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Op Telic Casualties & Fatalities

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The total number of UK troops killed in operations in Iraq has risen to 133 after a soldier died a day after coming under attack while on patrol in Basra.

A soldier with the 2nd Battalion The Rifles - formerly 1st Battalion Royal Green Jackets - died in hospital on 28 February, a day after being injured in a "small arms fire attack" in Basra.

The MoD said he had been part of a routine patrol in the al-Maqil district of the city.

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Rifleman Daniel Coffey of the 2nd Battalion The Rifles - formerly 1st Battalion Royal Green Jackets - died in hospital on 28 February, a day after being injured in an attack in Basra.

The 21-year-old was returning to his base after taking part in a task mentoring the Iraqi Police Service, when his patrol was ambushed by two gunmen.

Lt Col Justin Maciejewski, commanding officer 2nd Battalion, the Rifles said: "As the first soldier of the Rifles to be killed in action, Rifleman Coffey occupies a unique place in our Regimental story. In death he is a shining example."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6406271.stm

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Private Johnathon Wysoczan from 4 Platoon, B Company, First Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, died in the UK on 4 March after being critically injured on patrol in Iraq.

Pte Wysoczan, 21, from Biddulph, Stoke-on-Trent, was wounded after being hit by a single round in south Basra.

Major Dominic Rutherford said: "He was a very confident soldier, indeed the very first time I met him he jumped in before I could call him by his name and told me how to pronounce it or to call him A-Z as it was easier."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6421453.stm

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Kingsman Danny Wilson, from Chindit Company, 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, died on 1 April after being wounded while on patrol in the al-Ashar area of Basra.

Kingsman Wilson, from Workington, Cumbria, was wounded as he checked the roadside ahead for explosive devices. He leaves behind a wife and son.

His commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Mark Kenyon MBE, said: "Selfless, committed and always ready to look on the bright side, he will be sorely missed."

Soldier dies after Iraq shooting

A British soldier has died after being wounded in southern Iraq, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) has said.

The soldier, from Chindit Company, 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, had been injured while on patrol in the al-Ashar area of Basra.

An MoD spokeswoman said the soldier died as a result of gunshot wounds. The soldier's family has been informed.

The number of British troops killed so far in operations in Iraq has now risen to 135.

Evacuated

Major David Gell, military spokesman in Basra, said: "We can confirm that a British soldier was shot while on patrol.

"He was evacuated to Basra Palace, but subsequently died of his injuries.

"He would have been stabilised by a team medic and evacuated straight away, but unfortunately the injuries the soldier sustained were not survivable.

"Our thoughts are with his family and friends at this difficult time."

Private Johnathon Wysoczan, 21, from The Staffordshire Regiment, was the last to die on 4 March after being critically injured on patrol in Basra.

In February the government said troop numbers would be cut from 7,100 to 5,500 this year.

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A British soldier died on 2 April after he was wounded during a routine patrol in Basra in southern Iraq.

The Ministry of Defence said the serviceman, who has not been named yet, was injured in the al-Ashar district.

He was taken to Basra Palace for treatment before being flown by helicopter to a field hospital at Basra Air Station.

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Rifleman Aaron Lincoln, from the 2nd Battalion, The Rifles, died on 2 April after he was wounded by small arms fire during a routine patrol in Basra in southern Iraq.

The Ministry of Defence said the serviceman was injured in the al-Ashar district.

He was taken to Basra Palace for treatment before being flown by helicopter to a field hospital at Basra Air Station but died later of his injuries.

UK soldier dies after Iraq patrol

A British soldier has died after being wounded during a routine patrol in southern Iraq.

The soldier, from the 2nd Battalion, The Rifles, was injured in the al-Asher district of Basra at about 1400 BST.

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) said his family had been informed. His name is expected to be released on Tuesday.

A second serviceman was also wounded in the incident, which came a day after another UK soldier died following an attack on his patrol in the same area.

The MoD said the serviceman in Monday's incident was taken to Basra Palace for treatment, before being flown by helicopter to a field hospital at Basra Air Station.

Major David Gell, British military spokesman in Basra, said the second wounded soldier was expected to make a full recovery.

