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4. Nice enamel brooch. Especially on the back it's possible to see that the manufacturer used cheaper metals. I presume from that it was done as a mass production during WW1.

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5. Here is the brooch what I think is one of the kind - made privatelly from RDF cap badge. Looks like its nicelly gilded from enlisted men cap badge.

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6. Nice quality silver piece with the green enamel scroll - this type of flames were used for a short period as a officer's insignia. This one is maker marked: "STERLING SILVER" and "H&H" what is probably unknown Irish maker. Green scroll (inidcates Emerald Isle?) and short "R" from Royal may indicate period of drouble times after the war 1918-1921?

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7. My next Royal Dublin Fusiliers brooch is made from silver by Frederick Narborough, Birmingham, 1914. This is my favourite – very interesting and beautiful design.

One unusual detail as well – usually on the official Royal Dublin Fusiliers Coat of Arms “Tiger” as a symbol of 1st Battalion (previously 102nd. Regiment of Foot (Royal Madras Fusiliers)) bears top of 2nd Battalion “Elephant” (103rd. Regiment of Foot (Royal Bombay Fusiliers)). But on this brooch “Elephant” is on the top. Because that, I presume that the brooch was made for a family members and to the “sweethearts” from 2nd Battalion soldiers. Also this battalion stationed in England 1914 and landed in France with the BEF August 1914. What to you guys think about this theory?

Also because silver is lost lots of his shiny colour, what to you recommend, is there any point to clean it or I should leave it (like a coins – can ruin the value instead with the cleaning. Meantime I take it more as costume jewellery and maybe should fresh it a little).

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A nice specialised collection - I also prefer no.7. Medals are really only not cleaned in collections because silver

is soft and becomes worn. The same applies to any silver item - however, were they mine - I would give them an

occasional light clean with a quality silver polish. Dutch made Hagerty's is excellent. Well done. Mervyn

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Good Morning Gentlemen......

There is a fantastic book on Sweet Heart Pins / Broaches......

MILITARY SWEETHEARTS by Pamela M. Caunt

ISBN 0 9523709 0 5

Very well illustrated and priced (wellout of date).....

I have a first edition but I understand that this book has been updated by the author....... It has sweethearts that date back to 1890......

Mike

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Hi Mervyn,

As a long time collector of insignia and other military stuff, I find Sweetheart Broaches mixed with official military badges on all militaria stalls. Sometimes they are advertised as "rare unit badges" only for specialist memers of the unit, and sometimes as "souvenirs". So, for all it is hard to distinguish a sweetheart badge... To me the pin broach (generaly speaking) gives it away, but during and after the war(s) many of these insignia were sold as lapel badges.

Thus, I did not incorporate thes in my collection, but i have some left which I will add, as either.

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One more what do not fit into my Royal Dublin Fusiliers collection (and thats whay want to trade it) but can be something much more valuable then sweetheart brooch - a Irish war pipe piper plade brooch. It is pretty big, a 1,67 inch diameter (4,3 cm), made in Birmingham, 1887 by be F.Narborough (Green Street, Doriton, Birmingham).

I have been advised that this can be one of the earliest Irish regimental Irish War Pipe shoulder plade brooch.

Because pipers are poorly recrded (one of the earliest after 1881 was 1887 Irish Fusiliers, 1903 Leinster Regiment, etc. And of course the best recorded Tynaside Irish who used Irish War Pipes during WW1), then it is very hard to trace it (if there isn't a picture around of the Connaught piper with that brooch).

Like I had been advised, pipers were first regimentally funded and their regulation was entirely down to the Regimental Colonel and Army dress authorities didn't had much to follow.

I had been advised that the only official pipers insignia to the Connaught Rangers in the RACD list of changes are the following

Pattern number 3585/1921 Brooch for Kilt Sgt Pipers & Pipers sealed 27/10/1921 WO359, vol. 16 page 180 authority. 54/infy/4643.

Pattern 3596/1921 Badges Bonnet GM & GS with shanks And pin sgt pipers & pipers sealed 12/12/1921 WO359, VOL16, PAGE 181 authority. 54/infy/4643.

So, any advise and help would be great!

Meantime similar brooch (only different centre) is listed up on sale here: http://www.regimentalbrooches.com/shop.php?c=377

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The Connaught Rangers plaid brooch is a lovely piece - as you say only the size prevents confusion with a

sweetheart brooch. Plaid Brooches are of course a separate collecting field and we haven't seen for a while.

