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I only started collecting again a couple of years ago by chance, when I found a copy of von Salomon's Freikorps book at a book fair, which peaked my interest again.

Its great to see someone get back into the hobby, to many leave it :-(

Best

Chris

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Its great to see someone get back into the hobby, to many leave it :-(

Best

Chris

It's funny. I stopped collecting Imperial orders and decorations by 1995 because at that point, I had most orders up to commander grade, so had entered the rarified world of grand cross sets, which were expensive and beginning to be reproduced quite well by the mid-90s. I was afraid that the reproductions would eventually kill the hobby and the value of my collection.

When I look at the repros now, those in the 90s pale significantly. Yet, people are still collecting and the values have sky-rocketed. For example, who knew Turkish War Medals would shoot up to hundreds of dollars? 17 years ago, you could still get a Godet for well under $100 and nobody even wanted the Turkish issue ones, which could be had for $5-10.

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I've been talking a lot, so thought I should post an interesting and rare Freikorps badge.

Freiwilligen-Eskadron von Lützow/Freiwilligen-Eskadron Kürassier-Regiment 7 Sleeve Badge

The uninterrupted history of the regiment stretches back to 1815 all the way through WWI, the Freikorps period and into the Reichswehr.

DAS KÜRASSIER-REGIMENT VON SEYDLITZ (MAGDEBURGISHES) NR. 7

Founded 1815

Fought in the Wars of Unification from 1862-1866

FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR, 1870-71

General von Bredow’s “Death Ride” at the Battle of Mars La Tour, 1870 in which 7th Cuirassiers, 19th Dragoons and 16th Uhlans charged and overran the French guns

A detachment of NCOs and enlisted men fought in Southwest Africa in 1904/05

WORLD WAR I

Began on the Western Front then moved to Poland in Late 1914

Kurland and Lithuania in 1915-16

Rumania in 1917

Western Front in late 1917

Siegfried line September - October 1918

last battles in Flanders 1918

Returned to their barracks in Halberstadt in Novermber and demobilized in December 1918

FREIKORPS

Remnants formed Freiwilligen-Eskadron von Lützow/Freiwilligen-Eskadron Kürassier-Regiment 7 in January 1919 and served in the Baltic campaign

REICHSWEHR

Formed a “Traditions-Eskadron” as part of the Vörlaufiges Reichswehr in November 1919

Together with 4 other cavalry squadrons formed Reichswehr Reiter-Regiment 10 in March 1920

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Hi,

a long history indeed! Was this worn just in the Freikorps period?

As far as I know, it was only worn while they served in the Freikorps. Although, given the incomplete records, maybe a photo will show up one of these days with the badge being worn as a Reichswehr "Tradition Badge" since they did form a "Tradition Eskadron" in the Preliminary Reichswehr. It's a logical assumption. There were only about 180 men and 10 officers in the Freikorps unit. So, as far as I know they didn't really operate independently, but as a mounted unit in the Iron Division. They left before the Iron Division became the Deutsche Legion and joined The Russian Westarmee. It was always a small unit and therefore this is quite a scarce badge.

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As far as I know, it was only worn while they served in the Freikorps

Well I was wrong. I've found out more info and this badge was worn as a tradition badge, likely up until 1935.

.

I just picked up another arm badge of the Freiwilligen-Eskadron von Lützow/Freiwilligen-Eskadron Kürassier-Regiment 7, which was worn as a Tradition Badge by Gefreiter Hermann Gollus of the 10. (Preuss.) Reiter-Regiment 1. Eskadron c. 1929.

The badge differs from the first version I showed above, in that it is one-piece instead of having the shield separately attached to the backplate with flat pins. However, I suspect that this pattern badge may have been a 2nd strike used first by the Freikorps, when they discovered weaknesses in the multi-piece badge, which was thinner and prone to stress-cracks which likely caused the pins to break easily (mine has a repaired stress crack and only 2 of the 4 original pins).

This one-piece badge then became the tradition badge of the Freiwilligen-Eskadron Kürassier-Regiment 7 when it formed a tradition squadron in the preliminary Reichswehr in November 1919.

As shown in the photo of Gollus, from his 1929 Sports Badge document, the badge continued to be worn as a tradition badge when Freiwilligen-Eskadron Kürassier-Regiment 7 became 1. Eskadron, 10. (Preuss.) Reiter Regt.

