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During 1911 it was decided to reorganize the police forces of the newly formed Union of South Africa on the lines of that used in the former Cape Colony. With effect from 1 April 1913, (Act 14 of 1912), two police forces were formed within the Union of South Africa. The SA Mounted Rifles was formed by the amalgamation of the Cape Mounted Police (CMP), Cape Mounted Rifles (CMR), Natal Police (NP), Orange Free State and Transvaal Police (TP).

The SA Mounted Rifles comprised five regiments based around the Union. The 1st Regiment (CMR) was based in King William's Town and patrolled the Transkei and part of the Eastern Cape. The 2nd and 3rd Regiments (NP) were at Pietermaritzburg and Dundee respectively. The 4th Regiment (TP) was based in Pretoria, whilst the remaining unit, the 5th Regiment (CMP) was based in Kimberley. In addition to these regiments, an artillery brigade of five batteries was attached to the SAMR

In 1916 provision was made for Military Police in the personnel strength of a unit, and from 1916 until 1922 a detachment of Military Police was placed on the strength of the SAMR. These Military Policemen carried out their specialised duties from a police station. At Roberts Heights a detachment of 14 men apparently existed for some time. This detachment consisted of a Sergeant, a Corporal and 12 Lance Corporals. A staff officer to the O.C. Troops at Roberts Heights was appointed as both OC Military Police and as Superintendent of the Detention Barracks. It is believed that details of military police were to be found in the garrison centres of the Union at this time, for example, Cape Town, Potchefstroom and Durban.

In 1920 the five SAMR regiments were disbanded. Twenty-six officers, 196 NCO's and 1022 men were transferred to the SA Police, leaving the remainder to be formed into a single regiment still stationed in Pretoria at Roberts Heights. This last regiment was to remain until 1926.

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http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_02_2012/post-3034-0-24961500-1329550355.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_02_2012/post-3034-0-41384500-1329550372.jpg

Greater badge detail.

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http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_02_2012/post-3034-0-87165600-1329551865.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_02_2012/post-3034-0-26646400-1329551892.jpg

Martingale badge and detail.

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http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_02_2012/post-3034-0-01879200-1329554572.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_02_2012/post-3034-0-41942900-1329554594.jpg

Rare pattern 1925 webbing worn by the 1st SAMR before they were disbanded in 1926.

This webbing was also know as the Pattern 19 in Canada.

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http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_02_2012/post-3034-0-78283500-1329554878.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_02_2012/post-3034-0-01544400-1329554903.jpg

View of the rear of the equipment.

The set which does not include the lower part of the back-pack.

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Some rare and lovely items, Will.

We appreciate you showing them on this section of the Forum. The Police Museum would be very envious of you -

however, I doubt that they would recognise many of the pieces

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Will

Thank you for showing us more of your amazing collection. In spite of my interest in the SAMR and its foundations, I had not seen many of the badges in your displays.

Regards

Brett

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http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_02_2012/post-3034-0-22578200-1329794036.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_02_2012/post-3034-0-23936800-1329794062.jpg

Major Gordon-Gray, an SAMR officer.

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Chris,

Sorry, I only saw your post and questions now.

I was briefly in South Africa but I am travelling again, hence my "serialised" postings.

The cross belt and pouch with its very ornate badges were only issued to officers and are therefore rare. Thye are very well made and ornate.

Regards,

Will

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I have wondered about the SAMR stringed bugle collar badges for some time. I saw pictures of them before but have not come across a picture of any SAMR person actually wearing them on the uniform. Do you have any info about which orders of dress they were worn on? The pictures of uniforms I have seen are mostly officers wearing service dress in WW1 without any collar badges. Were they perhaps full dress only?

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