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Four British soldiers were killed by a roadside explosion near Basra on 5 April.

A civilian translator is also reported to have been killed in the bomb blast, which targeted a Warrior patrol. A fifth soldier was also "very seriously injured" in the incident.

Four British soldiers have been killed by a roadside bomb near Basra, southern Iraq, the Ministry of Defence has confirmed.

A civilian translator was also killed in the bomb blast, which targeted a patrol in a Warrior armoured vehicle.

A fifth soldier was also "very seriously injured" and is being treated in the military hospital in Basra.

This latest incident brings the total number of UK troops killed in operations in Iraq to 140.

The MoD said next of kin were being informed and no further details would be released until that process was complete.

Continuing attacks

According to the MoD, the incident happened in the early hours of Thursday.

The Warrior armoured personnel carrier first came under attack near the centre of town and continued on its way.

However, on a stretch of highway in the Hayaniyah district on the north-western outskirts of Basra it was hit by a massive bomb explosion which wrecked the vehicle and left a huge crater.

The soldiers were all inside the vehicle when they died.

After the bomb explosion British forces in the area came under attack from small arms fire and rocket-propelled grenades, and they fired back.

Iraqi police said the British forces attacked a nearby police checkpoint and detained and disarmed those manning it.

The BBC's Jim Muir in Baghdad said the area where the incidents took place is believed to be a hotbed of support for the radical Shi'ite militia lead by the cleric Moqtada Sadr.

Prime Minister Tony Blair contrasted the safe return of 15 British sailors and marines held captive in Iran with the soldiers' deaths.

He said: "Just as we rejoice at the return of our 15 personnel, so today we also grieve and mourn for the loss of our soldiers in Basra who were killed as a result of a terrorist act."

Defence secretary Des Browne said his thoughts were with the families of the deceased.

He added that their deaths were a sobering reminder of the "difficult job that we ask our people to do in Iraq and elsewhere, and how well and how bravely they carry this out".

Further deaths

Two other British soldiers were also killed in Iraq this week, also while on patrol in the Basra area.

The bodies of 18-year-old Rifleman Aaron Lincoln, from the 2nd Battalion, The Rifles, and Kingsman Danny Wilson, 28, from Chindit Company, 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, have been flown back to RAF Lyneham in Wiltshire.

Kingsman Wilson, from Workington, Cumbria, was fatally wounded while on patrol in the al-Ashar district of Basra on 1 April. He leaves behind a wife and son.

Rifleman Aaron Lincoln, from Durham, was shot in the same area the following day.

Of those soldiers who have died in Iraq, 108 are classed as having been killed after hostile action, while 32 have died from illness, non-combat injuries or accidents, or the cause of their death is still unknown.

Meanwhile, eyewitness reports say a US helicopter has come down in Iraq after apparently coming under heavy fire from insurgents.

The reports say the helicopter came under attack near Latifiya, 40km (25 miles) south of the capital, Baghdad.

No information is currently available on any casualties and the US military says it is investigating.

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Second Lieutenant Joanna Yorke Dyer. (pictured)

Corporal Kris O'Neill, Private Eleanor Dlugsoz and Kingsman Adam James Smith.

Killed in Iraq, April 5 2007.

Rest In Peace.

Kevin in Deva.

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Four British soldiers were killed by a roadside explosion near Basra on 5 April.

They were named as: Second Lieutenant Joanna Yorke Dyer from the Intelligence Corps attached to the 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment; Corporal Kris O'Neill and Private Eleanor Dlugosz from the Royal Army Medical Corps; and Kingsman Adam James Smith from 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment.

A civilian translator also died in the bomb blast, which targeted a Warrior patrol. A fifth soldier was "very seriously injured".

Tributes have been paid by families and colleagues of four British soldiers killed by a roadside bomb near Basra, southern Iraq.

The blast targeted the vehicle of 2nd Lt Joanna Yorke Dyer, Cpl Kris O'Neill, Pte Eleanor Dlugosz and Kingsman Adam James Smith.

A civilian Kuwaiti translator was also killed in the blast, while a fifth soldier was "very seriously injured".

The injured soldier is being treated in the military hospital in Basra.

