Wild Card

Napoleonic Era Awards Of All German States

265 posts in this topic

Any info on the 'Medal for the Lower Austrian Mobilization 1797.'

Were they given to Austrians that fought at Rivoli/Italy.

or

The Austrians who fought at the Battle of Neuwied in Austria/Germany.

thanks,

barry

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Any info on the 'Medal for the Lower Austrian Mobilization 1797.'

Were they given to Austrians that fought at Rivoli/Italy.

or

The Austrians who fought at the Battle of Neuwied in Austria/Germany.

thanks,

barry

Gentleman,

This is an excellent thread on a subject that is near and dear to my heart, namely the Napoleonic Era. Wild Card, that is a superb collection. You have some pieces that I have always wanted for my collection but either have been unable to locate them or have been outbid (by you, perhaps?!). Could you give us a listing of the literature that you find essesntial in this field of collecting? I assume that Nieman's book is one of them. Some of the pieces I wasn't aware of existing. There is not a general "Medals of the Napoleonic Era" book available to my knowledge. The Westphalian piece illustrates this point. Amazing! I did not know that it existed. I agree with one of the posters, there are probably some if not many buried for posterity in Russia.

Wild Card, if it isn't too much to ask, could you give us some hints as to where you find these pieces? Finally, I too would like to have Bear's question answered re the Austrian 1797 Medal though I think that I read it on the web somewhere.

Jaybo

P.S.- I always found it curious that the Kingdom of Saxony did not apparently issue any medals for these wars to my knowledge. Perhaps because that good old fat king was such a staunch ally of Napoleon!

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This is my latest.

Just arrived today from the UK.

HANNOVER WATERLOO MEDAL

Husar

Heinrich Wiebe

Hus. Regt. Herzog v. Cumberland

There is a interesting story behind the Cumberland Hussars and their part in the battle of Waterloo.

The whole Regiment fled the battlefield :o

At Waterloo the Cumberland Hussars were all-volunteer German unit, all young men in their first battle. Their horses were their won property (not supplied and paid by the goverment as it was the case with the French, British and KGL cavalry.) Their officers were as inexperienced as they. The colonel of the regiment was Oberst von Hake.

The Cumberland hussars remained under the heavy artillery fire for a very long time. Unfortunately it had not occured to their inexperienced officers that they could reduce casualties by having their men dismount. When the entire British and KGL cavalry had dismounted and taken shelter under their horses, (for example the British 7th Hussars dismounted in order to offer a less conspicious target, and had been moved back and forth several times. Then they took cover in the sunken lane, but not even this was safe. One of their officers wrote "... enemy's guns having exactly got their range and doing great execution.") the Cumberland hussars were sitting motionless in their saddles. The British and KGL officers wondered in amazement what was wrong with the hussars, allowing themselves to be slaughtered like that. The hussars finally began showing very visible signs of wavering and Lord Uxbridge sent an officer to see what was going on. The regiment began withdrawing but a number of officers and privates outraged by the cowardice of their comrades, left their ranks and attached themselves to other regiments. The rest of the regiment left the battlefield and galloped all the way to Brussels without participating in one single action !

Oberst von Hake was put before a court martial and was sentenced to death, but the verdict was later converted by the King to a life-long house arrest at von Hake`s estate !!!

Here are the casualty numbers for the Regiment after Wiilliam Siborne:

- 1 Officer, 2 NCO and 15 Men killed

- 3 NCO and 30 Men wounded

- 2 Men missing

Nice story or?

I would like to know, if Oberst v. Hake was also awarded a Waterloo Medal and if Heinrich Wiebe was one of the few who remained at the battlefield!!!

greetings

eitze

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Jaybo, I apologize for not responding to your compliments and questions earlier. Unfortunately when I have the opportunity to log on to GMIC, I seldom get beyond the Imperial German section.

With regard to literature regarding German Napoleonic Era decorations, the best single sources that I am aware of have to be the four volume work ?Deutsche Orden und Ehrenzeichen? by J?rg Nimmergut and ?Die Tragbaren Ehrenzeichen Des Deutschen Reiches? by Hessenthal and Schreiber. Aside from them, there are numerous books dedicated to particular states which provide various levels of information.

Where have I found these pieces? Well, I can only say that over a period of thirty years of collecting, I have covered a lot of territory - fellow collectors, dealers, auctions... no single source.

I really do not have any knowledge with regard to the Austrian 1797 medal. I will say though that in looking at the index of Hessenthal/Schreiber there are several Austrian decorations of this era.

