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Hi Dave,

This one seems to be made of a hard plastic-like material, perhaps Bakelite?. I'll probably take the whole assembly off as it is held on with three screws and try WD40 on it. Also I wouldn't want to get WD on the face or dials of the radio.

WD40 and duct tape should be on our nation's flag! :lol:

I pity any society were there is no WD40 and duct tape.

I have some parts to find in order to restore the radio. I'm missing one of the antennas, one microphone is missing and a couple of cables coverings have gone gooey over the years. I may not be able to restore it to working condition but at least it will look complete.

I've included a photo of the watch mount and I'm sure it must be the type that is threaded. I didn't want to use too much pressure on attempting to unscrew it for fear it might crack.

I may have a source for the grill and the canvas cover that protected the radio in use. There is a fellow who bought a lot of military surplus in the 1960s and he lives about 20 miles from me. I can hardly wait to check out his stock.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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Right, Brian. Bakelite tends to get brittle with age so don't force anything. The red and blue screws by the way were for pre-set frequencies. You netted in on one, say red, tightened up the 2 red screws then did the same on another freq with the blue ones. There is a slot on each one in which a penny fit to tighten them. Frequencies were pre-assigned each day and if difficulties were encountered on one you just flipped the dial and it would lock on the other. Today you can switch to 1000 different ones with the push of a button.

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It took a while but I finally added the missing watch to the radio. It is a display item only and is not in working condition though I have been told by a local watch repairman that it could be set right again. It came with the chain ring but I took it off to fit in the radio. These are made of a spring-like sttel and can be "popped" on and off easily. The watch is Swiss made by Moeris.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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These watches are all marked on the back with the British Government broad arrow, or with the "C" and arrow point of the Canadian Government. This one is British. It is marked G.S.T.P which stands for General Service Time Piece, though I have read that there are other translations of these initials. It is numbered, 140075, but it is badly worn.

These watches are not uncommon but it took me a while to find one in my price range. I keep saying that I collect medals all the while purchasing everything else! Anyway I am happy to be adding this to my ever evolving WS No. 19 Mk 2 radio.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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This is a communications station display set up at the CMHM in Brantford Ontario as mentioned in the last post. There are several other pieces of equipment shown along with the WS 19 but you can see the WS 19 set up quite well. I would like to have mine displayed in a similar manner (without the manniquin) once I have it complete. I am missing the protective grill (see the photo before this one) and an aerial guard/mount. I have all of the three head sets and one signals satchel (need two more) and then I can start on the display.

Cheers :cheers: and thanks for looking at my post.

I can see that since I am the only one who has posted one of these that the interest is low on the forum for communications but where would be be without it.

Brian signing off. :lol:

P.S. By the way the museum does not have the watch mounted in the radio only because things tend the "sprout legs" and "walk" out the door unless behind glass or locked away in the vault-room. A sad reflection on today's society.

Edited by Brian Wolfe

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Guest IMHF

This is a communications station display set up at the CMHM in Brantford Ontario as mentioned in the last post. There are several other pieces of equipment shown along with the WS 19 but you can see the WS 19 set up quite well. I would like to have mine displayed in a similar manner (without the manniquin) once I have it complete. I am missing the protective grill (see the photo before this one) and an aerial guard/mount. I have all of the three head sets and one signals satchel (need two more) and then I can start on the display.

Cheers :cheers: and thanks for looking at my post.

I can see that since I am the only one who has posted one of these that the interest is low on the forum for communications but where would be be without it.

Brian signing off. :lol:

P.S. By the way the museum does not have the watch mounted in the radio only because things tend the "sprout legs" and "walk" out the door unless behind glass or locked away in the vault-room. A sad reflection on today's society.

This is a very beautiful display :cheers: I like all the extras around the radio: looks like the disply is conducting real operations as in a battlefield CP.

Thank you for sharing:

Lorenzo

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Hello Everyone,

It took a while but I've added the Spare Valves Case to my wireless set and have just gotten around to posting the photos. There have been several of these offered since I've started my search but I wanted one that was complete and of about the came age and condition of the rest of the radio and equipment. This one fit the bill and also didn't cause financial hardship.

As I said the case is complete with all of the valves (radio tubes) as well as the "socks" that protect the valves. I have been told by a former soldier that the number of protective socks relative to the number of tubes is about what he remembers. By that he was answering my question whether each valve, or tube, should indeed be encased in such a sock.

I hope you like the following photos.

I have one more part to go before I display the radio. The part I need is a protective guard for one of the aerials that would be mounted on armored vehicles. If I don't locatre one this spring at one of the military vehicle resotation club shows I may ask your help in tracking one down.

Regards

Brian

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Here's a photo of the inside of the box showing the valves and the fabric diagram of the valves contained within. The ones to the right on the diagram are the valves stored under the rack as you will see in the last photo.

