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French Foreign Legion Medal Group

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Does anyone know how to obtain records of FFL soldeirs who were killed in the First World War?

This would be quite impossible since the FFL only existed during WW2

I rather doubt there would be an official list of members of the Forces Françaises Libres who were killed in action in WW2. You might like to try the Association des Français Libres. They probably have a website.

Best of luck.

Veteran

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Hello Ostprussenmann.

You may want to attempt the following website for information on military personnel who lost their lives in service with French Armed Forces:

http://www.memoiredeshommes.sga.defense.gouv.fr/

I have tested the section of those who died in WW II and found personnel listed who were serving in the French Foreign Legion on "both sides" (i.e. Vichy and Forces Francaises Libre).

BTW: this included one man who was detached as anti-aircraft crew on board of a tanker which was lost at sea. Another man who was executed in France in 1944 and listed as a member of the Forces Francaises de l'Interieur

I was not successful in regards to the section WW I because the computer system froze up on me.

Bernhard H. Holst

Edited by Bernhard H.Holst

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Ulsterman

I hope you wont mind me butting in a little.

This man apparently NEVER belonged to the FFL (Forces Françaises Libres). In fact, he was among the Legionnaires who did not stay with De Gaulle in June of 1940.

This seems to be proved by his "Vichy" ribbon to the Croix de guerre, a quite unconceaveable occurence for a Free French.

I fully agree with the group. This is an outstanding group.

Regards to all

Veteran

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Ulsterman

I hope you wont mind me butting in a little.

This man apparently NEVER belonged to the FFL (Forces Françaises Libres). In fact, he was among the Legionnaires who did not stay with De Gaulle in June of 1940.

Hi,

I think the English "French Foreign Legion" is the root of the FFL here,

Best

Chris

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An amazing group from a very illustrious career. The history and the service are immeasurable. I highly suspect that you and your family are extremely proud and honored. I hope that your grandchildren will enjoy these for generations.

I second the recommendation on writing an article to honor him.

Michael.

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Hello : correction to the website address I posted above:

http://www.memoirede...efense.gouv.fr/

But it will not accept the entire website address which is ...memoiredeshommes.sga.defense.gouv.fr/

Bernhard H. Holst

Hello readers:

I have visited this website and found with a random search several members of the French Foreign Legion who belonged to units deployed in France and lost their lives .

Some caution is advised searching in the lists of all conflicts: the results may be sometimes disappointing because of assumed names while serving, will not bring up the personnel you are looking for. Also transcription of foreign names, locales and such leave a lot to be desired. I encountered a lot of that while searching the lists of those who lost their lives in Indochina.

Bernhard H. Holst

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Chris

Thank you for your message. I can see why I got mixed up between the French historical reference to the FFL and the looser language used on this forum.

Regards

Veteran

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An update ... I decided to try and get good examples of my great-grandfathers missing medals. First up was his missing Ouissam Alaouite (Chevalier). I have been searching for one of the early versions (with text on the arms of the star) for awhile. Not easy to find. There seems to be 100 of the post-1950 versions (no text in arms) for every 1 of these early ones.

He earned this for the Rif War (he was in Marocco from 1919-1923). Not sure what he did to earn it. His resume states that there was a Dahir (Moroccan Royal Decree) that went with it but this is sadly missing too.

He was with the Mounted Company of the 4th REI from the time it was created on Nov. 15, 1920. Before that he had been with the 2nd REI at Meknes. While in Morocco he rose in rank from Legionnaire 1st Class to Brigadier (Caporal) to Farrier Sergeant to Sergeant-Major by 23 Oct. 1923. Note the cavalry ranks ... apparently because they were mounted.

It feels good to have this medal "home". I know it's not the exact one he earned but it still seems right.

Now I need to find a Medaille Colonaile with clasps Maroc and Sahara and a WWII commemorative medal with four bars (including Novege - which won't be easy).

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Here is a picture of his unit in Morocco. He is the one holding the flag. He isllabeled as "B. Hauser" ("B" for Brigadier). The other two identified individuals are "Lt. de Marion" and "S. Spangenberg". I assume the "S" is Sergeant not his first initial. At the top it says "Peloton Monte --- 4th Regiment de la Legion Etrangere" This is in the stamp. Peloton Monte is "Mounted Company". It is signed over the stamp "Souvenir du Peloton Monte -- de Marion".

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Hi!

Wonderful group you have... my Grand-father was Swiss (like me) and fought in the Foreign Legion in Indochina.

ciao,

Claudio

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Hello Claudio,

Great to hear we have a connection. Where do you live? My great-grandfather was born in Montreaux in 1898. He joined the Legion in 1914 at age 16. He was wounded on 9 May 1915 at Carncey during the 2nd Battle of Artois which was the attempt to take Hill 140 (Vimy Ridge).

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Over the holidays I discovered a previously unknown album from my Great-Grandfather. I was in the possession of my aunt. It is from his service from 1919-1923 (in Morocco). Truly some amazing stuff. I will post more as I scan them.

This one is of the Sous-Officers of the 4 REI. My GGF is on the bottom row in the middle (looking rather impish).

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This picture was loose in the album. It is from the early 30's when he was with the 2eme Tirailleurs in Mostagenem. I am not sure what C.H.R. refers to.

He is in the first row, fourth from the right.

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He titled this one "Fetes du 14 Juliet 1922" and subtitled "Revue des Troupes de Marrakech". He is somewhere in that crowd. Interesting that they are wearing the Sun Helmet.

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Absolutely fascinating group of medals, badges and pictures! Incredible family history worthy of multiple magazine articles!! Even worthy of a corner of a museum! Thank you so much for posting and sharing this treasure with us!

:jumping::o :jumping:

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Congratulation for these very remarquable family records.

You should be able to put together the awards he earned without too much trouble. Make sure the WW2 Commemorative medal is the dark bronze used for the first strickings and not the current gawdy golden stuff presently sold by the Pairs Mint. I would expect the appropriate clasps to ba available from them.

Thank you for sharing this Foreign Legion saga from the olden times.

A very Happy New Year to you

Veteran

N.B. A C.H.R. in the French Army is a "Compagnie Hors-Rang" i.e. the Regimental (or Battallion) Service Company.

Edited by Veteran

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This one shows the aftermath of a battle during the Rif War. Legionnaires are inspecting the remains of Moroccan soldiers.

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Group portrait that includes a Sergt. Moor, Capitaine Fumet, Adjudant Amette, and Sgt. Major. Drinnhausen. My GGF is in the back row on the extreme left (with the other Caporals). He is curiously wearing a white colonial tunic.

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An unknown Legionnaire and his dog in front of a Fort in Morocco 1922. The caption says "Poste de G.E.A.". Not sure what that means.

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Great stuff indeed. Always helps to have the details of the man to go with the lovely group. I can almost see him in my mind, as an old campaigner, taking his coimmission to go out and [again] defend France. Thankd very much for sharing.

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