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leigh kitchen

"South African War Through The Stereoscope".

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Produced by "Underwood & Underwood, Publishers, of New York, London, Toronto-Canada, Ottawa-Kansas." "Works and Studios Arlington NJ, Littleton NH, Washngton DC".

Copyright 1900.

Captions appear on the front of the cards in English, & on the revereses in 6 languages.

Edited by leigh kitchen

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The Last Drop - a scene on the Battlefield at Dordrecht, South Africa, Dec. 30th.

Compare to "The Dyng Bugler" in this thread:

http://gmic.co.uk/index.php?showtopic=14398

Supposedly different battlefields, but are they?

The dying, Bugler, the last stand, the last bullet, the last drop (of water), the last drop (of blood)..............

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New Zealand Hill defenders and distant hills held by the Worcesters (Jan. 25th), Slingersfontein.

From the web site "Worcestershire Regiment",

http://www.worcestershireregiment.com/wr.p...inc/h_boer_war:

2nd Battalion

On the 17th December 1899 the men of the 2nd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment embarked at Southampton on the troop ship 'Tintagel Vastle' and headed for the war in South Africa as reinforcements for the British Army under Field Marshal Lord Roberts. On the 8th January 1900 the 2nd Battalion disembarked at Cape Town and then made their way north towards the town of Rensburg where Lieut.-General Clements was holding back the Boers who were now concentrated at Colesberg some 10 miles north of the British line.

The 2nd Battalion Worcesters now joined General Clements Brigade together with the 1st Royal Irish and the 2nd Battalion Wiltshires. The British line still laid in a semicircle extending from Slingersfontein upon the right to Kloof Camp upon the left, and the general scheme of operations continued to be an enveloping movement upon the right. General Clements commanded this section of the forces on the right. The British lines had gradually stretched until they were now nearly fifty miles in length.

On the 12th February 1900, the right flank of the British at Slingersfontein came under a strong attacked by the Boers commanded by General De la Rey's. The key of the British position at this point was a kopje held by three companies of the 2nd Worcester Regiment. Upon this the Boers made a fierce onslaught, but were as fiercely repelled. They came up in the dark between the set of moon and rise of sun, as they had done at the great assault of Ladysmith, and the first dim light saw them in the advanced sangars. The Boer generals do not favour night attacks, but they are exceedingly fond of using darkness for taking up a good position and pushing onwards as soon as it is possible to see. This is what they did upon this occasion, and the first intimation which the outposts had of their presence was the rush of feet and loom of figures in the cold misty light of dawn.

Lieut-General Clements

The occupants of the sangars were killed to a man, and the assailants rushed onwards. As the sun topped the line of the veldt half the kopje was in their possession. Shouting and firing, they pressed onwards.

But the Worcester men were steady old soldiers, and the battalion contained no less than four hundred and fifty marksmen in its ranks. Of these the companies upon the hill (later named Worcester Hill) had their due proportion, and their fire was so accurate that the Boers found themselves unable to advance any further. Through the long day a desperate duel was maintained between the two lines of riflemen.

The Worcestershire Commander Lieut.- Colonel Charles Cuningham and his second in command Brevet- Major Arthur Kennedy Stubbs were killed while endeavouring to recover the ground which had been lost. Hovel and Bartholomew continued to encourage their men, and the British fire became so deadly that that of the Boers was dominated. Under the direction of Hacket Pain, who commanded the nearest post, guns of J battery were brought out into the open and shelled the portion of the kopje which was held by the Boers. The latter were reinforced, but could make no advance against the accurate rifle fire with which they were met. The Bisley champion of the battalion, with a bullet through his thigh, expended a hundred rounds before sinking from loss of blood. It was an excellent defence, and a pleasing exception to those too frequent cases where an isolated force has lost heart in face of a numerous and persistent foe.

Edited by leigh kitchen

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Looking over the 12th Brigade Camp and Signal Hill, Slingersfontein, British Campaign, S.A.

