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Chris,

I do not think I have ever seen one of these up close before. It really is detailed. :cheers:

Best wishes

Matt

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nice.

I believe it signifies the WgM. Awarded for a specific act of gallantry. Sources vary, but a rare medal with some 4,000+ awarded.

Edited by Claudius

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WgM would use a golden wreath. The green enemaled wreath is for a knight's cross of the order.

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WgM would use a golden wreath. The green enemaled wreath is for a knight's cross of the order.

Ahh....thank you.

Need to take a few more sips of coffee this morning.

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So... as someone who gets lost with any initials other than "E.K."...

What do I have ? :-)

This:

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The Militär-Verdienstorden, Württemberg's highest military honor, similar to the Prussian Pour le Mérite, Bavaria's Militär-Max Joseph-Orden, Saxony's Militär-St. Heinrichs-Orden, and Baden's Militär-Karl-Friedrich-Verdienstorden.

Since the same ribbon was used for the order and for the Militär-Verdienstmedaille, ribbon devices were authorized in November 1917. The green enameled wreath indicated the order, and a gilt wreath indicated the Goldene Militär-Verdienstmedaille. No wreath indicated the Silberne Militär-Verdienstmedaille.

There were a little over 2,000 awards in World War I, so it wasn't as uncommon as the Max Joseph or Karl Friedrich. It was probably more comparable in that respect to the Saxon St. Heinrich. Also, until some time late in the war, if an officer previously received the Goldene Militär-Verdienstmedaille or the Friedrichs-Orden mit Schwertern, he would return the lower order for the MVO. Thus ribbon bars like yours where a prestigious decoration like the MVO is all alone with just an EK2 and FKE in a classic soldier's trio.

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...if an officer previously received the Goldene Militär-Verdienstmedaille or the Friedrichs-Orden mit Schwertern, he would return the lower order for the MVO.

Still, some officers (Erwin Rommel is a good example) continued wearing both (MVO and Friedrichs-Orden) at the same time.

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Still, some officers (Erwin Rommel is a good example) continued wearing both (MVO and Friedrichs-Orden) at the same time.

Rommel is actually a good example. He received the Friedrichs-Orden, Ritterkreuz 2. Klasse mit Schwertern, on 1 November 1914. On 8 April 1915, he received the Militär-Verdienstorden "an Stelle des ihm durch Allerhöchste Ordre vom 1. November 1914 verliehenen Ritterkreuzes zweiter Klasse des Friedrichs-Ordens mit Schwertern." So he had to turn in the lower award. Later in the war, after the rules were changed, he received the Friedrichs-Orden, Ritterkreuz 1. Klasse mit Schwertern. That one he got to keep.

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The Militär-Verdienstorden, Württemberg's highest military honor, similar to the Prussian Pour le Mérite, Bavaria's Militär-Max Joseph-Orden, Saxony's Militär-St. Heinrichs-Orden, and Baden's Militär-Karl-Friedrich-Verdienstorden.

Since the same ribbon was used for the order and for the Militär-Verdienstmedaille, ribbon devices were authorized in November 1917. The green enameled wreath indicated the order, and a gilt wreath indicated the Goldene Militär-Verdienstmedaille. No wreath indicated the Silberne Militär-Verdienstmedaille.

There were a little over 2,000 awards in World War I, so it wasn't as uncommon as the Max Joseph or Karl Friedrich. It was probably more comparable in that respect to the Saxon St. Heinrich. Also, until some time late in the war, if an officer previously received the Goldene Militär-Verdienstmedaille or the Friedrichs-Orden mit Schwertern, he would return the lower order for the MVO. Thus ribbon bars like yours where a prestigious decoration like the MVO is all alone with just an EK2 and FKE in a classic soldier's trio.

Dave,

This is a very good explanation. :cheers: I have learnt something from it.

Thank you

Matt

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The Wuerttemberg MVO with crown is an almost fairytale looking item with unforgettable visual appeal.

Such an item sold on eBay.de yesterday for 740 Euros (less than $1000) surprisingly cheap considering how rare these are.

Is it possible that this was a jeweler's copy, and if so, what are the clues that they are copies?

Edited by garfordhouse

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