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Guest Darrell

Republic of Vietnam Medals

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The originals of these, especially if made "in-country" (as these seem to be) are uncommon and desirable items.

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HI Ed - that is one thing I learned after looking at them the first time - with the Hungarian connection, I decided to take the plunge - still have six more posts...

1) Training Service Medal 1st Class (?)

2) Training Service Medal 2nd Class

3) Unkown

Edited by hunyadi

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1) Naval Service Medal

2) Staff Service Medal 2nd Class

3) Staff Service Medal 3rd Class

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1) Unknown

2) Technical Service Medal 2nd Class

3) Technical Service Medal 1st Class (?)

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Ribbons of Air Service ????

Air Service Medal - paint on center disc has flaked off

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1) Unknown

2) Armed Forces Honor Medal 2nd Class

3) Armed Forces Honor Medal 1st Class

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Hi Charles,

WOW! :speechless1: When you say "instant' collection"... you're not kidding! Fantastic! :jumping::jumping: Congratulations on yet another terrific find! :beer: Must be all those waves of good luck I've been sending your way for so long. Glad to see they're paying off! :P

Dan :cheers:

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The two unknowns in post #50 are Police Merit Medals. They came in gold, silver and bronze.

The unknowns in posts #53 and #58 are Police Honor Medals. These too came in gold, silver and bronze.

The unknown in post #56 is a People's Self Defense Medal, 2nd Class, for the People's Self Defense Force.

In post #57, the first ribbon is for an Air Gallantry Cross.

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Hello Gents,

I'm curious to find out where this breast star of the National Order was originally produced. Not good enough qualitywise to be French made and I doubt it was manufactured in South Vietnam ...

It's lightweight : 110 grammes only ! Could be a reproduction ?

Cheers,

Hendrik

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I read this thread with interest.

I do not want to sidetrack this thread but offer this anecdote that some may find of interest.

Hunyadi cites the small contingent of Hungarians.

A feature of the Paris Peace talks was the creation of the International Commission of Control and Supervision (ICCS). This organization was composed of personnel from four nations, Hungary, Poland, Canada and Indonesia. The ICCS was organized into regional teams in order to supervise the cease-fire and the return of captured personnel (partial list of responsibilities). This group worked in parallel with the Joint Military Commission (JMC) which was comprised of representatives of the Viet Cong, North Vietnamese Military, South Vietnamese Military and the US Military. Both groups had independent aviation support provided by the US complete with distinctive markings on their aircraft.

The final weeks of my tour in Vietnam were spent flying UH-1H helicopters in support of the ICCS from Tan Son Nhut, Saigon. This represented a major change for others and me. Overnight I went from Combat Cobra Pilot to flying bus driver. What didn?t change was our tendency to hang out at the officers? club bar and tell war stories. We were easily identified by our location (hanging on to the bar) and combat unit shoulder insignia. Curiously, we were instantly popular with the Hungarian and Polish members of the ICCS who freely bought drinks and listened intently to our endless war stories. They often asked questions such as ?What did you do about the SA-7 missiles?? or ?How did you avoid the (insert favorite caliber here) anti-aircraft fire??

Interestingly, one of their first buddies was not a combat pilot but a flight-suit wearing Air Force Counter-Intelligence guy. Shortly thereafter, the word was circulated to avoid the Polish and Hungarians like the plague as approximately 50% were known Soviet KGB members! Apparently there was keen interest in the AA weapons performance and countermeasures on the part of ?someone??

We of course were greatly disappointed as a wonderful audience and significant supply of alcohol became ?verboten?!

Picked this up today because of several factors. The "story" goes - and is plausable that a member of the small (about 150) delegation of Hungarian soldiers that were sent to Vientam to supervise the cease fire and to help with the demolition of mines and unexploded devices. In the program two Hungarians lost their lives. Sadly all that I know is that the member who apparently got these medals was a captain. He brought back these RVN medals as well as some US medals of Vietnam era production. As I dont know much about these medals I am posting them - all of these fall under the 'in courntry' quality of manufacture as they are all very rough in quality, not like the US manufactured ones. So here is what I call my 'instant' collection of RVN ODMs...

First off I laughed when I saw them and then found out what folks are asking for these on the net..

1) Distinguished Service Cross Navy 1st class

2) Distinguished Service Cross Army 1st class

3) Distinguished Service Cross Army 2nd class

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Here is a Medal of Honour of the Armed Forces in the collections of the National History Museum of Romania. I wonder how it got there.

mohvietnam.jpg

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Yes-- and the museum label fails to distinguish it as from the now vanished Republic of Viet Nam ("South Vietnam").

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Here are some examples from my collection.

First, some ribbon bars. The first three are Vietnamese-made; the first of which features a "67-68" clasp.

2w66kpd.jpg

2vsg1oh.jpg

Second, a display featuring the Military Merit Medal and two Cross of Gallantry:

nnutxh.jpg

Finally, my two favorites. These two RVN Campaign medals belonged to my uncle, who had served with the 18th Military Police Brigade from 1967-68:

293wt3l.jpg284684.jpg

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An interesting variant of the "60-" ribbon bar device I can't recall ever having seen before: a sew-on type on an Australian bar.

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Darrel, Here is a Vietnam made Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm in it's issue box. I bought this cross in Siagon in July 1968, So I know it is good.

Captain George Albert, Army Field Historian

Edited by army historian

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Guest Darrell

Good stuff George. Yep, that would peg it about as period as you could get :cheers:

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13. Republic of Vietnam - Nation Order Knight (5th Class) Medal.

The National Order of the Republic of Vietnam was established in the summer of 1950 when the state of Vietnam became a part of the French Union.

The Nation Order was designed to reward persons living or dead who have distinguished themselves by grandoise works, by remarkable deeds in the discharging of their duty or by their lofty vitues or their outstanding knowledge.

The National Order was also designed to reward the various organizations of the Army, the officially recognized groups, the administrative agencies actuated by a lofty sprit of sacrifice and bravery and which have carried out actions whose glamor glorifies the country. The National Order could have been awarded to foreigners for diplomatic reasons.

It came in 5 Grades:

1. Grand Cross or First Class (sash and star)

2. Grand Officer or Second Class (Star)

3. Commander or Third Class (Cravat)

4. Officerm or Fourth Class (ribbon with rosette)

5. Knight or Fifth Class (Medal and ribbon)

This is the Knight Version.

Obverse:

Hi,

Is the star mentioned in 1. and 2., the same star or are they different designs.

Thanks,

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