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Quick clue,

The ship with the same name never fired a shot in anger. Her strength was her ability to keep the peace by her awesome presence.

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You sly old dog :lol:

HMVS Cerberus

Right?

Not Cerberus, but you are soooo close,

Here another tip, Four ships and one shore establishment of the Royal Navy have had the name.The pride of Queen Victoria, HMS ........ revolutionised warship construction.

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Great work Simon!!!! :jumping:

The operational headquarters of the Royal Navy HMS Warrior

Four ships and one shore establishment of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Warrior.

HMS Warrior - was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line launched in 1781. She became a receiving ship after 1818, a convict ship after 1840, and was broken up in 1857.

HMS Warrior - was the first ironclad ocean-going armoured battleship, and was launched in 1860. She became a depot ship in 1902, was renamed HMS Vernon III in 1904, and hulked as HMS Warrior in 1923. She was handed over for preservation as Warrior in 1979, and is preserved at Portsmouth as a museum ship.

HMS Warrior - was a Duke of Edinburgh class armoured cruiser launched in 1905. She was disabled at the battle of Jutland in 1916 and foundered a day later.

HMS Warrior - was a Colossus-class light fleet aircraft carrier launched in 1944, having had her name changed from HMS Brave in 1942. She was loaned to Canada from 1946 to 1948, then sold to Argentina and renamed ARA Independencia in 1958.

HMS Warrior - was the name assigned to the operational headquarters of the Royal Navy in Northwood, London from 1963. The base became the Joint Headquarters in 1996, before being decommissioned in 1999 to become the Joint Services Headquarters.

In April 1963 the Naval unit at Northwood was commissioned as HMS Warrior and in September 1971 the Royal Navy took over responsibility for the whole site. In 1978 the Flag Officer Submarines also moved his Headquarters to Northwood

Regards Eddie

Edited by Taz

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Phew!!!

Here is a give away, but a very interesting fact.

What is the oldest commissioned ship in the world?

HMS Victory,

The HMS Victory stands today as the "world's oldest commissioned warship". Still manned by Officers and Ratings of the Royal Navy, the Victory has seen over 200 years of almost continuous service.

Edited by Taz

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Spot on :cheers:

Simon an easier one to finish off until later tonight.

This ship was designed to penetrate enemy harbours at speed and sink anchored ships.

They would really get the point!!

Regards Eddie

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HMS Polyphemus :rolleyes:

Grats Simon :jumping: that's her. :D

Three ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Polyphemus, after the Polyphemus of Greek mythology.

The first Polyphemus was a 64-gun third-rate launched in 1782, active in the Napoleonic Wars, converted to a powder hulk in 1813 and broken up in 1827.

The second Polyphemus was a wooden paddlewheel sloop launched in 1840 and wrecked off Jutland in 1856.

The third Polyphemus was a torpedo ram in use from 1881 to 1903.

A fourth Polyphemus was to have been an Centaur class aircraft carrier of 18,300 tons, 650 ft long, but was cancelled in October 1945.

The centre torpedo tube was fitted with a combined cast steel bow cap and ram. It hinged upwards to open, and considerable effort went into selecting the best hydrodynamic design through model testing since its size and location were found to have a major impact on the ship?s performance.

Regards Eddie

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Who was the real "Master and Commander" and the command of which ship bought him fame, notoriety and his fortune?

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Who was the real "Master and Commander" and the command of which ship bought him fame, notoriety and his fortune?

O'Brian based his character on the real life exploits of Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald.

An extraordinary career plagued with controversy

Cochrane had one of the most extraordinary and controversial naval careers of the 19th century. He entered the Royal Navy as a midshipman in 1793 and was quickly promoted on merit to lieutenant two years later. However, it was during his early appointment as Master and Commander of the sloop Speedy that Cochrane came to fame, fortune and notoriety.

Regards Eddie.

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Correctamondo, you da man :lol:

I thought you said RN trivia wasn't your area seems like you are making a pretty good job of it :jumping:

Edited by Simon F

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Correctamondo, you da man :lol:

I thought you said RN trivia wasn't your area seems like you are making a pretty good job of it :jumping:

;) Cheers Simon,

It isn't, but it's a very Interesting and a fun way to learn more about the RN and it's History.

HMS Rust? :speechless1: The Giant better have a Gordon's at the palace!

Now what's all that about? :D

Regards Eddie.

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Thanks Eddie, I am glad Christophe and yourself are finding this a pleasant way of learning more about RN history. Indeed the participation and impressive level of questions posed here are testing my knowledge base and I am adding to my repertoire as we go along. As with all things, I am more able in some areas than in others.

