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The badge in post 163 - is the enamel definitely green? It appears Cambridge blue on my screen, could it just be a variation in the use of a blue?

The scallop shells in the Grimsby coat of arms represent the holiday resorts around the Grimsby coast.

Hello Leigh, The colour does definitively appear to be a green instead of a blue.

Kevin

Edited by SCcollector

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RE :- Grimsby. During my rooting around yesterday I came across an intriguing piece of information relating to the town. The images relating to this topic were, unfortunately, copyrighted so I will attempt to explain the content.

There is in existence at Grimsby the original Roll of Honour for Grimsby County Borough Fire Brigade 1914 - 1918.

The Roll lists numerous firemen under the two headings 'Regular Firemen' and 'Special Firemen'.

A few questions come to mind on which members might perhaps give me guidance. Was Grimsby Fire Brigade run by the Borough Police during the Great War? This was very common practice in urban areas prior to WW11 but I can find no definitive answer in relation to Grimsby.

If this was the case, were the 'Special Firemen' sworn in as Special Constables for the conflict and then used exclusively to work alongside the regular 'fire bobbies'?

Are there any other examples from other parts of the Country?

I have not come across this term before and would welcome any commnet(s).

Kevin

Prior to WW2 there were some 1,600 fire brigades in Britain. In some areas - such as Nottingham City - the police force was also responsible for the local fire brigade.

Nottingham City Police Fire Brigade

In 1938 the all volunteer Auxilliary Fire Service was established to provide a back-up to the various local brigades. In 1941 the National Fire Service was set-up by amalgamating the AFS the local brigades.

In 1947 the NFS was abolished and fire services returned to local government but with only County Borough and County Councils having responsibilty.

Edited by NickLangley

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So often the civic-minded individual who joined the Special Constabulary had served in the military. Others served with other organizations at the same time as they were a Special Constable. I will endevor to post some of the groups in my collection that includes the Special Constabuary L.S.G.C. Medal.

The first is a group awarded to:

R. (Robert) Hunt A.B. R.N.

The WWI Victory Medal medal is to R. Hunt and the Special Constabulary Medal is named Robert Hunt.

The BWM is unnamed, the original name being carefully erased.

The ribbon bar shown came with the group but I do not believe it was prat of the original group. I have tried to find out more about Robert Hunt but there seems to be nothing in the National Archives. Perhaps with luck I will be able to add more information at a later date when it becomes available.

The ribbon bar is attached to the original card that came from the manufacturer.

Regards

Brian

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I had a root around amongst my stored stuff and dug out a Nottingham County Special Constabulary certificate of service.

How do I upload a photo?

Edited by NickLangley

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I had a root around amongst my stored stuff and dug out a Nottingham County Special Constabulary certificate of service.

How do I upload a photo?

I save the photo to my desk top, then import in into my Photoshop7 (soon to be Photoshop8, when I get loaded). With the Photoshop I resize the photo to 25%. Once this is done I then follow the directions on the GMIC and bingo it is on the post.

You may have to resize your photo to 20% due to restrictions. If you don't have Photoshop then I am lost.

Perhaps the other members will be of more help.

Good luck.

Regards

Brian

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Nice group Brian - I wouldn't say the SC medal in this combination , is that common. Has to be a possibility that he joined for the Great Strike of 1926 ?

That may very well be as if he were to have joined the Specials for the Second World War the SC Medal would have been King George VI not V.

An interesting suggestion Mervyn and one, I must admit, had not entered my mind - though it is a small target.

Regards

Brian

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Nottingham County Special Constabulary certificate of service.

County Councils didn't receive official coats of arms until the 1930s so in this instance they made one up. This didn't go down very well with the College of Arms and they subsequently ordered the police authority to desist.

As a stop-gap (until 1937 when Nottinghamshire Council received its official grant) the county constabulary used the chairman of the police authority's personal coat of arms - often called the peacock crest.

Edited by NickLangley

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Nottingham County Special Constabulary certificate of service.

County Councils didn't receive official coats of arms until the 1930s so in this instance they made one up. This didn't go down very well with the College of Arms and they subsequently ordered the police authority to desist.

As a stop-gap (until 1937 when Nottinghamshire Council received its official grant) the county constabulary used the chairman of the police authority's personal coat of arms - often called the peacock crest.