Second Lt Yorke Dyer was from the Intelligence Corps attached to the 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment and Kingsman Smith was from 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment.

Cpl O'Neill and Pte Dlugosz were both from the Royal Army Medical Corps.

According to the MoD, the incident happened in the early hours of Thursday as the troops returned from patrol duty.

Their vehicle first came under attack near the centre of Basra and continued on its way.

However, on a stretch of highway in the Hayaniyah district on the north-western outskirts of Basra it was hit by a massive bomb explosion which wrecked the vehicle and left a three-foot crater.

The soldiers were all on patrol in a Warrior armoured vehicle when they died.

This latest incident brings the total number of UK troops killed in operations in Iraq to 140.

Four British servicewomen have now died in action in Iraq, while the death of a fifth was not thought to be combat-related.

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Medical Corps Private Eleanor Dlugosz, 19 , from Southampton, was mourned yesterday as a caring girl devoted to helping others before herself.

Private Dlugosz, known as Ella or DZ to her comrades, was providing medical support to the patrol. Her commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Martin Toney, said: "DZ was one of those soldiers who, despite a degree of shyness and a natural reticence, always surprised with her guts and determination."

The other soldiers who died were named as Corporal Kris O'Neill, 27, from the Royal Army Medical Corps, and Kingsman Adam Smith, 19. A Kuwaiti interpreter was also killed in the blast, which left a fifth British soldier seriously wounded.

Pte Dlugosz was based in Catterick in Yorkshire, but grew up in Southampton.

Her friend and colleague, Pte Stella Lee, said: "Ella was a caring girl who enjoyed being a medic. Helping others before herself was who she was. She brightened up everybody's day with her cheesy smile. She was a privilege to work with and know and she will always be in our hearts."

Kingsman Adam James Smith, from the Isle of Man, was serving with the Duke of Lancaster's Regiment and had been in Basra since November. Comrades described him as dependable, cheerful and courageous. He entered the Army in 2004 and joined the reconnaissance platoon of the regiment's 2nd Battalion last year.

Medical Corps Corporal Kris O'Neill, was a father of two who had been in Basra only since January.

The 27-year-old lived in Catterick with his wife, Tina and three-year-old twins Adam and Conner and was described as a devoted family man.

His friend and colleague Cpl Martin Blaker-Hood said: "Kris was pleasant, hard-working and very well respected. He loved his family and was a really good bloke. His death is a big loss."

Colonel Toney said: "Cpl O'Neill was a reflective and utterly dependable soldier who used his maturity and common sense to great effect, becoming the squadron's 'safe pair of hands'.

"He would turn his hand to all sorts of things, including helping to rebuild Iraq by training the police service, and was a key player in the unit.

"My thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends, especially his wife and children, at this hugely difficult time."

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The total number of UK troops killed in operations in Iraq has risen to 142 after the death of two military personnel in an apparent mid-air collision between two UK helicopters.

Of those who died, 108 are classed as having been killed after hostile action, while 34 have died from illness, non-combat injuries or accidents, or the cause of their death is still unknown.

Two military personnel were killed when two Puma helicopters crashed in an apparent mid-air collision in a rural area near Taji, north of Baghdad.

Defence Secretary Des Browne said initial reports suggested the crash on 15 April was an accident and not caused by an insurgent attack.

Two die as UK helicopters crash

Pumas are used for transporting troops and equipment

Two British helicopters have crashed in Iraq, killing two military personnel and seriously injuring another.

The Ministry of Defence said both of the Puma helicopters were from RAF Benson in Oxfordshire.

Defence Secretary Des Browne said one of those killed was from the RAF and the other from the Army. Four other personnel were injured, one seriously.

Speaking outside the MoD, he said reports suggested the crash, north of Baghdad, was an accident.

"There will of course be an investigation into the precise cause of this incident, but I should stress that Puma helicopters have a very good safety record," he said.

Wounded discharged

The Puma helicopters came down in the early hours of Sunday in a rural area near Taji, site of a large US base. US forces had secured the crash site, Mr Browne said.

Two of the four injured had already been discharged and had returned to their units. The other two injured remain in a US military hospital - one remains in a "very serious" condition.