Finally, your correct in saying that the kingdom of Saxony did not issue any campaign medals during this era (that concept, for them, began in 1849); but starting in 1796, they did issue gold and silver military merit medals under the Military Merit Order of Saint Henry. Also starting in 1815, gold and silver medals of the Civil Merit Order awarded. Shown below is a silver military merit medal from the Military Merit Order of Saint Henry of the type awarded from 1812 to 1840.

I hope that I have answered some of your questions and again apologize for this late response.

Best wishes,

Wild Card

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Eitze, That is a beautiful Hannover Waterloo that you have there, very possibly with it?s original clip and ring which is not often found. It retains excellent highlight detail; and it is also nice to see an, even if not original, proper ribbon with it as well. :love:

Thank you for passing on the story of the Hus. Regt. Herzog v. Cumberland. Though not exactly the heroes of the day, they certainly earned themselves a place in history. :shame:

Oh, one last thing, is your medal marked to Wyon? I can not tell from the picture.

Best wishes,

Wild Card

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Wow!! :speechless1:

I thought the Cumberland Hussars were denied medals. That's a first! Excellent stuff.

The other medal on eBay went to a chap on the extreme right of the Allied line. Today where the battalion stood is a cul de sac with row houses in Braine L' Allud (sp)?

Bravo!!

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@Wild Card

I am not sure if the ring is a original one.

Unfortunately I can`t say anything about the marker`s mark yet - the medal was placed to my bank safe this morning. Next time at the bank I will check it.

@Ulsterman

There was another medal to the regiment sold in 2007 by DNW: Trompeter (= trumpeter) Joh. Duvenbostel.

greetings

eitze

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Reverse.

Hello Wild Card,

Thanks for your reply. I do have an example of the Silver Military Merit Medal of the Order of St. Henry. Alas, it is of the Wilhelmine period, not 1815.

All the best,

Jaybo

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I thought the Cumberland Hussars were denied medals. That's a first! Excellent stuff.<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I seem to remember seeing that somewhere as well.

At the same time, there was a Hannoverian Waterloo medal named to Rittm. Carl von Bremer in a Thies auction back in 1991 and I have seen a few others around over the years. Another one that I have a record of was awarded to Hussar Heinrich Stroeber. So, it would seem that they were indeed awarded to this regiment nevertheless.

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Hmmmm...research project.

I'll wager there's stuff in the Hanover archives. Hofschorer might be able to help. It would be VERY interesting to see if medals were given to individuals who attached themselves to Allied units. There's mention of a few hussars being with the remnants of the Household Brigade (2-3 squadrons strong) at dusk.

Oh to have a Hanoverian roll call.

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...medals were given to individuals who attached themselves to Allied units.

That certainly makes sense.

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:jumping::cheers:

Now to get a ribbon!

Here it is :D

New, but it is a ribbon !

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And here a Prussia "Kriegsdenkm?nze" for 1814.

greetings

eitze

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sweet!! :cheers:

Perhaps from "ordensammler"? :unsure:

There is a wonderful 1st person account by a Parisian medical student in 1815 of the Allies parading through Paris after Waterloo. He mentions the Prussians wearing their campaign medals.

There are also accounts of them being worn on the field at Ligny and Waterloo. Some have been found there.

I always wonder if it "was there".

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And here a Prussia "Kriegsdenkm?nze" for 1814.

greetings

eitze

And here is the noncombatant version of your medal.

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@Wild Card

Is there a German medal you didn`t have in your possession ;)

After finally getting ribbons, I can show you my latest Brunswick Waterloo medals.

Carl Zelle, 2. Lin Bat.

This is a interesting one - no suspension, but a drill-hole :speechless1:

Casualties at Waterloo after Siborne:

- 1 Officer and 2 NCO/Men killed

- 1 Officer and 6 NCO/Men wounded

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And the second one.

Christ. P. Fricke 3. Iaeg. Bat.

Casualties at Waterloo after Siborne:

- 1 Officer and 35 NCO/Men killed

- 5 Officer and 75 NCO/Men wounded

greetings

eitze

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3rd Jagers!!!!!! :Cat-Scratch::speechless1:

THAT is magnificent!!! Oh to have talked to Jager Fricke!!

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The Prussian awards are a fascinating set that can still be found without breaking the bank. The Combatant's Medals with sharp arms - 1813, 1814, 1813/1814 and 1815:

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The version with round arms - 1813, 1814 and 1813/1814 (No 1815 in this type) - along with the 1863 Commemorative medal for combatants.

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Finally, the non-combatant medals - 1813, 1814, 1813/1814, 1815 and the 1863 commemorative.

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Hello Beau,

that is a nice collection and specially the pieces with old ribbon :love:

Most offered medal came without any.

greetings

eitze

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This just showed up (my cosolation prize for missing OMSA). Nothing super rare but, a nice 1860's era mounting.

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