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Service Record

Name TAYLOR, VICTOR JAMES

Service Australian Army

Service Number NX16370

Date of Birth 12 Feb 1920

Place of Birth SYDNEY, NSW

Date of Enlistment 22 May 1940

Locality on Enlistment REDFERN, NSW

Place of Enlistment PADDINGTON, NSW

Next of Kin TAYLOR, GEORGE

Date of Discharge 3 Dec 1945

Rank Corporal

Posting at Discharge 2/4 Field Company

WW2 Honours and Gallantry None for display

Prisoner of War No

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Guest Darrell

Interesting, I have a Africa / Pacific Star medal group as well. Many were sceptical of whether it could be a possible combination. Do you have any supporting docs? :jumping:

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Hallo Tiger-pie :cheers:

Can you tell what his connection to the Polish Forces was

to merit a Polish Commemorative Cross with TOBRUCK Bar??

And if possible can you post a close up of the front of the Polish award

Medal ring??

Many thanks Kevin in Deva. :cheers:

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Many were sceptical of whether it could be a possible combination.

Well they obviously have no bloody idea about Australian military history. The 7th Division, known as the "Silent Seventh" fought in practically every major battle the Australian army was involved in.

Battle honours

North Africa

Giarabub

Defence of Tobruk

The Salient 1941

South-West Pacific 1942-1945

Buna-Gona

Sanananda Road

Cape Endaiadere-Sinemi Creek

Sanananda-Cape Killerton

Milne Bay

Liberation of Australian New Guinea

Shaggy Ridge

Finisterres

Borneo 1945

Balikpapan

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It has to be one of the few land units that could have worn both, though. A hard combination if you don't float or fly (and not so simple for them).

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It has to be one of the few land units that could have worn both, though. A hard combination if you don't float or fly (and not so simple for them).

II Corp, made up of the 6th, 7th and 9th Divisions fought in North Africa and were recalled to Australia to fight in the Pacific in 1942. The only ones who didn't get the Africa Star and Pacific Star combination were the ones they left behind in the deserts of Egypt and Libya, and the 'new chums" that joined the battalions when these Divisions refitted back in Australia.

Regards;

Johnsy

Edited by Tiger-pie

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My Great-Uncle, Lt. Alexander Cunningham STARMER has nearly an identical group. He went over to Africa as a Corporal with the 2/15th Infantry Battalion (9th Division) and was a Sergeant during the siege of Tobruk and an A/WOII at El Alamein. Shortly before the 2/15th returned to Australia to train for New Guinea he was commissioned and won the MC near Finschafen, New Guinea in September of 1943. His medal group comprises the following:

Military Cross, 1939/45 Star, Africa Star with 8th Army Clasp, Pacific Star, Defence Medal, War Medal, Australian Service Medal

Citation for his Military Cross, from the London Gazette of 2 March 1944:

On 27 Sep 43, when two companies of his battalion attacked strongly held enemy positions on a commanding feature west of FINSCHAFEN, Lieut STARMER displayed leadership and dash of a high order.

At least a company of Japanese marines were sited in well dug in positions commanding a clear field of fire over low kunai grass to the edge of the feature. As STARMER's platoon moved up to the top of the hill, after an exhausting advance over rugged mountainous country, the enemy opened fire from LMG's, rifles, and 13mm guns.

Rapidly organising his platoon after their arduous climb, STARMER overran the posts at the edge of the clearing, then, rallying his tired men, led them with great dash across the open ground in the face of enemy fire from posts about 50 yards away. The speed and resolution of the attack were such that the enemy resistance was broken and a number of the enemy fled in panic. In this attack STARMER's platoon killed at least twenty of the enemy.

The enemy position was a strong one and it is considered that many casualties would have been incurred in taking it had it not been for the vigorous leadership and promptness to seize the initiative that Lieut STARMER displayed.

The action of his platoon was the main factor in gaining this important ground, the capture of which was vital to further operations against FINSCHAFEN.

Unfortunately I don't have a photo of the group yet but it is still with his daughter in Queensland. Here's a photo of him shortly after the war:

Edited by Geoff Reeves

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Hallo Tiger-pie :cheers:

Can you tell what his connection to the Polish Forces was

to merit a Polish Commemorative Cross with TOBRUCK Bar??

And if possible can you post a close up of the front of the Polish award

Medal ring??

Many thanks Kevin in Deva. :cheers:

The Polish medal is an official and was established on the 17-5-1989 and issued to Rats of Tobruk who came under command of General Stanislaw Kopanski. This included Australians. I wouldn't say that it is a rare group, but scarce would be a fair call. Most Australian units had been recalled back to Australia to fight the Japs, and the Poles and various British units relieved them. Some specialists stayed on, but I can't really say for how long or what the time frame for the awarding of the medal was. Once I get this blokes Service Record I will be able to supply you with more info. Will post some closeups later, just waiting for my batteries to charge for my camera.

Regards;

Johnsy

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Interesting, I have a Africa / Pacific Star medal group as well. Many were sceptical of whether it could be a possible combination. Do you have any supporting docs? :jumping:

Other than the info from the Nominal Roll, no. Given that I am well versed in Australian military I wouldn't even think to question this combination, though many would not have survived to receive both. An example would be the 2/12 Batt. (18th Brigade 7th Division). After the "Battle of the Beaches" their commander asked all those who had served from Tobruk onwards to step forward, there were 29 of them in all, and some of those had been wounded and returned to the unit more than once.

Perhaps this group is less common than I may have first thought.

Regards;

Johnsy

http://www.ww2roll.gov.au/

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For Kev, close up of Polish medal. If you need any more let me know.

Regards;

Johnsy

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