Mr Browne said: "Back here in the UK our focus is of course in supporting the families of those killed or injured in this incident. Our thoughts are with them at this very difficult time."

The BBC understands the helicopters had been taking part in a special forces mission.

Initial reports indicate that the crash was an accident and was not a result of an attack by insurgents

Defence Secretary Des Browne

Puma helicopters

Puma helicopters - mainly used to transport troops and equipment - are normally flown by the RAF.

However a Ministry of Defence spokesman would not confirm which regiment the dead personnel belonged to.

Earlier reports had incorrectly identified the crashed helicopters as American.

Prime Minister Tony Blair said it was a "terrible time" for the families of the two UK service personnel who had died, but insisted British foreign policy was "justified and right".

Retired Wing Commander Andrew Brooks told BBC News 24 that Pumas had been in service for around 30 years and were getting elderly.

The military had to use them in Iraq, he said, because the roads were not safe.

Further fighting

The two deaths bring the total number of British fatalities since the 2003 invasion of Iraq to 142.

Meanwhile, British troops have been involved in more fighting with a Shia militia group in the southern Iraqi city of Basra.

Five gunmen from the Mehdi army militia are thought to have been killed in an exchange of fire.

It follows an incident on Friday night when British forces killed eight members of the militia as they were apparently laying mines.

The incident was in the same area where a British Warrior armoured vehicle was hit by a roadside bomb eleven days ago, killing four troops and their Iraqi interpreter.

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Two military personnel were killed when two Puma helicopters crashed in an apparent mid-air collision in a rural area near Taji, north of Baghdad.

One has been named as Colour Sergeant Mark Powell, 37, of the Parachute Regiment, described by the Ministry of Defence as "an exemplary soldier, father, husband, friend and Briton".

The other, an RAF airman, has not been named yet.

Defence Secretary Des Browne said initial reports suggested the crash on 15 April was an accident and not caused by an insurgent attack.

One of the servicemen who died when two helicopters crashed in Iraq on Sunday has been named as Colour Sergeant Mark Powell of the Parachute Regiment.

The family of the other man who died in the crash, an RAF airman, has asked for more time before his name is released.

The Ministry of Defence said Colour Sergeant Powell, 37, originally from south Wales, was "an exemplary soldier, father, husband, friend and Briton".

He lived in Hereford with his architect wife and their six-month-old baby.

Colour Sergeant Powell, a keen surfer, joined the Parachute Regiment in 1990.

His friends in Porthcawl, where he grew up, described him as "an awesome, unassuming, lovely bloke".

Simon Tucker, who runs the local surf academy, added that his death had come as "a shock to everyone".

In a statement the Ministry of Defence said: "Colour Sergeant Mark Powell was an exemplary combat leader, soldier, father, husband, friend and Briton; dedicated to his family, his men, his mission and his country.

"In the finest traditions of the Army and his regiment - he was utterly selfless, never shirking danger, effort or hard service in the pursuit of his mission.

"His loss is tragic, and keenly felt by all but his example to others will be sure to endure and inspire us all for years to come. Our thoughts now are with his family and his comrades."

Both of the Puma helicopters involved in the crash were from RAF Benson in Oxfordshire.

Defence Secretary Des Browne said on Sunday that reports suggested the crash, north of Baghdad, was an accident.

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RAF Sergeant Mark McLaren, 27, from Northumberland, was said by his commanding officer to be a "consummate" professional by his commanding officer.

Defence Secretary Des Browne said initial reports suggested the crash on 15 April was an accident and not caused by an insurgent attack.

Iraq air crash serviceman named

Sgt McLaren was a master of his trade, colleagues said

A British serviceman killed after a mid-air crash between two UK helicopters in Iraq has been named as Royal Air Force Sergeant Mark McLaren.

The 27-year-old, from Northumberland, was described as a "consummate" professional by his commanding officer, Wing Commander Chris Hunter.

Sgt McLaren died with Colour Sergeant Mark Powell, of the Parachute regiment, on Sunday.

Defence Secretary Des Browne said reports suggested it was an accident.

Father-of-two Sgt McLaren, was described as having had a "bright future" ahead of him.

'Positive attitude'

He had previously graduated from the Air Loadmaster Specialist Training Course at RAF Shawbury.

