the cloth at any point as it's almost certain that one or more of the bent retaining wires will break. If, as it seems from the photos,there is still gilt on the bugle horn and the rest of the plate then on no account use a metal polish to clean as it will remove the gilt. Warm soapy water and a soft brush is all I would use, although some people use diluted ammonia or lemon juice. Buttons can be done with a metal polish like Brasso. A nice set- congratulations on hanging on to the pieces. Patrick
  3. I am trying to help a member of another forum to identify a badge on a Royal Navy white uniform . It is a blue horizontal stripe high up on the left arm above the the rating badge ( Petty Officer 2nd Class) and good conduct chevrons. The uniform dates, we think, from the early 20th century. I have looked at the 1897 dress regulations but can find nothing like it. Any ideas? Thanks Patrick
  4. Grey C, Thanks for the reply, which was a very good lead. After doing some digging I've now established that it is a pre-1897 badge indicating membership of the port watch. It would be on the right sleeve for starboard watch. It is mentioned in the 1890 uniform regulations for the Royal Navy, but disappears in1897, so the uniform is obviously not 20th century. Patrick
  5. I'm not sure if this counts as a 'collection', but I have two clocks which people might be interested to see. 1. The first is an RAF sector clock, Type II made by Smith's Industries. The Astral movement is stamped with their logo and the Air Ministry mark dated 1942. Within the dial is the pencilled message in capital 'GIVE THEM HELL FROM US LADS'. The RAF insignia is clearly visible on the clock face, on which 5 minute segements are denoted by coloured triangles. This came from a reputable source and is not an ebay repro! These clocks were used in Operations Rooms. The following is a description of how they were used- acknowledgement to the author of the website at http://www.winkton.n...s/sopleyww2.htm 'An article in the July 2005 issue of Flypast magazine describes the workings of the much larger operations and plotting room at RAF Uxbridge. This was used as the 11 Group command post in the Battle of Britain and would have possessed greater functionality than was required at Sopley. None the less the information gives some clues as to how operations were conducted.From the elevated cabin a Supervisor would oversee the entire situation whilst (possibly) an Allocator would allocate fighters and intercepts to individual fighter controllers, who would then control the radar interceptions. The controllers and their assistants were situated in the elevated cabin behind the controller, and in the reporting room. There would be direct phone lines to the wider air defence organisation, manned by an assistant. On the plotting table metal arrows showing the position and direction of contacts. WAAFs used metal poles with magnetic tips to manipulate the arrows which were colour coded in co-ordination with an RAF sector clock with 5 min colour sectors to show the recency of the plot information. Plots more than ten minutes old were discarded, so only two colours of arrows would have been visible at any one time. If the station was busy, a WAAF supervisor maintained the wall mounted tote board and added additional data to the arrows such as a contact number and a classification of the contact as Hostile or Friendly. The tote board would have listed the local RAF night fighter stations, including Hurn and Middle Wallop, their night fighter squadrons with whom Sopley worked, the aircraft available and their status.' 2.The second is a ship's clock, showing the War Dept arrow at 6 o'clock. Unusually, the main units on the dial are minutes, not hours, and there is a large , highly visible second hand. So far as I have been able to find out, such clocks were used in the operations rooms of ships, and it seems likely that the dial shows the minutes rather than the hours for speed and accuracy when keeping log books etc. or for timing a 'zigzag' manooeuvre. It has a stop-watch lever at 9 o'clock on the case and this reinforces the idea of its use for very accurate time-keeping. It's also been suggested that it might have been used for gunnery purposes.The knurled knob at 3 o'clock is for adjustment. If anybody has any ideas about this clock, please let me know. I know nothing about clocks- I just like having them on the wall. All care and maintenance is done by a friendly local horologist! Patrick
  6. I don't know the answer to the question, but the place to get really good advice on restoration and maintenance is pickelhaubes.com . There is a section entitled 'restoration' and Brian Loree is the guru. He does some amazing work. Patrick
  7. Chris, It's years since I collected cap badges, and I'm quite happy to be corrected on my thoughts. My first reaction is that the back looks very shiny and clean, often the sign of a modern copy. However, the front looks to have been well polished, with highlights rubbed down, which suggests it might be genuine. How big is it? I don't recall seeing a cap badge like this, but I have seen pouch badges in this design. Final thought- it looks as though it has been cast, rather than struck from a die. This could mean that it's a poor copy. Some cast badges are genuine, and were made when a unit was stationed overseas, but I'm not sure Engineer Volunteers would have been posted abroad. Hope somebody more knowledgeable can help Patrick
