Jump to content

Recommended Posts

With so many 'new' Countries being created - particularly in Africa - it is always a problem to have new flags, medals and awards. Usually they follow the politics of the new Govt. and commemorate some strange idealistic subjects in poorly made design.

The exception to this was Rhodesia. When U.D.I. (Unilateral Declaration of Independence - the decision to have Independence with only one party agreeing) was declared in 1965, they had the same problem of creating new names, Institutions, flags and also, medals and awards. However, you must remember that the decision to 'break' links was really the fault of a very intransigent British Govt. - under Harold Wilson.

The approx. 250,000 white population were mostly of British descent and had fought strongly in both World Wars. They did not want their link with Britain forgotten and so most of the changes were not 'new' ideas but, rather revisions on the old familiar ways.

Medals and Awards, therefore, followed the pattern of the established order - just with changes to design. The Order of the British Empire has always been a convenient way to reward both Military and Civilians - with different grades to cover most eventualities. The Rhodesian Govt. decided to follow this tried and trusted scheme and set-up the Rhodesian Legion of Merit.

They were given out with extreme caution in order to protect the esteem in which they were held. The different grades followed the British system -

coming down from the very top ones to a Commander of the Legion of Merit - and an Officer of the LM - and, finally a Member. An M.L.M. (Member of the Legion of Merit) was the direct equivalent of an M.B.E. - carried the right to have the initials following the name and was worn as a breast decoration.

The period of U.D.I. only lasted until 1980. Mainly economic problems and the small population were responsible - but, one cannot overlook the treachery of the British Govt. who were determined to hand the Country to political activists. The result can be clearly seen today in the state of Zimbabwe.

During this 15 year period there was a continuing war against terrorism - but, only 300 MLM's to civilians were awarded and 55 to the Military. This makes the award one of the rarer and most sought after for collectors.

post-6209-007194100 1294840440_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I must now go into a little detail concerning this award and it's accompanying medals. For the present I have only the full size MLM and also, the miniature medal bar with this award present. I am expecting the full bar to be brought-in - but, this may take a little time. The award roll for the MLM has been checked and he is named. However, I know little more about the original awardee and if anyone can help, I will be most grateful.

He was Lt. Col. John EVERINGTON MLM and I believe that he was originally an officer with the Ghurkas. He lived in Bulawayo and as this is a Civilian award he must have been retired.

The second group of three medals - incl. a British Efficiency Medals - is named to Lt. L.S.EVERINGTON of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps. This has the min.set. I have no idea what his role was in Rhodesia.

One very interesting point is that both sets of miniatures have a different ribbon on some medals. This is for The Honourable Artillery Company - one of Britain's most distinguished Regiments and I am told it was customary for officers to show the HAC colours on min.medals for identification. Has anyone else heard of this. The HAC has always tended to include a lot of City of London businessmen due to the proximity of the HQ to the City.

The miniatures - incl. MLM and an Officers Decoration.

post-6209-074128100 1294841327_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Lord that is rare.

Is that real silver? It appears as if that is painted on enamel.

Is there a Who's Who for southern Africa at all?

Worthy of an OMRS article methinks-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I must now go into a little detail concerning this award and it's accompanying medals. For the present I have only the full size MLM and also, the miniature medal bar with this award present. I am expecting the full bar to be brought-in - but, this may take a little time. The award roll for the MLM has been checked and he is named. However, I know little more about the original awardee and if anyone can help, I will be most grateful.

He was Lt. Col. John EVERINGTON MLM and I believe that he was originally an officer with the Ghurkas. He lived in Bulawayo and as this is a Civilian award he must have been retired.

The second group of three medals - incl. a British Efficiency Medals - is named to Lt. L.S.EVERINGTON of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps. This has the min.set. I have no idea what his role was in Rhodesia.

One very interesting point is that both sets of miniatures have a different ribbon on some medals. This is for The Honourable Artillery Company - one of Britain's most distinguished Regiments and I am told it was customary for officers to show the HAC colours on min.medals for identification. Has anyone else heard of this. The HAC has always tended to include a lot of City of London businessmen due to the proximity of the HQ to the City.

The miniatures - incl. MLM and an Officers Decoration.

