Mervyn Mitton

SKINNER'S HORSE

68 posts in this topic

ID: 1   Posted (edited)

post-6209-029820500 1292334072_thumb.jpg


One of the British Raj's most illustrious Regiments. Skinner's Horse was also to be known as the 1st. Bengal Cavalry.

They were formed in 1803 as Captain Skinner's Corps of Irregular Cavalry. He was British - but, married to an Indian Princess. This initially barred him from joining the Honourable East India Company (HEIC). He created the unique and famous yellow uniform - which gave the nickname of The Yellow Boys. After many succesful actions against breakaway Indian principalities he was commissioned into the HEIC and given the rank of Lt. Colonel - however, he was a Brigadier at local level. He died in 1841 at 63 years of age.

The Indian Mutiny brought about many changes in the old HEIC army and both Police and Military were reformed in 1861. This was the date Skinner's became the 1st. Bengal Cavalry. Their last change of name was in 1921 when they became the 1st. Duke of York's Own Skinner's Horse.

The Indian Army took over the Regiment after Independence in 1947 and they are now a tank Regt.. Their long - and illustrious history is still carefully preserved and honoured.

I bought this beautiful porcelain hand made and handpainted figure a few weeks ago - I had planned to have it at the house, but really have no place left to show it to advantage . It is in the shop and I will envy whoever buys-it. The sword is the 1912 Officers' pattern cavalry sword - so this uniform will be for the final period 1921-1947.post-6209-029820500 1292334072_thumb.jpg

Edited by Nick

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What a lovely thing! I've always had a weakness for anything realting to the 'Yellow Boys'. In fact, I have a limited edition print painting by an artist called W E Fente: a head and shoulders portrait of a Sowar of HH against a backdrop of several galloping men and one of the frontier forts {Ali Musjid?]. I've recently sold my Indian cavalry badge collection but Skinner's Horse and Hodson's were the ones I was most tempted to keep. If I lived on the same continent, Mervyn, I'd likely have that statue off you pd.q.! :cheers:

Peter

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Yes, very nice. That turban is something!

I have a few porcelain gunners - mostly French Napoleon era, they are a nice addition to the war room.

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Sigh.... I used to own the DSO group to a commander of Skinners Horse... in Retrospect I wish I had never traded it away.... That figurine would have gone nicely with it.

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Dear Mervyn and Harry,

Nice pictures you have added. I have a soft copy of a book named- Skinner's Horse. If you want it, just PM me. I'll send you the download link

Regards

Shams

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Thankyou Shams - please give us the link - should make interesting reading. I often see you making enquiries - but, it would be nice to know a little about you ? Where you live, your family, your work and your collecting interests ? Mervyn

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ID: 14   Posted (edited)

Thank you Mervyn. The link is-

Skinner's Horse (Plz click to download).

One thing I want to mention. I got this link from one of my forum friend named mconrad. He should get special thanks for such a nice book. You will enjoy the book.

I am Bangladeshi. In profession, I am a Lecturer of an university of Bangladesh. I am graduate in Computer Engineering. I am looking for PhD in USA, Canada. My hobby on British army uniforms specially tunic, collar and cuff design. I have collected a lot of information on uniforms of British army- Line Infantry, Cavalry and other arms period 1855-1900. Now I am put my mind on British Yeomanry and volunteer Battalions period 1890-1900. I have already prepared a list of the uniforms color and facing color of volunteer battalion and submitted on this forum. But I want to the detail information of the tunic, cuff and collar design of British yeomanry, volunteer battalions.

That is my information.

Regards

Shams

Edited by sbintayab

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I have some images on Skinner's horse. I want to share with you-

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Hi Shams. Very nice to know a little about you - when do you expect to go to Canada for your Doctorate ? You will have plenty of our members to contact.

The illustrations you sent were exceptional - in one of them the officer is wearing the 1912 pattern cavalry sword - so, it matches the porcelain figure. Thankyou.

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Dear Mervyn,

Take my regards.Please check your Private massage of this forum. I have some more images on Skinner's Horse. If you like to enjoy these, I can upload these.

Regards

Shams

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Welcome Shams- try McGill-their computer and math department are excellent.

When I was a wee chap my next door neighbor was Skinners' last commander- Colonel Grey. He was a very decent chap and gave me some of his old gear. I have one of his turbans in the attic. He had amazing stories of lance charges against sheep stealing tribesmen. He had a great life and I think I was lucky to have known him.

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Modern photo from the regiments website:

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Dear,

You are really lucky person to meet the last British Commander of the regiment. I have already applied to McGill.

Regards

Shams

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Ulsterman - must have been a great experience to listen to his exploits from a previous era. The photo shows they are keeping up the trditions of the Regiment.

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Mervyn,

Years ago while I was living in New Delhi I visited a church in Old Delhi. There were many paques in the interior of the church as memorials to those who died in the Mutiny. The Skinner family graves were in a separate fenched area in the back yard of the church.

Regards,

Gordon

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