  8. I'm a bit rusty on bages, and I don't have my books to hand, but the Cyclist Corps and Tyneside Irish are definitely WW1 period as, I think is the Carenarvonshire Volunteers. The Tyneside badge looks very shiny and new, and, despite the maker's mark, could well be a modern copy. Original Tyneside Irish badges are hard to find and not cheap, so if this one you've struck lucky.. The REME badge is post WW2 I think. The crown was the same for all monarchs after Victoria and before Elizabeth II. Patrick
  9. Spurred on by Coldstream and Stuart Bates , I will post photos of my collection , which is a mix of infantry officers' home service helmets and cavalry helmets. Starting with two which I bought recently, and have good photos for - taken by the seller and much better than mine will be! First is a QVC King's Royal Rifle Corps home service helmet, a type which I think was only worn by the regiment for a few years. Immaculate condition. Second is a QVC South Staffs home service helmet. Re-gilded in the 1990s and looks very good -not as shiny as the picture suggests. Body very good and liner immaculate. Trying to work out how to add photos, so forgive any glitches. Patrick
  10. Hi Stuart Exactly! Have a good Christmas. Patrick
  11. Thanks Brian Still can't believe I got this one. It was on ebay at a very reasonable starting price and I got it for that price with no competition. Don't know if everybody else was spent up before Christmas! Patrick
  12. A new arrival. This is a green cloth helmet to the Shropshire Light Infantry, pre-1891. The light infantry regiments wore green cloths rather than the blue cloths worn by other regiments.The photo doesn't really do it justice, as the green of the cloth has become more of a blue in the process of importing the photo from Photobucket. The gilt is very bright and nicely toned- difficult to capture, as natural light is awful on the shortest day of the year in Scotland, so I've had to use flash. Patrick.
  13. I found out by chance that my Great-Uncle, William Russell Stobo, Chief Engineer, and his captain F D Struss were both awarded the DSC after their ship, The Manchester Trader, engaged in a running battle with submarine U65 in the Mediterranean and was sunk off Pantellaria on 4 June 1917. This was never mentioned in the family and I have no idea what became of the medal. I would very much like to track it down. Were these medals named? Even if not named, if might still be with his named Mercantile Marine medal and BWM. Where/how would I start looking? I'm not over-optimistic about finding it, but I won't know if I don't try! Thanks Patrick
  14. Thanks all. I've checked both DNW and Spinks, but no joy. Also tried various google searches without success. What other medal auctioneers should I be looking at? Will continue with the search! Patrick
  15. I found out by chance that my Great-Uncle, William Russell Stobo, Chief Engineer, and his captain F D Struss were both awarded the DSC after their ship, The Manchester Trader, engaged in a running battle with submarine U65 in the Mediterranean and was sunk off Pantellaria on 4 June 1917. This was never mentioned in the family and I have no idea what became of the medal. I would very much like to track it down. Were these medals named? Even if not named, if might still be with his named Mercantile Marine medal and BWM. Where/how would I start looking? I'm not over-optimistic about finding it, but I won't know if I don't try! Thanks Patrick
  16. If you like these helmets (whatever they're called), there are a number for sale on CSmilitaria website. Patrick
  17. I have absolutely no Polish connections, other than the fact that I know my mother, a Red Cross nurse, looked after Polish servicemen at North Manchester Auxiliary Hospital during the war. However, this is all fascinating! I have nothing but respect for the men who were forced out of their own land and fought back so passionately. Patrick
  18. Hi Stuart I haven't been on here much recently. Good to see that you've returned to the fold. I think 'superb' more accurately describes your collection, rather than mine! Patrick
  19. Another one to add. Lothians and Berwickshire Yeomanry Cavalry. This unit existed from 1888-1902. Unfortunately a piece of the ornate decoration on the helmet plate is missing alongside the crown. I have seen similar damage on a couple of other helmets to this unit, presumably because the delicate design of a wreath of thistles makes it susceptible to this type of harm. Anyway these helmets are so few and far between that I bought it despite the problem. Patrick
  20. They are a bit different! Nice idea to collect things with a 'twist'. Patrick
  21. Despite what looks like the Royal device it doesn't look like any British helmet I have ever seen. The shape of the helmet is peculiar, the plume holder is wrong, as is the rosette for the chinchain and the badge looks like it's been cobbled together. I agree-probably a theatrical piece,or somebody trying it on. There were helmets a bit like this floating around a few years ago, with the the numeral '6' in a star, if I remember correctly. Patrick
  22. Time for an update 1.2nd Volunteer Battalion Norfolk Regiment Named inside to 'Arnold'. Not researched yet. 2. 7th Lancashire Artillery Volunteers 3. 64th (2nd South Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot The numerals were only worn on home service helmets for three years before re-organisation and the introduction of territorial titles for regiments. The helmet is named inside to Captain Dugmore 64th Regt, and came with a named tin to this officer. If anybody has the time to google Captain Dugmore 64th foot , you'll find that he doesn't appear to have been much of an officer and a gentleman! Patrick
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