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Private Starkey DCM

One of the first Australian soldiers to be decorated in war and was later selected to attend the coronation of King Edward VII in 1901.

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Thomas Anderson 2/29th Battalion, aged 17, posted missing Febuary 1942, Malaya.

A larrikin, often absent without leave, he was regarded as a good soldier. His fate was unknown. My great-uncle Aubrey Rickard fought in this unit, and I wonder if they knew each other. Aubrey was killed in Bukit Temuh Road on the 11th of Febuary a few days before the surrender of Singapore.

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Albert Roberts MC. Was a Major with M Special Unit who operated in Japanese occupied New Britain. Dropped from an American submarine in September 1943 Roberts organised an itelligence network among the local population. Robert's guerillas rescued four American airmen who had been shot down.

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Private W. Learoyd of the ambulance corps of the NSW Sudan contingent appears to be the first Aussie soldier to become a battle casualty when he and two other men where wounded near Tamai shortly after their arrival in Suakin. He later served in the South African war.

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Sir Ross Macpherson Smith was Australia's most highly decorated airman during WW1. Initially he served in the Light Horse before transferring to the Australian Flying Corps.

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VC biscuit brown. :lol: Sorry about the quality of the photos, but this was displayed about a foot or so above my head height. It has "VC URIE 1915" written on it.

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G for George. This was a Lancaster that was crewed predominately by Aussies. The hall it is in has low lighting so some of these photo are dark, the fact that it is matt black didn't help.

Edited by Tiger-pie

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LT. GEN. Sir Leslie Morshead was the commander of the 9th Division AIF, attached to the Eighth Army in North Africa. The 9th was to play a key role in the first and second battles of El Alamein in late 1942.

Due to the rapid nature of advances and retreats it was necessary for a commander to be able to keep up with the action. This truck was converted to a caravan to allow Morshead the flexibility of movement. Transport was exceedingly important to all ranks, and without it an army in the desert is virtually useless. The much maligned Italian army was a victim of this and thus surrendered in droves, had they been better equiped then the campaign would have been much harder on the Allies.

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Oto Breda 20mm cannon captured by the 9th in North Africa. This campaign was probably the only one where captured enemy equipment from uniforms to weapons were utilized on a regular basis by both sides on an immediate basis. For example the Germans found the wool trousers used by the Brits and Commonwealth troops superior to their cotton issue and captured stock was highly prized. The Allies were much impressed with mortars, anti-tank guns and artillery that the Germans were equipped with and often used these against their former owners. Both sides used all manner of captured vehicles.

Edited by Tiger-pie

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Johnsy,

I've been waiting to say"WOW!!! WELL DONE!!! :jumping: Fantastic photos and history!!! :jumping: Many Thanks for sharing this museum and medals :D

:beer: Doc

Your welcome, just imagine how good these pictures would be if I had a decent camera !! I have shamelessly promoted the AWM on many military forums for the benefit of not only my own countrymen who can't get to Canberra to see it, but also those overseas militaria collectors that may never get to visit. There is more to come.

Regards;

Johnsy

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