Odulf : Your HMS Vanguard was for Britain's last surviving battleship. She brought the King and Queen & the

Princesses for a State Visit to South Africa in 1947. I was told that these pins were to give to the public to remember the Visit.

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Hello Gents,

Another referencebook is thisone written by K.W. Jarmin. It is more or less a catalogue and devided in different types. It's approx value ( book written in 1981) is also mentioned.

kind regards,

Jef

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Odulf : Your HMS Vanguard was for Britain's last surviving battleship. She brought the King and Queen & the

Princesses for a State Visit to South Africa in 1947. I was told that these pins were to give to the public to remember the Visit.

Thanks for this information Mervyn!

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Interesting to see how many people have written on Sweetheart Brooches. A relatively new collecting field so,

a lot of interest. Joanna Lumley - the famous comedienne - has written a series of three books. Also very

good references.

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My one and only sweetheart brooch ................

Hallmarked silver, by Frederick Narborough, Birmingham, 1915.

Edited by Robin Lumsden

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This is one I gave my wife, whose father was from Newfoundland.

A very well made lady's compact, with powder dispenser, and slots for coins.

Hopefully her man was one of those who returned. I've been to Beaumont-Hamel.

Michael

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That's a very beautiful one, Michael. The badges of Newfoundland Rgt are very rare, and this is a sweetheart badge. Thanks for showing.

Jef

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Hi guys,

After busy day of spending money, I will sell two of my brooches. Before I stick them up for a sale, I would like to ask advise of the price and also maker marks on them.

1. VERY nice gold and diamond Royal Artillery sweetheart brooch. There is stamping on the back and some number. No idea what the number means but the stamp I presume shows gold contest. Any help with the value?

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2. Next one is again I think from gold and shows King Edward VII initials. So, I presume it's made around 1901-1910. With the maker marks.

Again, what something like that would be worth?

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Hi - have had a look at your two brooches.

The first one does not have a hallmark and is probably gilt - probably on silver. The diamonds are missing in a few places - and from

the photo I would say they are marquisite - rather then diamonds. This was a popular form of decoration.

The number looks like 10S1 - if so, then it is probably a pattern number. The number scratched onto the reverse is

probably a jewellers identification mark - this was very common on repaired items - or, it may be a pawn shop no. ?

With the small damage to the enamel, I would estimate about 30 -40 pounds ($48 - 64) - but check catalogues.

The second one - the Edward 7th. - is an attractive design. It is made of silver, which has been gilded. However,

whilst the marks show the Birmingham mint, the shape around the letters is wrong for that period and the 'D' is

totally the wrong shape. A mystery - did Ireland at that time use a different shaped letter for the year ? Ask

a jeweller ?

Value for this one - perhaps 50 pounds ($80).

Best wishes. Mervyn

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8. Here is my new pick up. This sweetheart brooch is slightly different; First at all, there are no name or used Royal Dublin Fusiliers insignia but instead carries owner's initials on the centre Mother of Pearl piece. Secondly size of it - it's massive (to compare it, I have one picture below with the normal size QSA medal) and last there is a little chamber on the back (for a hair?).

Owner of that brooch was Sergeant James Monaghan, who served with the 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers in South Africa 1899-1902.

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Next small beauty what I picked up from Dublin yesterday!

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I missed the May 28th post. This is a lovely piece - probably the Boer War period. I think it must represent a flaming grenade - I

doubt that they are diamonds and not marquisite. Perhaps chips ? The little opening makes it into a locket - as you say perhaps

for a lock of hair.

Number 47 is similar to a previous example you had - more of a standard design. You are fortunate to be able to buy these

for a rare Regiment. Mervyn

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Sweetheart Brooches are not unknown in the US. Soon after I arrived in my first unit overseas, I sent my mother a bracelet charm, a gilt miniature of my regimental distinctive unit insignia (68th Armor regiment), which she kept for the rest of her life. The wife got a miniature of the Drill Instructor's Badge (irreverently known as the 'Pumpkin Patch').

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DM - I think the idea spread across a lot of Countries. Australia and Sth. Africa certainly had them - and as far back as the Boer War.

Do you have any examples you could post ? Mervyn

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