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The shoulder flash is indeed that of the Australian Flying Corps which "was raised in 1915 as No.1 Half Flight AFC for service in Mesoptamia, No's 1 to 4 Squadrons AFC being raised during 1916." (Distinguishing Colour Patches of the Australian Military Forces by Keith Glyde).

The official history describes them as (Aust.) Squadrons R.F.C.

The shoulder flash shown was worn from 1917 - 1919, and unofficial versions had a brass numeral to the centre which indicated the squadron.

Stuart

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Yes Mervyn, the shoulder title reads Australia. If it wasn't for the flash we'd all say he was a standard digger.

Stuart, thanks for the confirmation. There can't be too many photos around showing the Australian RFC flash being worn compared to other formations so I'm quite pleased I have it.

Tony

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Nearly 3 months since our last post on Australia ! That will never do - we have too much to talk about.

This little item came-in with a box of badges and I find it not only interesting - but, also very poignant. His name was Larkin and it looks like Benoni - which is in Sth. Africa ? - might follow that. There is also some scratching under his name , which I can't make out. This is a 'sweetheart' brooch - the question being, was the enamelled badge made specially for this - or, is it a mess dress collar ? Could be WW1 or, WW2 - what happened to him - did he survive - always things that I think about when I see these pieces. Every Country has them - see if we can find anything more about Pte (?) Larkin. Mervyn

Edited by Mervyn Mitton

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Hello Mervyn,

I'd have a guess at the badge being made for the purpose of a sweetheart brooch rather than a collar dog being made into a brooch and then enamelled.

I've just had a quick look at the Australian archives which turned up 147 records for a Larkin for the dates 1914 to 1918, of course, not all records were military related. I looked up WWI records purely because of the MKIII Enfield behind the rising sun.

Let's hope someone can find the correct Larkin.

Tony

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To all,

After looking through all my references during the week the only badge that I can find that comes even close to that described by Tom is a local New South Wales state Infantry Battalion badge. The pictures is posted below. It has been taken from Part 1 of the Cossum badge book. I have also inquired with those dealers and fellow collectors far more knowledgeable than I in Sydney to no avail.

I hope that this has helped if only to reduce the list of badge suspects.

Regards,

Rob

No, that's not it. I got it at a coin shop in Cincinnati, along with my first 1914EK2 and Pickelhaube, both long gone, a half century ago, so I remember it fairly well, although I can't for the life of me remember what I had for lunch yesterday :unsure:

The roo was on all fours and the boomerang was definitely a clear plastic type material. I think there was a sunburst.

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Re. the question that started the thread, here is a collar badge of the 1st pattern Rising Sun as used in Boer war. It just sold on ebay for the best part of AU$1300.

C

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Colin - that's brilliant. Five pages and that is the first fully identified version for the Boer War (1899-1902). The question now - is, did this pattern extend to the full size slouch hat badge ? The price is quite horrendous for a collar - Aust. $1300 is nearly £650 or US $1000.

Obviously an indication of it's rarity. We did raise the question earlier about whether in the Boer War they wore Regt. insignia - rather then National emblems ?

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Because this is an Australian item - and was a badge of office - I am showing this truncheon on our Aust. sub-forum. However, because a truncheon is also Police related, it's main post will be under Brit. & Commonwealth Police.

Decorated truncheons for Australia are rare - and really only for the 19th. Century. This example is 1st. World War (1914- 1918) and has a most remarkable history. I recently had some photos sent to me of my remaining police collection and this piece came to my notice. There is a small white paper attached to the handgrip - however, I must admit I don't remember everything on it. I will have someone write it out and send over.

During WW1 the Allies captured many prisoners-of-war and had great difficulty in providing camps and food for them. Many were interned in the U.K., but many others were sent to friendly countries. Canada and Australia both featured on that list.

The camps that were set-up in Aust. were designated Concentration Camps - a word that is filled with horror today - but, 95 years ago it was merely a description. This truncheon - the only one I have ever seen with this legend - has large intertwined letters " GCC " I think this stood for Government Concentation Camp and there must have been a number of them spread throughout the Country. I have no idea of their locations and hopefully an Aust. member will be able to help ? There is also a camp number and an officer's number.

Presumably the Australian Govt. had to quickly set-up these camps and then find suitable warders - who must have had a uniform and this issue truncheon. Note the Rising Sun emblem at the top and naming - AUSTRALIA. The truncheon itself is a teak issue of the 1880's/1890/s period - they must have had stock put away.

I look forward to comments, observations and perhaps - if we are lucky - some background information on these POW Camps.

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Mervyn,

I googled Australian WWI concentration camps and found the following link at the NA where they refer to them as internment camps http://www.naa.gov.au/whats-on/online/feature-exhibits/internment-camps/WWI/index.aspx

There's a photo of a camp I think you may know of or at least heard of during your time as a serviceman, it's titled Military Concentration Camp Enoggera 1915.

Tony

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Thankyou for comments. So, it would appear we are right in thinking they were originally called Concentration Camps - later to be Internment Camps, which was obviously more politically correct. Tony, I will add your google ref. to the post I'm going to add on Police.

Any more info. from other members ?

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Mervyn,

I googled Australian WWI concentration camps and found the following link at the NA where they refer to them as internment camps http://www.naa.gov.a.../WWI/index.aspx

There's a photo of a camp I think you may know of or at least heard of during your time as a serviceman, it's titled Military Concentration Camp Enoggera 1915.

Tony

Seems to me I once visited Enoggera doing trials on military equipment, so I think it's still in military use. All I remember is heat and flies.

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