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Here are a couple of Australian example. On the combat uniform a cloth wound stripe would be worn generally which prevented snagging on equipment etc.

If the recipient had served in the Great War and was wounded and then returned to serve in WW2, then the stripe, or stripes, were red, any additional wound would be in gold. The black and white photo is the cloth type (in case you couldn't tell).

Regards;

Johnsy

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Here are a couple of Australian example. On the combat uniform a cloth wound stripe would be worn generally which prevented snagging on equipment etc.

If the recipient had served in the Great War and was wounded and then returned to serve in WW2, then the stripe, or stripes, were red, any additional wound would be in gold. The black and white photo is the cloth type (in case you couldn't tell).

Regards;

Johnsy

Never knew Diggers had a slightly different type, is there a patent number on the undeneath of the stripe itself?

I've noticed the stripes on many WWI photos of Brit soldiers appear to be of a different type of cloth stripe as seen in any of the above posts. If I can take a half decent photo of what I mean, I'll add it.

Tony

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Hello fellows,

I recall my father,he was a WAG in a bomber, telling me that during WW II the Royal Canadian Air Force wound stripe amounted to a simple gold thread worn on the lower left sleeve. At the time I imagined this as a very narrow actual "thread". I've never seen one other than the WW I wound stripes in cloth and metal. Anyone know of this "thread" my father spoke of?

Cheers

Brian

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Hello fellows,

I recall my father,he was a WAG in a bomber, telling me that during WW II the Royal Canadian Air Force wound stripe amounted to a simple gold thread worn on the lower left sleeve. At the time I imagined this as a very narrow actual "thread". I've never seen one other than the WW I wound stripes in cloth and metal. Anyone know of this "thread" my father spoke of?

Cheers

Brian

Brian,

I'd imagine it would be as in the Great War or maybe as in the post above (No. 21) but am only guessing.

Here are 2 scans, showing a kind of cloth stripe I've never seen and one arm (on the right) with what appears to be the standard brass type.

Tony

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The second scan

Hi Tony,

I think you are probably correct. When I think back I believe we were discussing medals etc. and he was making reference to the US Purple Heart and compairing it to what the British and Canadians received for a wound. This is probably why he used the term " a thin gold thread". I've never seen one from the Second World War and he may have been wrong about the Wound Stripe being awarded in WW II. I've seen lots of photos of WW I soldiers wearing them but none from WW II.

Cheers

Brian

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Never knew Diggers had a slightly different type, is there a patent number on the undeneath of the stripe itself?

I've noticed the stripes on many WWI photos of Brit soldiers appear to be of a different type of cloth stripe as seen in any of the above posts. If I can take a half decent photo of what I mean, I'll add it.

Tony

I'm not sure as I don't have this stripe, though it does appear to be a commercially made type

Regards;

Johnsy

Edited by Tiger-pie

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Nicely done article of the Candian Forces Wound Stripe. I am with the RCMP and am trying, since 2000, to get a similar badge implemented with the Force. Of course there will be modifications to the cirteria for qualification. The Force can implement a band or ident badge but they seem to be stuck on the idea that this wound stripe is too much for our uniform. Typical of the BS that the higher ups shovel. Everyone else, that works in the field, seems to think that it is. I have never been wounded and hope to get though my career unscathed. I will still persue this idea for as long as I am in.

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