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I bought this a few years ago... have never gotten around to getting it researched past the enlistment form on Ancestry.com.

283356 Pte. S.H.Goodwin....

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I remember online ages ago finding something with "14th battalion" and "Hill70"... but no more.

I assume it being a QE2 cross that he died after WW2 for WW1 related wounds?

Is there any canuck out there that can help me on this one?

Thanks

Chris

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A QEII Cross means post 1952 service death... Possibly Korea?

Barring that, it would mean a service death on an early UN mission... But judging by the other medals, if it is indeed for him, my money would be on Korea.

ADDENDA: After re reading your statement "I assume it being a QE2 cross that he died after WW2 for WW1 related wounds?" I've NEVER heard of a cross being attributed so many years after the fact. Unless there's a fine print in the award criteria that I've never seen or even heard of, this man re enlisted and succumbed to wounds received under the reign of HRH EII. The only other possibility that I can imagine is that the cross isn't for him...

Isn't there his name and serial number on the back?

Edited by TacHel

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Everything on the attestation says 1916. The cross should have the royal cypher of George V even if the cross is a replacement cross or if for some weird reason the next of kin was only found 50 years later. The government has large stocks of spares with all cyphers.

The Canadian Memorial Cross, also known as the Mother's Cross or Silver Cross. All three possible cyphers, GVR, GVIR, EIIR.

This is really weird my friend...:unsure:

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Hi,

I remember ages and ages ago a WW1 Canadian collector told me about these crosses awarded loooong after the event (Guys whos death was because of war wounds) and that there were a few hundred QE2 crosses for WW1 deaths. Ditto for guys who died in the 50s of WW2 wounds... cross from the monarch who was sitting in the throne at the time of the death.

Would happily pay the costs if anyone lives near the canadian archives.

best

Chris

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Chris you are bang on with stating this is mostly likely issued for wounds received during ww1 even with the ER2 cypher. Its not overly common but i've seen several and even more with GEOvi cyphers. If a service mans life was shortened due to the wounds he received in the war his next of kin is eligible for the award. Many of these casualties had poor lung capacity thanks to being gassed and their deaths were link to this underlying condition.

In fact just recently i read of a cross being awarded to a man's family (within the past year or so) because he died of a fall at home when his knee gave out. It turned out it was the same knee that was severly wounded in ww2 and thus his wound was considered directly responsible for his death. Very bizarre.

Chris i need to get a couple guys researched if your interested i can have his name added to my list and my researcher can get me his file.

Cheers

Chris E

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Chris i need to get a couple guys researched if your interested i can have his name added to my list and my researcher can get me his file.

Cheers

Chris E

Would be great! Thanks.

I will paypal you the fees.

Best

Chris

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Chris,

I will echo Censlenov's comments. He is correct.

I have a Trio with a George VI memorial Cross (Died in 1945).

I also have a MM and Trio with a ERII Memorial Cross (Died in 1972). For this one I even have the paperwork concerning it's issue sent to his wife at the time.

By both of these dates the original George V Crosses had been depleted therefore the Cross of the current Monarch was issued. Unusual and not common, but in all respects correct.

Cheers,

Gary

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The remaining GVR crosses were used up in the early days of the Second War. I have one to sn RCAF doctor killed in 1941 in a Hudson crash on Sable Island (F/L Frederick Judson Bell). He's buried in Toronto's Mount Pleasant Cemetery, not far from another Dr. Fred B. who was also killed in a Hudson crash - Dr. Fred Banting).

Edited by Michael Johnson

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Very interesting topic. Funny, had I read this earlier today, I could have ordered his service file. I spent the morning at the Archives. To me, these little oddities are what keep me going in collecting.

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Hi Chris,

I remember when you bought this set. Very nice.

If the Halifax Rifles badge was also his, you may be looking for a man with WWI and WWII and possibly militia service as well as it's a WWII vintage item. This would entail ordering his WWI and post WWI files separately.

Cheers,

Adam

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Private Sidney Harold Goodwin late 219th Battalion, severely wounded 29 June 1917 at Lens with the 85th Battalion, died 1958, the interesting element is the ER2 memorial Cross confirmed as issued to his wife in 1958

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The fact he had 6 kids suggests he was too often absent from the fishing grounds.

Paul

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16 hours ago, paul wood said:

The fact he had 6 kids suggests he was too often absent from the fishing grounds.

Paul

Or enjoyed his shore leave a lot! ;)

 

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As Michael Johnson indicated in an earlier post, the remaining supplies of the George V Memorial Crosses were issued to men who died early in World War II.  I have one such cross that was issued to an officer who died of a heart attack on 31 October 1940 while on active service with No. III N.P.A.M. Training Centre at Saanich.  Interestingly the cross is named to MAJOR A. B. SLEE. M.C. who served in the Great War with the Royal Field Artillery. 

Slee rev.jpg

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