Wing Cdr Hunter, Officer Commanding 230 Squadron RAF Aldergrove, described Sgt McLaren as someone who "loved life" and who was a caring husband and father of two sons.

He said: "Sgt McLaren had a positive attitude towards everything he did and a level of self-motivation that was second to none.

"As an Air Loadmaster he was the master of his trade, a consummate professional and committed team player.

"When flying on operations in either the UK or Iraq he always performed at the top of his game and it was a pleasure to fly with him when you were crewed up together."

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Two soldiers from the Catterick-based Queen's Royal Lancers were killed after being caught up in an explosion while on a routine patrol in Maysan Province on 19 April.

Three further soldiers were injured - one seriously - in the incident.

Corporal Ben Leaning, 24, from S######horpe, known as Bill to his friends, was described by the Ministry of Defence as a "fine soldier and a natural leader" who became a crew commander before going to Iraq last autumn.

Trooper Kristen Turton, 27, from Grimsby, who joined The Queen's Royal Lancers in 2003 and became a trained sharp shooter, was described by his commanding officer as an "exceptional soldier".

Last Updated: Friday, 20 April 2007, 17:11 GMT 18:11 UK

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UK soldiers killed in Iraq named

Cpl Ben Leaning and Tpr Kristen Turton died while on patrol

Two British soldiers killed in south-eastern Iraq have been named as Corporal Ben Leaning and Trooper Kristen Turton.

The soldiers, from the Catterick-based Queen's Royal Lancers, were on a routine patrol in Maysan Province when they were caught in an explosion.

Cpl Leaning, 24, from S######horpe, and Tpr Turton, 27, from Grimsby, were in a Scimitar tank when the blast happened.

Three further soldiers were injured in the incident - one seriously.

The injured Scimitar's gunner and two other members of the troop were taken by helicopter to Tallil airbase in Dhi Qar Province for medical treatment.

They were patrolling at 1120 local time (0820 BST) on Thursday when the explosion occurred.

Cpl Leaning, known as Bill to his friends, joined the Army in 1999 and served in Oman and Kosovo as well as Iraq in 2003.

'Devastated'

Described as a "fine soldier and a natural leader", he progressed quickly through the ranks and became a crew commander and a signals instructor before going to Iraq last autumn.

In a statement, his family said they were "devastated by the loss" and described Cpl Leaning as "a loving son and great friend".

Major Charlie Ball, of The Queen's Royal Lancers, said Cpl Leaning had a "huge sense of fun".

"His mischievous smile shone through even under the most trying circumstances and he was an inspiration to his crew and the squadron as a whole," he said.

Tpr Turton joined The Queen's Royal Lancers in 2003 and became a trained sharp-shooter and specialised in demolitions.

His wife Sharon, whom he married in 2004, described him as the "most amazing person" she had ever met.

"I am proud he has died doing something he loved so much," she said.

His commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Richard Nixon-Eckersall, said he was an "exceptional soldier".

"Selfless and committed he strived for perfection in everything he did," he added.

Handover

Secretary of State for Defence Des Browne said his thoughts were with the families of the two men.

He added: "These young men died serving our country and helping to bring peace to Iraq. They will be deeply missed."

The two soldiers were killed a day after Iraqi authorities took over control of security enforcement in Maysan Province where their regiment is currently nearing the end of a six-month tour.

British forces withdrew from a permanent base in Maysan last August, but have continued to work at improving border security in the province.

The two deaths bring the total number of UK troops killed in operations in Iraq to 144.

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A soldier from the 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment has been killed while out on patrol in the Al Ashar district of central Basra, southern Iraq on Monday 23 April.

He was providing protection for a Warrior armoured vehicle when he was killed by small arms fire.

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A British soldier killed while on patrol in southern Iraq has been named as Kingsman Alan Joseph Jones by the Ministry of Defence.

Kingsman Jones, 20, from the 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, was patrolling in the Al Ashar district of central Basra.

He was providing protection for a Warrior armoured vehicle when he was killed by small arms fire on Monday.

The gunner, from Liverpool, was described as "cheerful and likeable".

Everton fan

Kingsman Jones was evacuated to Basra Palace but later died of his injuries.

