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Guest nelson

on the subject of The Royal Scots (first of Foot) the title comes from not only their age, but the story that Pontious Pilate was born near Perth, when his father was stationed there on the apinine wall, which is a Hadrians type defence, but crosses the country just from north of Glasgow over to the east coast.

in fact billy connolly met david bowie prior to the latter appearing as pilate in a film, and spent a considerable time trying to persuade him to play pilate with a scots accent. smile.gif

nice to know we scots are the actual cause of all of the worlds strife today!!!

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I cant think whats worse David Bowie as Pontius Pilate or him attempting a Scots accent. biggrin.gif

On the other point does that mean that Canada has no airborne troops?

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How many--if any others??-- units had their nickname AS their badge?

WW1 8th Canadian Infantry Battalion, "Winnipeg Rifles," aka

"The Black Devils."

Now THIS is a cap badge, amalgamating generic boring old bureaucrats!!!!

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Norfolk Regiment

The Holy Boys ( Not because of their piety, but because once, when they were about to leave for duty overseas, each soldier was given a bible, every one of which was sold for beer.)

Although I have heard this explanation to their nickname before, and no doubt they sold their prayer books to purchase beer!

The Norfolk Regiment [9th Foot] got this nickname from the 'Battle of Almanza' in 1707. The badge of 'Britannia' dates from this battle, where it had been awarded for gallantry. It is said to have been mistaken by the Spanish for the 'Modona'.

Other nicknames used by the regiment were 'The Fighting Ninth' and 'The Norfolk Howards'

Regards Arthur

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RCT

Rough Cut Timber as in planks or Royal Corps of Taxis.

and of course for all regt's Pongo's as every where the army goes the pong goes with them..............

Chris

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Hi Everybody

Does anybody know if there was a nickname for a regiment/regiments called "The Ferrets", I'm researchng my family Tree and have been informed one of my great uncles was a ferret!!!

Clutching at straws really... If this was a regimental nickname does anybody have any info about "The ferrets", anything at all be very helpful.

Thanks

Angel

blush.gif

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Hi Everybody

Does anybody know if there was a nickname for a regiment/regiments called "The Ferrets", I'm researchng my family Tree and have been informed one of my great uncles was a ferret!!!

Clutching at straws really... If this was a regimental nickname does anybody have any info about "The ferrets", anything at all be very helpful. 

Thanks

Angel

blush.gif

Hello Angel,

I seem to remember a lot of people having the nickname ferret when I was in the army, had nothing to do with any particular unit though. biggrin.gif

In WWII German guards would plant equipment to detect tunnelling and lie under huts eavesdropping on the prisoners or carry out raids on selected huts without warning if the men inside were thought to be up to no good. Because of their job, the allies gave them the nickname ferret.

I just wonder if the name stems from tunnelling fatigues or if British camp guards did the same in the Great War.

Tony

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Another British one to add: The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regt) - now amalgamated (several times over) into the Princess of Wales' Royal Regt. - were known as Kirke's Lambs. The Paschal Lamb was their symbol and Percy Kirke was their first Colonel. The origins of the Paschal Lamb are a bit unclear, although it was thought to be associated with Queen Catharine of Braganza for whom the regiment formed a bodyguard in the 17th C.

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Some others I've heard over the years:

REME: Ruin Everything Mechanical and Electrical

GGFG (Governor General's Foot Guards, an Ottawa-based Canadian Regiment):

Good God Forgot the Gustav. This nickname arises from an incident 10 or so years ago when the regiment was returning from exercise. One of the trucks broke down and needed to be towed so it was unloaded at the side of the road and all the kit was reloaded into another truck. All the kit, that is, except for an 84mm Carl Gustav anti-tank weapon. When the returned later it was gone and is missing to this day.

48th Highlanders of Canada: The four-dozen highlanders

QOR (Queen's Own Rifles of Canada): Queer's on Retreat (not very PC, I know)

There's more I know (or knew) but can't think of any off the top of my head right now...

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Fascinating topic, gentlemen. It is very interesting to hear all these different names! I am not aware of many American nicknames, but I will ask some of my friends in the military about them. A few I know are USMC- "Uncle Sam's Misguided Children," the US Airforce- "US Chairforce," and plenty of jokes on the Navy which lack appropriateness... Anyway,

Thanks for posting!