;) Cheers Simon,

It isn't, but it's a very Interesting and a fun way to learn more about the RN and it's History.

HMS Rust? :speechless1: The Giant better have a Gordon's at the palace!

Now what's all that about? :D

Regards Eddie.

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Thanks Eddie, I am glad Christophe and yourself are finding this a pleasant way of learning more about RN history. Indeed the participation and impressive level of questions posed here are testing my knowledge base and I am adding to my repertoire as we go along. As with all things, I am more able in some areas than in others.

Glad you like the questions :D

Btw there was another question in the post :P

Regards Eddie.

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Oooopps a few glasses of ros? and a chinese and everything goes to pot!! :anmatcat:

:D

Note to oneself: Must pay attention :rolleyes:

Glad you like the questions :D

Btw there was another question in the post :P

Regards Eddie.

Edited by Simon F

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HMS Rust? :speechless1: The Giant better have a Gordon's at the palace!

Now what's all that about? :D

A little hint,

She was nearly Brazilian and Turkish but ended up British.

Regards Eddie

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Another clue,

She was the fourth and last ship in the starboard column of the Grand Fleet (This was the 6th Division of the 1st Battle Squadron)

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HMS Agincourt

Built by Armstrong, laid down September 1911, commissioned August 1914, cost estimated ?2,900,000.

Size:

Length 668 feet waterline 671 feet 6inches overall, beam 89 feet, draught 29feet 10inches (mean deep), displacement 24,792 tons light 30,860 tons deep.

Propulsion:

4 shaft Parsons turbines, 34,000 shp, 22kts.

Trials: 40,129 shp = 22.42 knots

Armour:

9-4in belt, 9-2in barbettes, 12in turret faces, 2.5-1in decks.

Armament:

14 x 12in 45cal MK XIII (7 x 2), 20 x 6in (20 x 1), 10 x 3in (12 x 1), 3 x 21in TT.

Comments:

Originally ordered for Brazil as Rio de Janeiro but during construction the Brazilian government ran into financial difficulties and sold the ship to the Ottoman government and was renamed Sultan Osman I. Ship was expropriated (seized) by the Royal Navy in August 1914 and renamed Agincourt. Heavily armed with a record 14 main guns and a heavy secondary armament resulting in a long ship. Speed was also slightly higher than normal but protection was poor. Crew 1,109.

World War 1 Service:

25 August 1914 joined the 4th Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet.

Transferred to the 1st Battle Squadron 1915.

Present at the Battle of Jutland. Fired 144 12in rounds and received no damage.

Transferred to the 2nd Battle Squadron in late 1918.

December 1922 sold for scrap.

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Simon, once again grats, it was the HMS Agincourt :jumping:

I'll explain the cryptic question:

HMS Rust? :speechless1:The Giant better have a Gordon's at the palace!

Now what's all that about? :D

HMS Rust, The Giant and The Gin (Gordons) Palace were all nicknames of the HMS Agincourt.

HMS Rust - During 4 month hiatus during building, while sale of ship from Brazil to Turkey was negotiated, ship took on a red patina.

The Giant - Popular nickname in Newcastle, while she was being built.

The Gin Palace - came from her luxurious fittings (which may have led to the original high cost to the Brazilians) and a corruption of her name (A Gin Court), Pink Gin having been a popular drink among Royal Navy officers at the time.

And Clues:

She was nearly Brazilian and Turkish but ended up British.

The Ship with many names, she was laid down as the Rio de Janeiro was then called the Sultan Osman I.

The Royal Navy selected the name HMS Agincourt, after the victory of King Henry V against the French in the 100 Years War.

She was the fourth and last ship in the starboard column of the Grand Fleet (This was the 6th Division of the 1st Battle Squadron)

The 6th Division of the 1st Battle Squadron comprised of HMS Marlborough (flag), HMS Revenge, HMS Hercules and HMS Agincourt.

The photo you posted is also interesting because it shows HMS Erin. This was the second of the two ships originally built for the Turkish navy and was called the Reshadieh before becoming the HMS Erin

Regards Eddie

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This is probably a give away but very interesting

I was the first ship to carry the name of an heroic WWI defence.

What ship am I and what am I famous for?

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This is probably a give away but very interesting

I was the first ship to carry the name of an heroic WWI defence.

What ship am I and what am I famous for?

Hmm well there was HMS Mons, but that was a tactical retreat rather than a defense.

The class might help ;)

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