He joined the Army in 2003 and was deployed to Iraq in November 2006.

A staunch Everton fan and keen footballer, Kingsman Jones leaves behind his mother, Julie, younger brother, Reese, and girlfriend Lauren.

He was the epitome of all a Kingsman should be

Lt Col Mark Kenyon

His commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Mark Kenyon, said he would be remembered as a "professional soldier who was loyal to his regiment and his friends".

"Above all he was a cheerful and likeable young man who always had time to help others," he said.

"He was the epitome of all a Kingsman should be."

Defence Secretary Des Browne said Kingsman Jones' family, friends and fellow soldiers were in his thoughts.

"I know he will be sorely missed," he said.

The death of Kingsman Jones brings the number of UK troops killed in operations in Iraq to 145.

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A soldier from the 2nd Battalion The Rifles has been killed while out on patrol in the Al Ashar district of central Basra on Sunday, 29 April.

He was dismounted from his vehicle and had been carrying out routine checks at the time of the incident, which involved small arms fire.

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Rifleman Paul Donnachie, 18, known as Donny to his friends, was killed while on a routine patrol in Basra, southern Iraq.

He was shot dead after dismounting from his vehicle in the Al Ashar district on 29 April.

The soldier, from Reading, was from the 2nd Battalion The Rifles.

A British soldier killed while on a routine patrol in Basra, southern Iraq, has been named by the Ministry of Defence as Rifleman Paul Donnachie.

The 18-year-old from Reading was shot dead after dismounting from his vehicle in the Al Ashar district.

The soldier was from the 2nd Battalion The Rifles. He was killed on Sunday.

He is the 12th British soldier to die in Iraq this month - the highest monthly casualty figure since the invasion four years ago.

Major Alex Baring, his company commander, said: "Rifleman Donnachie, or 'Donny' as he was known to his mates, was the epitome of what it is to be professional.

"Out here in Basra City, he was one of those rare sorts that never complained whatever he was told to do, in fact he used to volunteer to go out on patrols.

"He never wanted to be away from where the action was. For an 18-year-old that's pretty impressive."

Major David Gell, a British army spokesman in Basra, said the patrol had been travelling in a Bulldog Army vehicle, but had to dismount to carry out checks as they moved through the town.

He said: "It was an opportunist small arms fire attack. They are not uncommon in Basra or indeed across the province as a whole so we are not looking at it as a new threat.

"We are committed to enhancing the security of the region, supporting the Iraqi Security Forces (ISF).

"An incident like this, tragic as it is, will make us pull together and recognise that we have a job to do out here."

The latest death brings the total number of UK troops killed in operations in Iraq to 146, which includes 112 killed as a result of hostile action.

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A British soldier who died in Iraq after a traffic accident has been named as Major Nick Bateson of the Corps of Royal Signals.

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/pressass/20070502...ed-6323e80.html

Major Bateson, 49, from Chislehurst in Kent, who was married, was killed in a road traffic accident in Basra in the south of the country on Tuesday.

The keen sportsman was riding his bike on the Contingency Operating Base at Basra Air Station when he was involved in an accident with a coach. The soldier was taken to the field hospital by ambulance but sadly died of his injuries.

He had been working at the headquarters of Multi-National Division (South East) for the last three months, where his role was to support communications between the UK and British forces in Iraq.

He was on detachment from the Defence Information Infrastructure Integrated Project Team, based in Corsham, Devon.

Major Bateson had represented the Army in the triathlon and orienteering and competed in swimming, cross country, and cycling at the highest levels of service competition.

He is survived by his wife Angela, the Ministry of Defence said.

Major Bateson's death is the 147th fatality the British military has suffered since the beginning of hostilities in Iraq four years ago.

It is the first fatality in May and comes after one of the bloodiest months ever for the British military in Iraq, during which 12 service personnel were killed.

The Ministry of Defence said he was riding a bike when it was involved in an accident with a coach transporting troops around the base. A full investigation is to be undertaken into the accident, an MoD spokesman said.

- - - - - END OF ARTICLE - - - -

May he Rest In Peace

Kevin in Deva :beer:

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Major Nick Bateson, 49, of the Core of Royal Signals died in a cycling accident at Basra Air Station on 1 May.

