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For the Diamond Jubilee (60) of Queen Victoria in 1897 there were enormous official celebrations - including major parades through London.

We see many of the Police Jubilee medals - however, this is the first time I have seen an official pass. Obviously to someone of importance - it is 9ct. gold, I can only think of a Chief Constable. However, what do these initials mean ?

I am thinking along the lines of East Riding Constabulary Board - but, then why a Pass. Was the Parade in - perhaps - Leeds. Or, did East Yorks send a contingent to London - a big possibilitity ?

Please put your thinking caps on and see if we can find the answer to something that has puzzled me for 30 years ?

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Passes to the official London parade where issued by the metropolitan police which bore the above inscription. Most were gilt, but I am assuming the above was a VIP pass of some description as it was in gold is there a pass number on it as I understand they should have been returned after the parade. Maybe the letters represent the entry zones in which the pass allowed the holder.

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Have look at this I have just found :rolleyes: , seems as though a similar badge was awarded to the press it mentions ERCB but does not explain I think it stands for the level of access or areas that can be accessed.

http://www.victorianlondon.org/publications2/lookeron-24.htm

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Tom - thankyou for your comments - and particularly for the link to the old report of the Day.

The Pass does sound to be similar to the Press Pass' - however, the report mentions that thay are numbered and were under 600 in number. This one has no number and I suspect that the design was a universal one - with alterations for the exact purpose. This could account for the gold surround ? The letters ERCB are still a mystery, but whichever Authority they stood for - they do seem to be for London.

I must say that this report is a fine historical document and comments on the Social angle - which is unusual. Under the historical photographs sub-forum - we had a long correspondence on photos from Queen Victoria's funeral procession. This could almost cover both processions - and in all cases the greed and rapaciousness of the seat and window vendors , matches present practises.

I WOULD RECOMMEND READING THIS LINK FOR AN INSIGHT INTO LIFE IN 1897 - that is, providing your eyesight is good..........

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Interesting item I do like a puzzle ? Mervyn out of interest does the token have a hallmark on it ?

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No - not to my memory - however, I do remember it being quite heavy. There is one thing to remember with official passes - The Metropolitan Police have used quality ones - from the earliest days - to indicate importance.

Mayne and Rowan - the first two joint Commissioners carried Gold identification badges and these have continued to the present. The Comm. and the Deputy Commissioner are still identified by a gold pass - and in addition they are both still sworn in as JP's (Justices of the Peace). This was very necessary when a magistrate was required to read the Riot Act in public - and the Civilian ones had usually made a run for-it ! At least you could push the Comm. forward and hold him in place.

I always remember a long and tiring march following the 'Bloody Sunday' incident in Belfast. The marchers were very militant and were carrying 13 coffins at the front. We were far too few in number and spaced about every 100 yards during the march. When we were going down Haymarket, I spotted the Comm. and Dep. Comm. in a shop doorway watching - very smart in overcoats and Bowler hats ! I made a point of saluting - which drew the marchers attention + a few well chosen words..... Probably why I never got my BEM ?

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Hey Mervyn,

Hope you are well.

Ok, as someone who has trawled through many a Victorian MEPO and HO file, knowing how these things go down, and recognising the ERCB instatntly, I'm pretty confidant that after 30 odd years I've nailed it for you.

ERCB are the initials for one Sir Edward Riley Colbourne Bradford. Chief Commisioner to the Metropolitan Police force from 1890 till 1903, which obviously empassed the 1897 jubilee.

I hope you can sleep a little easier now ;-)

Cheers

Monty

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Mayne and Rowan - the first two joint Commissioners carried Gold identification badges and these have continued to the present. The Comm. and the Deputy Commissioner are still identified by a gold pass - and in addition they are both still sworn in as JP's (Justices of the Peace). This was very necessary when a magistrate was required to read the Riot Act in public - and the Civilian ones had usually made a run for-it ! At least you could push the Comm. forward and hold him in place.

Mervyn,

I hope you will forgive my correcting you. The Commissioner, Deputy Commissioner and Assistant Commissioners are no longer Justices of the Peace. The Administration of Justice Act 1973 which became law on the 1st April 1974, amended the Metropolitan Police Act and removed the JP appointment from them. Also, tokens/passes (of whatever type of metal) are no longer issued. The Commissioner now has a warrant card (signed by himself) which is fitted into a red satin lined black leather wallet. The wallet has inside it a silver and enamel representation of the Metpol. Coat of Arms. This same style wallet is carried by all ranks above and including Commander. No other identification is carried. The law relating to the Met. Police has changed considerably in the last 30 plus years. The force is now overviewed by a Police Committee (not the Home Secretary) in much the same way as the County Police forces of England & Wales.

I hope this information is helpful.

Best wishes,

Dave.

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Hello Monty - delighted to hear from you and best wishes for 2012. What are the projects you are working on at present ?

I never heard back from the City Curator - I expect she had other Insurance valuations.

Your identification of the Gold Pass is excellent - we had a long discussion on it - but, never reached a conclusion. Now that you have it

pinned as the personal pass for the Commissioner I'm very pleased that I haven't given it away. Thankyou for recognising the initials. Mervyn

Dave - I am grateful for you up-dating my post. I was not aware that the Magistrate status had been withdrawn from the Comm. and the Dep. Comm.

I suppose in this day and age - and with the dropping of the Riot Act - that it was un-necessary. Still old Honours and Traditions are being discarded

too quickly - a Force without pride in it's past becomes like a security company.

Your info. on the tokens and new warrant cards is also very informative - we need this up-to-date info. I don't see the Job papers here and my interests are more historical. Mervyn

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Hi Mervyn,

Best wishes to you for 2012.

Didn't she contact you? She never mentioned it again so I assumed she had, apologies.

The documentary came out in January last year and I think is doing the rounds on Sky or something. My work also appeared in the Find my Past doc the other month.

Doing some more work at the month but nothing major.

I don't think it was Bradfords personal pass, just that it was authorised by him, hence his initials.

Cheers

Monty

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As a very inactive member of the GMIC I still follow post and learn from it. Now I can give back a bit as I have an example of this Diamond Jubilee press pass, and would like to post a couple of photos for the record.   

It is numbered 355 and marked to Bowman Limited, London as the maker.

An excellent account of how this badge was obtained and used by an American reporter can be found in a book that is available in readable format online;  "A Looker On In London" by Mary H. Krout, an author and reporter for a Chicago newspaper.

FireMedals

 

QV - 1.jpg

QV - 2.jpg

QV - 3.jpg

QV - 3.jpg

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Thank you for a most interesting post.  That is a wonderful example of a rare item that will be envied by collectors of Jubilee memorabilia.

Regards

Brett

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