Lt Col John Edmund EVERINGTON came to Rhodesia 1st Dec 1947. Born 20/10/09 in London. Served S Lancs Regt. Not sure what he received the MLM for but he held a few important appointments in Rhodesia; Member Defence Exemptions Board, Chair Rhodesian Railways Ind, Hon Rep in Rhodesia for the Forces Help Society, Director Central African Airways (1957 - 1963), etc. I can drop you a scan of the page from Whos Who of Southern Africa that I have.

Rich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Rich - thankyou very much for that information on the Col. - goes a long way to explain his background. I would be pleased to have the extract - perhaps you could email it to - cathay@iafrica.com

Mervyn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the HAC ribbon: you are correct, Mervyn: members of the Honourable Artillery Company use the special ribbon on LS&GC awards for their volunteer service, but on both full-size & miniature medals. The colours are said to be based on the Royal racing colours.

May I request permission to use the MLM image on my website, please? (With, of course, acknowledgement of source.) As you say, it's rare and these are the only decent pictures I've seen of one!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thankyou for that confirmation on the HAC, Megan. Please use whichever images you need. Would it help if I emailed a full set ? Mervyn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Lord that is rare.

Is that real silver? It appears as if that is painted on enamel.

Is there a Who's Who for southern Africa at all?

Worthy of an OMRS article methinks-

No the Member of the Legion of Merit (MLM) was bronze but silver plated. The next award was the Officer of the Legion of Merit (OLM) which was solid Rhodesian silver. All the Legion of Merit Awards above the MLM were solid silver although some were gold plated. This one is genuine but there are many copies. I have a civil MLM & CLM. Both excellent pieces of work and detail like all of the Rhodesian medals from that period. The enamel work is also excellent on all of the genuine Rhodesian awards. Quite a few of the copies have a lower standard of enamel (possibly painted on) and in one case I have seen a copy where the centre that would normally be enamelled was painted instead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear all,

as this is an older post I hope someone's gonna answer my questions.

I just started my Interest in Rhodesia, its history and also its award system.

The Legion of Merit is a very fine and excellent looking award but I couldn't find answers to all of my questions.

Basics:

Member of the Legion of Merit - silver cross with golden "Zimbawe Bird"

Officer of the Legion of Merit  - golden cross with silver "Zimbawe Bird"

Commander of the Legion of Merit  - golden cross with silver "Zimbawe Bird"

Grand Officer of the Legion of Merit - golden cross with silver "Zimbawe Bird"

Grand Commander of the Legion of Merit - golden cross with silver "Zimbawe Bird"

Is this correct?

Did all crosses have the same size, also the neck orders?

 

The military division had a thin red line on its ribbon to differ it from the civil divison.

Additionally the military division hat rosettes on the ribbon: 

Member - golden Rosette

Officer - silver Rosette

Commander - red Rosette

Grand Officer - no rosette

Is this correct?

Why didn' the civilian Division have rosettes?

Where the rosette the only way to differ the classes (if all crosses had the same size)?

 

Thank you for your help!

Best regards,

Leo

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13/01/2011 at 02:10, Ulsterman said:

Good Lord that is rare.

Is that real silver? It appears as if that is painted on enamel.

Is there a Who's Who for southern Africa at all?

Worthy of an OMRS article methinks-

 

On 14/01/2016 at 22:59, LeoLinz said:

Dear all,

as this is an older post I hope someone's gonna answer my questions.

I just started my Interest in Rhodesia, its history and also its award system.

The Legion of Merit is a very fine and excellent looking award but I couldn't find answers to all of my questions.

Basics:

Member of the Legion of Merit - silver cross with golden "Zimbawe Bird"

Officer of the Legion of Merit  - golden cross with silver "Zimbawe Bird"

Commander of the Legion of Merit  - golden cross with silver "Zimbawe Bird"

Grand Officer of the Legion of Merit - golden cross with silver "Zimbawe Bird"

Grand Commander of the Legion of Merit - golden cross with silver "Zimbawe Bird"

Is this correct?

Did all crosses have the same size, also the neck orders?

 

The military division had a thin red line on its ribbon to differ it from the civil divison.

Additionally the military division hat rosettes on the ribbon: 

Member - golden Rosette

Officer - silver Rosette

Commander - red Rosette

Grand Officer - no rosette

Is this correct?

Why didn' the civilian Division have rosettes?

Where the rosette the only way to differ the classes (if all crosses had the same size)?

 

Thank you for your help!

Best regards,

Leo

 

 

Yes. I have all of the rosettes and all of the ribbons. I have yet to display them. One day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...