The Kent-born officer, who leaves a wife, was on detachment in Iraq from his role at the Defence Information Infrastructure Integrated Project Team in Devon.

His commanding officer said Maj Bateson was known for his professionalism and commitment to his job and love of sport.

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Pte Kevin Thompson, aged 21, from the Royal Logistic Corps, died on 6 May from injuries sustained when the convoy in which he was travelling was hit by an improvised bomb.

After the attack on 3 May, he was treated at the field hospital in Basra Air Station before being flown back to Britain, where he died.

A British soldier who died from injuries sustained last week in Iraq has been named.

He was Lancaster-born Pte Kevin Thompson, 21, from the Royal Logistic Corps, the Ministry of Defence said.

Pte Thompson was wounded on Thursday when a routine convoy to re-supply the Basra Palace military base was hit by an improvised explosive device.

His death on Sunday brought the total number of UK troops killed in operations in Iraq to 148.

'Best friend'

Pte Thompson is survived by his mother Teresa, father Mark, brother Andrew, sisters Nicola and Jade and fianc?e Lucy.

After being given first aid at the scene he was treated at the field hospital at Basra Air Station, and then flown back to Selly Oak hospital in Birmingham.

He was expected to recover but his condition deteriorated and his family were at his bedside when he died.

Born in Lancaster and nicknamed "Tomo", Pte Thompson was described as a keen footballer and supporter of Birmingham City FC.

'Genuine loyalty'

His Squadron Commander in Iraq, Major John Wallace-Dutton, said: "He was a soldier who people liked to be around.

"Everyone enjoyed his humour and respected him for his genuine loyalty and love for his family. He was a brave man and an inspiration to the men he served with."

He joined the army in 2004 and was a member of The Carmen's Troop, serving in Iraq under the command of 19 Combat Service Support Battalion.

Pte Thompson's friend Pte Robert Etherington described him as a "one-off".

"He was my best friend and I will miss him terribly like us all serving with Carmen's Troop. He will never be forgotten," Pte Etherington added.

Defence Secretary Des Browne said: "My thoughts and sympathies are with Private Thompson's family at this difficult

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Corporal Jeremy Brookes, of 4th Battalion The Rifles, died after the convoy he was travelling in came under attack in southern Iraq.

Cpl Brookes died of his injuries after the attack (Pic MoD)

The soldier had been commanding a vehicle escorting a re-supply convoy in the Al Tuwaysa district of the city when it came under attack.

The 28-year-old was taken to the Basra Palace UK base, but died of injuries sustained in the small arms fire attack.

Cpl Brookes, originally of Birmingham, was remembered as an "inspirational" figure by his commanding officer.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6678533.stm

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A soldier from A Company, 4th Battalion The Rifles died after a patrol came under fire in the Al Atiyah district, north west of Basra City on 7 June.

He was evacuated by helicopter to the field hospital at the British base in Basra Air Station but died from his injuries.

A British soldier has been killed in Iraq - the 150th member of the UK armed forces to die in the country since the 2003 invasion.

The soldier was from A Company, 4th Battalion The Rifles, the Ministry of Defence has confirmed.

He was part of a patrol conducting a search and detention operation.

After being shot by small arms fire, he was flown by helicopter to the field hospital in the British base at Basra Air Station but died from his injuries.

'Heart goes out'

Three other coalition troops were injured as a result of the battle, which took place at 0220 local time (1120 BST) in the Al Atiyah district, north west of Basra City on Thursday, but their condition is not thought to be life-threatening.

The previous British soldier to be killed in Iraq was Corporal Jeremy Brookes, also of 4th Battalion The Rifles.

He died of his injuries after the convoy he was travelling in came under attack in southern Iraq on 21 May.

The soldier had been commanding a vehicle escorting a re-supply convoy in the Al Tuwaysa district of the city.

Rose Gentle, whose son Fusilier Gordon Gentle was killed in June 2004, said she felt "sick" to learn UK deaths in Iraq had reached 150.

She said: "I think Gordon Brown should be thinking 'This is the time, this is it, bring them home'.

"My heart goes out to the mother. I know the hurt and the pain that she is going through. We are thinking of her."