Gollus was only 15 when the Freikorps was first formed in January 1919. But, given that many teenagers served in Freikorps units, it's possible that he joined the Freikorps at some point before March 1920 when they became part of 10. Reiter Regt. The reason I think this is because he otherwise would not have been eligible to wear the tradition badge.

Here is an interesting group picture of 1. Eskadron 10. Reiter Regt. showing the arm badge being worn by Gollus and few other Freikorps vets. Gollus is sitting in the front row, 2nd from the right. Unfortunately I didn't get this picture. But, I did manage to get a copy of it, which I'll post here.

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_07_2013/post-12700-0-91827400-1374770685.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_07_2013/post-12700-0-72110700-1374770766.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_07_2013/post-12700-0-74128000-1374770802.jpg

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From the book "Horst Wessel - Sein Lebensweg, nach Lichtbildern...."herausgegeben von seiner Schwester Ingeborg; Verlag Franz Eher Nachf. 1933.

page 47

[Horst Wessel] Beim Bunde Wiking des Kapitäns Ehrhardt, auf den damals die völkische Jugend schwor.

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From the book "Horst Wessel - Sein Lebensweg, nach Lichtbildern...."herausgegeben von seiner Schwester Ingeborg; Verlag Franz Eher Nachf. 1933.

page 52

Aus wars mit dem Wiking - aber Horst kapitulierte nicht

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The photo above illustrates the wrong collar badges for Brigade Ehrhardt. Those are the Garde Kavallerie Schutzen Division collars.
Brigade Ehrhardt and the Wikingbund wore the same style, but without the G.K.S.D. letters above the helmet. Also, the GKSD collar had 2 splints for attaching, while the Brigade Ehrhardt collar had holes drilled through for sewing on.

Here is what a correct set should look like.

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I have seen but few mentions of the Freikorps organization, Hanauer Burgerwehr.  Does a photo exist of this insignia in wear and can others comment on the authenticity of insignia in the marketplace?

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I have seen but few mentions of the Freikorps organization, Hanauer Burgerwehr.  Does a photo exist of this insignia in wear and can others comment on the authenticity of insignia in the marketplace?

I have never seen either the lapel pin or arm-badge in a photo. The lapel pins are fairly common and the ones I've seen over the last 30 years or so, all have the same construction. So, I assume they're real. I haven't heard of this particular badge being faked. The arm-badges, on the other hand are extremely rare.

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Few of my collection some of which matched with von Salomon's Freikorps book

freikorps4 004.JPG

freikorps4 001.JPG

freikorps4 002.JPG

freikorps4 003.JPG

freikorps4 010.JPG

freikorps4 005.JPG

freikorps4 006.JPG

freikorps4 008.JPG

freikorps4 009.JPG

2

freikorps4 022.JPG

freikorps4 017.JPG

freikorps4 018.JPG

freikorps4 019.JPG

freikorps4 020.JPG

3

freikorps4 015.JPG

freikorps4 016.JPG

freikorps4 012.JPG

freikorps4 026.JPG

freikorps4 029.JPG

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I believe the Bug Stern is a fake. Can you show the reverse? I also believe the skull in photo #6 is a fake. The Hubertus Stag-head badge is not Freikorps, but Imperial Jäger Kaiser prize.

Also, those are not Freiwilligen Landesjägerkorps collar badges which were silver not gold.They are Freikorps Hülsen.

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Hello bolewts58,

The Hubertus stag head is not a Jäger Kaiserabzeichen. They had the year of the award on the skull. They were also on a green backing wool (though this is easily changed). This one, I suggest, is a postwar version, worn variously by hunting associations, etc.

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Hello bolewts58,

The Hubertus stag head is not a Jäger Kaiserabzeichen. They had the year of the award on the skull. They were also on a green backing wool (though this is easily changed). This one, I suggest, is a postwar version, worn variously by hunting associations, etc.

That makes more sense. Unfortunately, given the less than perfect database available on Freikorps material, it allows for dealers to make all kinds of spurious claims. So, in the case of this badge, it is often referred to as the Hubertus badge of Freikorps Rossbach, when no such badge ever existed. FK Rossbach used the staghead without crown only, as did several other Freikorps. None used it with a crown.

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Many folks agree the skull in photo 6 is an original from the so called Berlin Hoard.  

I have a couple since they are cheap enough to get, but I'm not sure of authenticity since no documentation on the find itself has surfaced. 

My Bug Stern to compare with: 

 

IMG_8632.JPG

IMG_8633.JPG

Edited by mchapman

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