This photograph is shown & an action on 16th January 1900 at Sligersfontein mentioned here -

"On 16 January 1900 the Lancers suffered their first casualties of the war in an ambush while reconnoitring Boer positions near Slingersfontein. Only six men managed to flee to safety, two were killed and the remainder captured."

<a href="http://www.awm.gov.au/wartime/8/articles/origins_boer.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.awm.gov.au/wartime/8/articles/origins_boer.pdf</a>

Another interesting item concerning the same action:

"George Allman Griffen, who was the first man to volunteer for the Light Horse was the first of the NSW Contingent to die in South Africa on 16 January 1900 during a Boer ambush at Slingersfontein His death had such an impact in Australia at a time when the coutry was celebrating its new found Federation, a committee of his friends and supporters commissioned Achille Simonetti to create a marble tablet in his memory. Simonetti was the most fashionable sculptor in Sydney at the time, having modelled busts and statues of many Sydney luminaries. Simonetti, who died before the tablet was completed, arranged for sculptor James White, the first sculptor to win Sydney's prestigious Wynne Prize to complete the work. The tablet, inscribed incorrectly to George Griffin, was erected in the Vestibule in Sydney Town Hall where it can be seen today."

The article contains a photograph of a memorial to this man.

http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/history...m/lg_88277.html

Edited by leigh kitchen

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And another article describing the action & death of another Australian:

Fred Kilpatrick was a schoolteacher. He taught at Leichhardt Public School and at Carlingford.

He was also a Lancer. He took part in the great adventure to train in England, then serve in South Africa. He became the first Lancer to die in action. According to the official report on Kilpatrick?s death, written by Major (later Major General) Lee (OC Lancer Squadron South Africa), the action was as follows:

"Slingersfontein, 17-1-1900.- In reference to the patrol of New South Wales and First Australian Horse that left camp at 3 a.m. yesterday under Lieutenant W.V. Dowling, of the First Australian Horse, the following is notified for record: The patrol after leaving camp was attended by Major Lee as far as Pleese's farm. After short halt Lieutenant Dowling moved on with patrol. At 3.30 p.m. Warrant Officer Duncan reported his return to camp, also that he had been with Lieutenant Dowling's patrol up till 1 p.m. The patrol had reconnoitred according to instructions, and was about returning to camp when Warrant Officer Duncan with two men, was detached to examine Mr. Foster's farm. After doing so, he went in search of Lieutenants Dowling's part, and failing to find them concluded they had returned to camp. At 4.30 p.m. Major Lee received a message from Colonel Porter to see him at once in reference to the patrol, and rode around immediately with Warrant Officer Duncan and Private Buchholtz, and was informed that a New South Wales Lancer patrol had been cut up. Colonel Porter proceeded to the top of the adjacent hill, where Warrant Office Duncan and Private Buchholtz explained all particulars. The Colonel considered the unfortunate occurrence could not be classed otherwise than as an accident, and that no one was to blame. It was decided after hearing the verbal evidence of the Rimington Scouts (Bennet and two others) that we would wait developments and see if any came in after dark. At 11.30 p.m,. Private Artlett, Parramatta Half-squadron, returned to camp in an exhausted condition. The position of the occurrence was located by the Lancer scouts, some distance away on our left front. Upon examination it was found the T.S.M. Griffin, No. 367, First Australian Horse, had been killed from bullet wounds, one being through the head. Corporal F. Kilpatrick, No. 755, New South Wales Lancers, was found severely wounded - one bullet wound through the lungs, and the lower jaw smashed as if by an explosive bullet. Owing to the Boers appearing on our left flank in strength I withdrew all combatants from the front, and sent on the ambulance. On return the medical officer reported that he had buried T.S.M. Griffin on the spot where he had fallen, and that Corporal Kilpatrick was in the ambulance expiring. Corporal Kilpatrick died, at 5.10 p.m. was buried next to the two New Zealanders on the slope above Slingersfontein Farm.?