Hello Nick,

Another very fine example. I was particularly interested in learning about the mischief with the Coat of Arms. Thank you very much for sharing it.

Kevin B

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Nottingham County Special Constabulary certificate of service.

County Councils didn't receive official coats of arms until the 1930s so in this instance they made one up. This didn't go down very well with the College of Arms and they subsequently ordered the police authority to desist.

As a stop-gap (until 1937 when Nottinghamshire Council received its official grant) the county constabulary used the chairman of the police authority's personal coat of arms - often called the peacock crest.

Hi Nick, Cheshire Constabulary were another force that got into trouble with the College of Arms.From there inseption they used the Prince of Wales feathers, many years later the college pointed that they had no permission to do so. The Prince then gave his permission and they carried on using them until the early 70s. Being an awkward sod I didn't change my collar dogs for many years until promotion when I was issued with new uniforms. Ian

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Hello,

Here is the latest addition to my Special Constabulary Brassard collection. It is an aluminum disk 63mm in diameter and 78mm at the widest point which includes the belt or strap loops. The straps are made of leather and in need of some care as they are starting to dry out a bit.

This brassard is from the Berkshire Constabulary.

Regards

Brian

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You have to feel an awful lot of sympathy for collectors in years to come. Nowadays UK police forces are quite happy to issue generic insignia of an incredibly low quality - usually little more than stickers on the ubiquitous high visibility jackets.

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You have to feel an awful lot of sympathy for collectors in years to come. Nowadays UK police forces are quite happy to issue generic insignia of an incredibly low quality - usually little more than stickers on the ubiquitous high visibility jackets.

Hello Brian,

This is another Berkshire brassard issued without an identifying number.

Kind regards,

Kevin

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Hello,

Taking up on Nick's point, here are another two examples from Berkshire, this time lapel badges, with a lot of detailed work.

Kind regards,

Kevin

Edited by SCcollector

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Hello Brian,

Picking up on your question about Windsor Castle. Yes, it is in Berkshire and I lived a few miles away from Windsor for many happy years. Berkshire is a lovely county. Out of interest, I have attached a couple of images of Windsor SC badges , one of which is very similar to the county issue.

Kind regards,

Kevin

Edited by SCcollector

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Even more interesting than the former Windsor Borough police was Eton College's very own police force. I don't know anything much about it but I presume it had a similar type of jurisdiction to the former Oxford University Police - the Bulldogs.

Here's a link to a picture of the Eton College Police badge.

Eton Colllege Police

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Hi - Kevin. Interesting that with your two identical lapel badges - one has an earlier pattern Crown, than the second. Obviously made at the same time - but, I would think different makers. Does it give any details on reverse. Have been reading the Northumberland archive again - when I have time. Apart from the interest of a new Force being eastablished for an emergency - it also has a lot of valuable info. on how people lived. Just never mention wheelbarrows to me again.... Mervyn

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Hi Mervyn,

The Berks badge is marked 'sterling silver' with no makers name. The Windsor is marked 'Botley & Lewin, Reading'. The other badges have no makers names.

Out of interest, I have been in contact with the local museum at Alnwick and have started to share the documents with them. Hopefully, they may also trace some of the people mentioned in the file. I will try to find the time to upload or copy some other pages soon. If you think the wheel barrows etc.. are heavy duty, you should see the inventories of all the farms (including live stock) which I wouldn't inflict on anybody.

Kevin

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Hi Kevin,

Thanks for the interesting additions to the thread. I would have never thought there was so much material "out there" and I'm glad that the GMIC has allowed this space to gather it all together in one place. The Berkshire brassard without the number is interesting indeed. I wonder which one came first?

This is not a competition as to who has the oldest brassard by the way. :lol:

Thanks to all for keeping this thread alive.

Regards

Brian

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Hello All,

I am uploading some images from Bradford City Special Constabulary which might be of interest. This first example is a WW1 Lapel Badge in Enamel and Brass.

Kevin

Edited by SCcollector

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Here is an example of the WW11 Lapel Badge in Chrome and Enamel. Although not Special Constabulary, I have added examples of the Police War Reserve, and First Police Reserve badges out of interest.

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