Reg Keys, father of Tom, one of six Red Caps killed by an angry Iraqi mob in October 2003, added: "It's a milestone and I would like to know what the strategy is now, what the objective for those remaining troops to achieve in Iraq."

"It just goes on, this steady trickle of flag-bearing coffins coming home."

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Cpl Rodney Wilson of A Company, 4th Battalion The Rifles, was killed trying to rescue a colleague under heavy fire.

Cpl Rodney Wilson was killed by small arms fire

His commanding officer said it was a "supremely selfless act".

Cpl Wilson, 30, had been taking part in a mission to detain insurgents in the Al Atiyah district, north west of Basra City on 7 June.

He was evacuated by helicopter to the field hospital at the British base in Basra Air Station but died from his injuries.

Tributes to 'selfless' UK soldier

Cpl Rodney Wilson was killed by small arms fire

The 150th member of the British military to die in Iraq was carrying out a "supremely selfless act" when he was shot, his commanding officer said.

Cpl Rodney Wilson, 30, from A Company, 4th Battalion The Rifles, was killed as he rescued a wounded colleague in heavy fire on Thursday.

His fiancee Michelle said: "I loved him deeply. I miss him. A huge part of my life has been taken away."

He died during a mission to detain insurgents, the MoD said.

Three other coalition troops were hurt in the operation in Basra's Al Atiyah area but none sustained life threatening injuries, the MoD added.

After being shot, Cpl Wilson, who was born in Germany, was flown by helicopter to the field hospital in the British base at Basra Air Station but died from his injuries at 0220 local time (2320 BST).

Weapons cache

The Rifles are operating in Iraq as part of 1st Mechanised Brigade and the operation resulted in the brigade uncovering the largest weapons cache it has found to date.

Five suspected insurgents were also detained.

Cpl Rodney Wilson was a natural leader, his officers said

Cpl Wilson, based at Bulford Camp, Wiltshire, served as a section commander in the Rifles and was awarded a distinction in the Platoon Sergeant's Battle Course - placing him in the top 2% of infantry soldiers.

He leaves a fiancee as well as his family, friends and dog Missy.

His commanding officer, Lt Col Patrick Sanders, described him as a "charismatic and inspiring" figure who led his men by example and gave up his life for a colleague.

Referring to the way Cpl Wilson died, he said: "It was a supremely selfless and brave act - he would not have thought twice - and he gave his life that one of his beloved riflemen might live.

"He had that rare gift of natural leadership that comes to only a few; clarity of thought, crisp and sure-footed decision-making, strength of purpose and a happy combination of a magnetic personality and absolute self-assurance that drew riflemen to him.

"Where Cpl Wilson led, others would always follow. He was, in the words of his own riflemen, 'a legend'."

'A free spirit'

He added that Cpl Wilson was also a "maverick" who loved to challenge convention and upset apple carts.

"One just had to admire him - he could charm the birds out of the trees, call black white, inflict a mischievous prank on you and have you agreeing with him and laughing all at the same time," he said.

"He was remarkable and truly unique - a free spirit - and we will all miss him terribly."

He was in every sense an impressive man

Maj Mark Wilson

Cpl Wilson's company commander, Maj Mark Wilson, described him as a joker who recently covered the inside of a colleague's helmet with shoe polish.

He was an avid rugby supporter, who loved Australia and planned to move there to join the Australian Army, he added.

"I knew Cpl Wilson, or Will as he was known to his friends, for four years and I can honestly say that he was the epitome of the thinking rifleman," he said.

"A deep-thinker, intelligent and, irritatingly, nearly always right; he was in every sense an impressive man."

He said as he had set off on the operation that would end his life, he had a look of "sheer excitement".

Cpl Wilson is the 150th member of the UK armed forces to die in Iraq since the 2003 invasion.

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Lance Corporal James Cartwright, 21, of Badger Squadron, 2 Royal Tank Regiment, died after his Warrior armoured vehicle rolled off a bridge in the As Sarraji area, south of Basra.

Lance Corporal James Cartwright was killed in a Warrior accident

His commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel David Catmur, said he was a "professional soldier" and a "renowned character".

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6761735.stm

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