Regards

Brian

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In this photo you can see the valves on the removed rack with one of the protective socks removed. Quite often these protectors as well as the fabric diagram as missing in these sets that are being offered to collectors. I'm happy to have gotten a complete one. The fabric strap for removing and returning the valves from and to the container can also be seen in this photo.

Regards

Brian

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This is the view of the three valves located underneath the rack as indicated on the fabric diagram noted in the second photo of this series.

Now for one more part and I can display the radio as I have been planning. I was offered a half track truck to mount this radio in but I declined as that would be pushing the whole collecting thing too far for my budget and available space. Tempting though.... :lol:

Regards and stay tuned for more on this project.

Brian

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Brian

You lucky person, love the 19 set and have been trying to get one myself but not a lot I can find in UK

Gary

Hi Gary,

I do feel lucky indeed.

I want to display the radio as if is were in an armoured vehicle and have been looking for the aerial guard for two years now. Earlier this week we made one in the company's machine shop, I've just primed it last evening in my shop here at home. It's not an exact copy but close enough for the display.

Here's a photo.

Regards

Brian

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I've just started on the finished display for the WS19 MKII and here is the aerial guard painted and mounted on the display. The radio is in place but is still to be hooked up and I just added a remote unit which allows the WS19 MKII to be used as a telephone exchange connected to the main base, or HQ, by wireless. I've also added a field telephone type L and a Fuller (field) Phone to the collection which I hope will both be connected to the WS19 MKII in the finshed display.

Anyway, here is the next step in this project.

Regards

Brian

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Hi Dave,

Thanks for the information.

I would like to get the set up and running but I may not be able to do that as a fellow in the office told me that I would probably require a license to operate an SW unit.

Hi Brian,

Congratulations on obtaining a 19 Set.

Yes, you'll need to get a licence to operate this radio if you decide to make it operational. Your best option would be to obtain an amateur radio licence. The regulations have been relaxed over the years, and there is no longer a requirement to pass the morse code (CW). BTW, CW stands for "Continuous Wave" and not "Carrier Wave)". Refer to the Radio Amateurs of Canada website for licensing details: http://www.rac.ca/en/amateur-radio/beginner-info/

There are a number of amateurs who have restored old military radio equipment and regularly talk to each other with them. I see that you are in Ontario, which has quite a few active amateurs operating 19 sets and other boat anchors. One amateur in New Brunswick, turns on his 19 set every Nov 11th and anyone making contact with his station receives a nice commemorative certificate. I was able to make contact with him this past Nov 11th. This link contains old information on their activities, but it'll give you an idea of what these amateurs are doing with their 19 sets: http://lists.tempe.gov/admin/WA.EXE?A2=ind9712&L=boatanchors&P=11221

As well, they should be able to help you find spare parts and eventually get your 19 set on the air, should you decide to go that route.

For anyone interested in Canadian Military Communications, from the Boer War until the present, a visit to the Communications and Electronics Museum at Canadian Forces Base Kingston is a must.

Here is a link to their website: http://www.c-and-e-museum.org/eng_foyer.html

Jean-Paul

VE9BK

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Thanks for the additional information Jean-Paul.

It is an interesting area of study and to be able to restore this radio to operational condition would be great.

Regards

Brian

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I have completed my WS19 MKII with the exception of the grill work that protects the front of the radio and the canvas cover. Those I will continue to search for. The display shows the WS19 MkII as it would be set up and ready for service. The unit on the top (middle) of the radio is the remote control unit that turns the WS19 from just a wireless comunications divice into a base for a field phone network. The calls come and go through wires but the signal to HQ etc. remains wireless.

It has taken me two years to get to this point and I am very happy to finally have it mounted for display. It will probably take an equal amount of time to find the grill. Actually there are two grills one for each component of the main radio.

In the second photo is my communications collection, most of which would form the network of field telephones which would tie into the WS19 MkII.

There is just something about these less than glamourous collection of valves (tubes) and wires that attracts me. I'd love to fire her up but I fear that is exactly what I would accomplish....a fire! :whistle:

Thanks to all who have added to my knowledge of the Wireless Set No. 19 Mark II and to those who have tolerated this two year long post.

Regards

Brian

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This is my communication collection.

The unit under the WS19 and to the viewer's left is a Fullerphone (also written as "Fuller Phone"). This is a field phone and was developed during WWI. I will not get into the history of these units in this post but will open another separate post later to discuss them in detail (Zzzzzz). The Fullerphone could be part of the field telephone system along with the WS19.

To the viewer's right is the Field Telephone "L" which could also be connected to the WS19. These were used during WWII and later, possibly into the Korean War ear, but don't quote me on that. If any of the members have this information please add it to this post.