There are memorials to Corporal Kilpatrick at Carlingford and Leichhardt schools.

http://www.bwm.org.au/site/Fred_Kilpatrick.asp

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Fantastic images Leigh, love the first one, I have a pair of medals to 4837 Pte J.Ord the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders, IGSM Punjab & Tirah, QSA Pa, Drei, Jo, Belf & CC, wonder if the guy was in this picture? a cracking thread :D

:beer:

Best regards

Geoff

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Ta, these things really are great when vewed through a stereoscope. The 'scope that I have, like so many others, has the sliding fitting for the card missing, so you have to hold the card in front of the viewer or make a substitute.

I have seen the table top type ex - services model for air photo reading & recognition (which would do for stereo viewing these cards as well) for sale in the past, I don't know whether they're still in use, they are such a basic, simple piece of kit that somebody's no doubt found reason to replace them with something that looks a bit more modern even if they have'nt been supersceeded by more modern technology.

We're so used to thinking of refugees in terms of the haunted / hunted souls of WWII & more recent conflicts that it seems strange to see the refugees from Ladysmith as if on a Sunday outing, but who knows what fear & hardship is hidden by the costumes of the people shown?

Here are some more photos, I'll cut down on the waffle as what I post on thread is going to be readily available on line.

"When the Cannon's roar is still" - sleeping by their Arms (Dec. 30th) before Colesberg, South Africa

Edited by leigh kitchen

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The English Drummer Boy's Letter - Writing home to Mother after the Vctory at Colesberg, South Africa.

Hi Leigh, just thought I'd put a query in here, 'The English Drummer Boys Letter - Writing home to Mother after the Vctory at Colesberg', strange title to the slide, as I believe the British Army never tooks "Boy's" on active service again after Isandhlwana...I must admit the guy with the drum looks very young ;).

Your slides are great, lovely collection.

:beer:

Best regards

Geoff.

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You've got me on this one, I don't know when the British stopped taking what we think of as child "Drummer Boys", into action, but I think they were still taken on campaigns & expeditions past the turn of the 19th Ccentury.

There's a fairly interesting South African Military History Societyarticle on a young drummer killed at Magersfontein here

<a href="http://rapidttp.com/milhist/vol046fb.html" target="_blank">http://rapidttp.com/milhist/vol046fb.html</a>

"The term "drummer boy" is of course a romantic nonsense phrase: some were very young as it happens, because in the old days drummers were the youngest stage a youth could join the active Army. On the other hand "band boy" is an official term as they were often very young indeed, before the days of apprentice schemes. They were in fact called "boy so and so" and did not go to war, but drummers were never as young as all that, unless you go right back to the days in the 18th century when even officers were commissioned while mere school boys'."

Drummer Boys feature here, c1880 in a Kipling tale.

http://www.kipling.org.uk/rg_foreandaft1.htm

Also from that site: "[Page 332, line 22] drummer-boys Band-boys were enrolled for ?boy service? at about twelve years old and went to school as described in Chapter 6 of Kim, coming under the Drum Major for discipline. They transferred to men?s service at eighteen when their time began to count for pension ORG believes Lew and Jakin may have been taken from Orme?s History Of Three Indian Wars."

I have a small Victorian fictional & very maudlin book on the death of a Drummer Boy who served in Egypt c1882 I think, I'll dig it out.

Can anybody seperate fact from fiction when it comes to Drummer Boys?

Sounds like a subject for a thread of its own,

Edited by leigh kitchen

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Looking over the 12th Brigade Camp and Signal Hill, Slingersfontein, British Campaign, S.A.

This photograph is shown & an action on 16th January 1900 at Sligersfontein mentioned here -

Here's the image in 3-D anaglyph, you can see the stereo-effect with red/blue or red /green glasses.

Red for the left eye.

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