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Persia - Order of the Lion and the Sun

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This beautiful early piece is in the Morton & Eden Auction 90 November 23, 2017. Copy from the Morton & Eden auction listing: Iran, Persian Empire, The Royal Persian Order of the Lion and the Sun, Grand Cross Breast Star, Russian-made, circa 1850, by Andrews of St. Petersburg, in pierced silver, rose gold and enamels, of superb quality manufacture, backplate in pale gold engraved 'Andrews à St Petersbourg', with vertical brooch-pin for suspension (keeper now lacking), 88mm, extremely fine and an exceptional early Russian-made breast star. Presumed to have been commissioned by Keir Grant some years after his formal award of the Order of the Lion and the Sun for wear in conventional European style. This high-quality Russian-made badge by Andrews of St. Petersburg may well have been ordered in Paris. Awarded to Major-General Sir William Keir Grant K.C.B., G.C.H., 6th Dragoon Guards, late 15th Light Dragoons, who became Colonel of the Royal Scots Greys. William Keir (later Keir Grant) was one of just eight Officers of the 15th Light Dragoons to receive the spectacular gold Ehrenmedaille für Englische Kavalleriste, expressly awarded by the Holy Roman Emperor, Francis II, for gallantry in saving him personally from capture by French forces at the Battle of Villers-en-Cauchies (which is variously spelled in historical records), near Cambrai, in 1794. As it so happened, Keir Grant was later to become the recipient of an equally rare honour – the Collar and insignia of the Order of the Lion and Sun of Persia - for commanding a major British military expedition to the 'Pirate Coast' on the south-eastern Persian Gulf. Having roundly defeated the enemy and pacified the pirate stronghold of Ras al-Khaimah, Keir Grant succeeded in securing an agreement with a number of important tribal leaders, leading to an historic Peace Treaty of 1820 which heralded local truces and the foundation of the Trucial Sheikhdoms as well as the abolition of the Slave Trade in the area. Modifications to the Treaty and a full revision many decades later, in 1892, contributed to an enhanced British presence in the Southern Gulf and important new relationships with the Trucial Sheikhdoms. A loose British Protectorate was to last until the gaining of their independence on 2 December 1970, in turn leading to the creation of the United Arab Emirates.

5D474BEE-9A94-4EEF-9481-26B2AE6F7D3C.jpeg

Edited by Markus

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Markus,

A beautiful star. Perhaps I am stretching my reading of the script, but it would appear to read (as far as I can interpret the slightly mangled script), "Nishan Qajr Fateh ??" ( Qajr Order of Victory ??). Or perhaps just wishful interpretation on my part!

Regards,

Owain

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Hi Oamotme

It actually reads: "fath- ali shah qajar" which is the name of the qajar king 

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Ramin7,

Many thanks for this correction - almost 2 out of 4 words is good for me!

Owain

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On 24/01/2012 at 01:40, g1usxs said:

One more from an auction:

persian2.jpg

Saw one of these in the mid 90s after my grandfather passed away, my Dad, brother and I helped clear his house out, my Dad, sadly went onto sell one that looked very similar to this and a number of family medals from various generations.

I remember seeing the Lion and the Sun centre, obviously not knowing what it was and thinking to myself that it appeared to have been painted by a child.

I have been retracing the story of my those family members, one in particular whose medals were also sold on was my Great Uncle Capt Alfred William Will, former Seaforth TF, pte RAMC 60542 at the western front and later commissoned into the South Persian rifles, I could not find any Lion & Sun related gazette entries other than his MC and Temp, commision, Alfred was killed with a Sgt Albert William Coomber (Royal sussex Regmnt) they were killed by his own troops of the SPR in a Jihad on 25/5/1918 at Fort Khaneh-i-Zinian as a consequence of growing anti british sentiments.

I have asked my father where the order came from, he guessed it was maybe placed at the local war memorial by a Major Grant from Dornoch (known personally to Alfred), Maj Grant being one of the mounted section that later arrived to take back the Fort and hold those accountable and also recover the 2 bodies, could it be that this order was Maj Grants, Alfred's or one of the number of SPR mutineers who were later executed?.

There are apparently some files in the British Library regarding 13 or executions.

I have recently spoken to the son of Major Grant although he informs me that his father never talked about his time other than some funny stories, the Majors personal items from his time in service were all donated to the IWM.

I also rememer seeing a green ribbon with a strange rosette.

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I think the OoTL&S I referred in the above post was most likely not awarded to Captain Robert Grant from Dornoch (1/5 Seaforth, Scinde Horse and later 41st Indian Cavalry and RFA I.A.O.R), but was more than likely awarded Lt Col George Patrick Grant, the reason I believe this was, having read the official histories and various despatches by Sir P Sykes, it would appear Lt Col Grant was charged with relieving the fort and had decided to attack the besieging forces at another location, tragically leaving the mutiny at the Fort to go ahead, could it be that his items were left out of a degree of personal guilt he placed on himself for not arriving in time?.

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