On the bottom left is a Forward Observation Telephone as would be used in the anti aircraft batteries along the English coast. I don't have a photo of one in use but I've seen them in photos and on documentries. The microphone is chest mounted, a hands-free device (so much for hands-free communications being something modern). I cannot see whay this unit could not tie into the WS19 as well but I'm not sure it would have been.

To the bottom right is a Canadian Signals Corps stachel with the third head set/microphone for the WS19, the other two being plugged into the radio on the top of the display.

There is a shallow drawer in this display unit which will be used for manuals and various odds and ends relating to the Signas Corps as they come my way.

I hope you like my small communications collection.

Regards

Brian.

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Nice display, very impressive. In Centurions the selector boxes to the left of the WS 19 (as you look at it) had a position for ITT (Infantry-Tank Telephone). This was a handset attached to the back of the tank in an armoured steel box that had a flap on the bottom. You dropped the flap pulled on the handset which was attached to a retractable cord-reel and after pressing the buzzer could communicate with the crew if they were closed down. We also used it for forward observation. The tank would be completely hidden behind a hill , in a gully, wadi, whatever and a member of the crew, usually the driver would run the handset out to a position where he could spot targets. The targets would be soft-skinned vehicles, buildings etc, that you would engage with HE. The observer would call the shots and then make any necessary corrections. Those on the receiveing end would have no clue where they were coming from.

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Nice display, very impressive. In Centurions the selector boxes to the left of the WS 19 (as you look at it) had a position for ITT (Infantry-Tank Telephone). This was a handset attached to the back of the tank in an armoured steel box that had a flap on the bottom. You dropped the flap pulled on the handset which was attached to a retractable cord-reel and after pressing the buzzer could communicate with the crew if they were closed down. We also used it for forward observation. The tank would be completely hidden behind a hill , in a gully, wadi, whatever and a member of the crew, usually the driver would run the handset out to a position where he could spot targets. The targets would be soft-skinned vehicles, buildings etc, that you would engage with HE. The observer would call the shots and then make any necessary corrections. Those on the receiveing end would have no clue where they were coming from.

Thanks Dave. Mine has no ITT position but I've seen the handset on the Centurion at an Armoured Vehicle display a couple of years ago. Also thanks for the additional information, it's this sort of participation that makes the GMIC a great forum to belong to.

Regards

Brian

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Hi - Brian. The one thing I have learnt on this Forum is that anything and everything with a military background is collected. Some people collect medals - as you do - but as you have shown here, there is also great satisfaction in collecting and restoring less glamorous equipment.

So quickly do items become obsolete that if you showed a modern-day radio operator this set, he would be lost. Congratulations on taking the time and trouble to restore a great old item. (wish I came under that category...)

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Hi - Brian. The one thing I have learnt on this Forum is that anything and everything with a military background is collected. Some people collect medals - as you do - but as you have shown here, there is also great satisfaction in collecting and restoring less glamorous equipment.

So quickly do items become obsolete that if you showed a modern-day radio operator this set, he would be lost. Congratulations on taking the time and trouble to restore a great old item. (wish I came under that category...)

Thanks for your comments Mervyn.

The other radios in the collection are equally interesting and I will be posting them with descriptions later. I really get excited about these pieces of equipment. Without the Signals Corps the military would be blind. Information and communications is a very powerful tool whether in war, business or just in personal relationships.

There is a Universal Carrier (Bren Gun Carrier) being sold on eBay at the moment and I told Linda it would be a great place to display the WS19. She said I could purchase it only on the condition I could sleep in it. I'm not sure if she was kidding or not but I think I'd better pass on this purchase. :unsure: Checkout eBay.ca number 300382265332, it's good for another 3 days. Also check out You Tube for a video of this machine in operation by the owner. The link is listed below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?gl=CA&hl=en&v=QoiKoYaLpQo

Sorry I can't import this link, I tried but I seem to be as obsolete as the WS19 when it comes to computer magic.

Regards

Brian

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Hello Everyone,

It has taken over two years to complete this display of my WS19 MKII but finally that day has arrived. The communications display has been moved to its new home in my study and the final peices for the WS 19, the protective grills, have been installed. These grills are very hard to find and most of the time you will see the WS19 installed in restored vehicles with the grills missing. The grills provided protection from falling equipment and rifle butt impacts which would break gauges and knock the knobs off the unit.

I hope you like the following photos of the complete communications collection as well as the closer views of the WS19 MKII itself.

Thanks for staying with this post to its long and drawn out conclusion. Now to start on a Universal Carrier (Bren Gun Carrier) to mount the radio in. ;)

Regards

Brian

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Here is a closer couple of views of the radio itself. Please remember to click on the photos for a larger, though still small, view.

Regards

Brian

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