Capstone

Edited by The Capstone

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Hello Angel,

I seem to remember a lot of people having the nickname ferret when I was in the army, had nothing to do with any particular unit though.  biggrin.gif

In WWII German guards would plant equipment to detect tunnelling and lie under huts eavesdropping on the prisoners or carry out raids on selected huts without warning if the men inside were thought to be up to no good. Because of their job, the allies gave them the nickname ferret.

I just wonder if the name stems from tunnelling fatigues or if British camp guards did the same in the Great War.

Tony

Hi tony

have been looking on the web, see what you mean about the germans using ferrets, havn't had any luck with the same reference for the British troops, but did find a Ferret Reconnaissance vehicle, interesting stuff...will keep looking...

Angel

rolleyes.gif

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GGFG (Governor General's Foot Guards, an Ottawa-based Canadian Regiment):

Good God Forgot the Gustav. This nickname arises from an incident 10 or so years ago when the regiment was returning from exercise. One of the trucks broke down and needed to be towed so it was unloaded at the side of the road and all the kit was reloaded into another truck. All the kit, that is, except for an 84mm Carl Gustav anti-tank weapon. When the returned later it was gone and is missing to this day.

I've also heard "Gustav Gone For Good" and the "Goo-Goo Foo Goos".

Edited by Michael Johnson

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Hi Everybody

Does anybody know if there was a nickname for a regiment/regiments called "The Ferrets", I'm researchng my family Tree and have been informed one of my great uncles was a ferret!!!

Clutching at straws really... If this was a regimental nickname does anybody have any info about "The ferrets", anything at all be very helpful.

Thanks

Angel

:blush:

There was "Ferret Force" in Malaya c. 1948. It was a special counter-terrorist unit.

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Royal Artilliery - Drop shorts

Military Police (army) Monkies, the SIB - Men in Black

Royal Corps of Transport - As was, Truck F*ckers

Army Catering Corps - As was, Slop Jockeys and Bottle Washers, still were called that regardless of the '93 changes and the above of course.

Royal Pioneer Corps - Again as was, Loggies

Not a nice one this I think, but it was in refernce I think to the Sherwood Foresters - Falling plates, I'm not conversant or can remember the facts, but I think they lost a few guys in Northern Ireland on tours ???

RAMC - Rob all my comrades or scab lifters

Anyone in the stores incl. the RQMS who was the Chief blanket stacker, his bodies where blanket stackers

Territorial Army - STABS, Stupid Territortial Army Bastards and Week End Warriors, S.A.S Saturdays And Sundays and other less afectionate names.

Regualr Army - ARAB, Arrogant Regular Army Bastard.

Royal Green Jackets - I was attached to 2 RGJ back in 1999, they had names for their batts, well the two out of the three left. Fighting Farmers, was one which related I think to their recruitment locality the others I can't remember....to me they were Slack Jackets in anycase

Thats all I can remember for now.

Kr

Marcus

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The 50th of Foot (West Kents?) were known as the Dirty Half Hundred due to the black facings on their tunics

And an infantry reg't were "The Steelbacks" 'cause they were flogged so often; The 1st Foot (Royal Scots) were "pontius Pilates Bodyguard - did I say this? - 'cause they were so old. The Connaught Rangers - "The Devil's Own" for their fighting prowess on and off the battlefield.

Don't have the books in front of me, but 18th & 19th C Br regiments ALL had nciknames, if only the old "colonel's title" "Barrell's Blues", for eg. (fought at Culloden, don't recall which "Foot")

Kipling referes to a unit as "THe Holy Christians" as they'd been on home service so long - a dig at the Guards, I think.

Peter

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Hello Gents,

Several years ago I published some studies about the fightings in South West-Flanders, October 1918.

The 1st Bn. Newfoundland Rgt. fought their last battle (and got a Caribou monument in Harelbeke)in WWI. During the search for info, someone told me their nickname ( i'm wondering if the last word will show tiny stars?) : the five bob ######s. I was told the Newfie's were paid five bob ( five shilling's??) a day , more than a British soldier. Is there anyone who know's the pay of a British soldier during WWI?

Was wondereing if someone could confirm this, or can throw a light on this.

With kind regards,

Jef

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