Chris Boonzaier

EK 1914
The simple WW1 EK2...

138 posts in this topic

Back then a source of pride... I am sure the recipients would roll over in their graves if they saw the bargain bins of crosses at shows today...

I used to me "anti maker mark" collecting, but at least it has given a certain value to EK2s....

On the back of this postcard a man of the 108th Schutzen Regiment proudly announces he has just been awarded the EK...

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Chris, where on earth did you get that magnificent card in the first post?

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Here is an old Liebig card form 1885 showing the awarding

of the 1813 Ek2.

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Chris, where on earth did you get that magnificent card in the first post?

Hi,

it was luck. I am always on the lookout for interesting EK things. There are millions of patriotic EK cards that are a collecting field all on their own, but these 4 centering around the pride of the wearers really interested me.

Best

Chris

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Here is a very interesting one of a soldier visiting his brothers grave... putting on his EK2 for the occasion..

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the handwriting is terrible, and I am not sure if there is anything relevant to the occasion....

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Weren't EKIIs issued to more or less anyone doing his job in the front line from say about 1917 onwards or am I wrong in thinking that? If they were, was the cross still a source of pride for them?

I know in WWII they were issued to men not expected to survive their wounds, do you know if the same happened in the Great War?

Great cards though, I think I must have a few like that myself.

Tony

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Weren't EKIIs issued to more or less anyone doing his job in the front line from say about 1917 onwards or am I wrong in thinking that? If they were, was the cross still a source of pride for them?

I know in WWII they were issued to men not expected to survive their wounds, do you know if the same happened in the Great War?

Great cards though, I think I must have a few like that myself.

Tony

Hi,

I am always a bit weary of thinking that although it is the general opinion. "look how many EKs awarded in WW1 compared to 1870" for example... but on the other hand, look how much action there was and how many men were killed in WW1 compared to 1870.

For WW2/WW1.. large sections of the front in WW2 were on hold for most of the war, Like the Western front ans Scandinavia... whereas in WW1 most fronts were always moving in one form or another.

Adding to the comparison, in WW2 the KVK was used to reward folks and this did not exist in WW1.

In WW2 a silver wound badge received an automatic EK2, in WW1 guys who were invalided received it as well, although if this was an official order I have not been able to find out.

I once did a stat comparing how many awards were made in the different months of the war. Unfortunately I have lost it... I was surprised to see that the amounts did not change throughout the war, they were however effected by what kind of action was going on at the time. 1914 lots were awarded, early 1915 very, very few. 1916 saw the Somme and Verdun and lots of awards etc. etc....

I imagine in ate 1918 guys who had served solidly for longer periods were treated favorably when it came to deciding who gets an award, and if in 1915 only 4 men in a section had it, but in 1918 28 men in a section had it... it must be remembered that it is natural that as the war goes on, more and more men get the chance to earn one...

An interesting topic!

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:jumping: :jumping::jumping:

Hello gents !!

Merry Christmas for all and take care with chocolates !!!

Iron regards

Fkr,

:cheeky:

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ID: 15   Posted (edited)

An EK 2 is worth best wishes

and a selfbaked cake of his wife

"... sendet Dir mit einem inliegenden Kuchen

selbst gebacken i[m] Ofen von Rudis

Geburtstag unter innigsten Grüßen

u[nd] Küssen Deine treue Gretchen

Rudi u[nd] Leni"

Edited by speedytop

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I once did a stat comparing how many awards were made in the different months of the war. Unfortunately I have lost it... I was surprised to see that the amounts did not change throughout the war, they were however effected by what kind of action was going on at the time. 1914 lots were awarded, early 1915 very, very few. 1916 saw the Somme and Verdun and lots of awards etc. etc....

I imagine in ate 1918 guys who had served solidly for longer periods were treated favorably when it came to deciding who gets an award, and if in 1915 only 4 men in a section had it, but in 1918 28 men in a section had it... it must be remembered that it is natural that as the war goes on, more and more men get the chance to earn one...

An interesting topic!

The wife's grandad was awarded his after going over the top at Verdun in May 1916, he had only been at the front a few months so was no doubt very proud. He didn't get the next step up till Oct. 1918.

I'll have to search for my EKII postcards.

Tony

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Can't find any of my colourful ones but here are some early recipients.

The cyclist received his in 1914, the other is dated Jan. 1915.

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A couple of cards which look to be from the same series as the one in post 4 from Chris

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Those two cyclist photos are superb. Look at the duelling scar on the man on the right.

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ID: 24   Posted (edited)

2 Proud men with the EKII and another with a different cross worn on his right.

Tony

Edited by Tony

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2 wounded with their new crosses.

This card is signed Meyer, it's noted after the signature that Jos. Meyer, at the end on the right, was killed.

Tony

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