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Laurence Strong

Ehrenkrueuz der Deutschen Mutter / Mothers Cross

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Thanks Christopher, I just like the beat-up ones too (and they are much more inexpensive to buy). I will never pay full value for a damaged cross, but I think they still add to a collection. Speaking of which, I just picked up a semi-damaged Mutterkreuz in Silber with original ribbon today for a decent price. It too has some enamel damage but it can hold the place for a minty one when I come across one! Now I just need to get a good bronzer and I'll have the set. Thanks for looking.

Cheera :beer:

Pat

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...and finally a pic showing the ribbon as well. Please feel free to leave your comments!

Pat

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The Mothers cross/ Mothers medal.... we dont get it... do we?

Sure.... sure.... sure.... we all know what a MILF is.... but they are not ALL Milfs.... are they?

When Brunhilda has her 8th Sprog, and Olga has her 7th future Commisar and Clenentine is Honoured by la Republique for producing a 10th little runner up for the academie francaise...

I mean. they may all be nice ladies and all.... but they will be getting on in years....

At some point there is the "I dont fancy yours mate..." reaction......

But the Brits have sorted this out years ago......

For the tired bank employee who comes home at 6:00 P.M to cold pea soup, 14 rugrats running around and breaking the china plates.... and a wife who is aiming for a 15th..... the drive and desire may wane a little bit in the poor man......

But to keep the ecomony growing, his input is needed!!!!

And so they created a medal for just such a case.....

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In same case it is awarded just for service... in some cases gallantry IS the order of the day......

Chris! do I detect a note of envy. . . . . with regards this award :P

Kevin :beer:

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LMAO Chris were do you find this stuff.

Chris! do I detect a note of envy. . . . . with regards this award :P

Kevin :beer:

I am begining to think thats why he has time for all this. ;)

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LMAO Chris were do you find this stuff.

I am begining to think thats why he has time for all this. ;)

I was flipping through the Medal yearbook.... and there it was....

(almost pocked my eye out!)

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Hi All...

I'm looking for your opinions / help with this Gold Mothers Cross (Ehrenkreuz der Deutschen Mutter). I have had it in my collection for quite a while but only recently took it out again for a close inspection.

mutter1.jpg

I have some issues with it and would like to know if you guys share my concerns.

It came in a case marked 'Alois Rettenmaier, Schwabisch - Gmund.' I have no problems with the case, but my questions re: the cross are:

In comparison to my other Mothers crosses, the blue enamel is very heavy on this one, almost opaque - the stippled pattern underneath can only be seen under very strong light. Note in the picture below, this cross (centre) does not have the same transparency in the blue enamel as the bronze and silver versions.

mutter3.jpg

One of my other problems with it is that it is ever so slightly smaller that the other two. (1mm approx in height). Does anyone know what the tolerance levels were for these crosses? (I know that some EK2's vary in size by very small amounts).

mutter2.jpg

mutter5.jpg

Apologies for the quality of the scans of the reverse of the cross, the bright gold finish is very difficult to scan.

The inscription on the reverse of the gold (centre) does not strike me as being as 'crisp' as the others either.

mutter6.jpg

What do you guys think? Have I got a fake in the collection??

Thanks in advance for any help or opinions.

Regards - Danny

mutter4.jpg

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Danny, nothing wrong there, good looking cross.

there are slight differences between motherscrosses e.g the the swastika in the centre is sometimes "loose" in the white enamel and sometimes only touching with one or two of it's arms the border, but this one looks just fine to me. The gold finish looks great too!

Regards,

Gaston

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Thanks guys for the good news! :cheers:

I had suspected that it was a good one, but a friend was looking at it and he put the seed of doubt in my mind regarding the opacity of the enamel. :speechless:

It's good to receive confirmation of its authenticity... back into the collection!

Thanks again!

Regards - Danny

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To complete my semi beat up set is the bronze.

Thanks for any comments,

Pat

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and reverse of the above Mutterkreuz in bronze.

Pat

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Howdy, Gents.

I'm more of an old photograph collector, but i've always admired the Mothers Cross, just something about the blue and white enamal combination, especially on the silver version. I finally think i'm going to take the plundge and get one, but i'd like to know the price spread on them currently. They seem to be fairly available in a 3 classes, and i obviously don't want to pay too much, especially for a damaged version.

The search function isn't working for me, so i'm either failing the 10% Rule, or i'm restricted. I bring it up as i'd lke to get a gander at some fake MCs, but the section that i found the link to is restricted to me.

Thanks much, in advance.

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Hello, Not sure what prices you are having to pay in the U.S. but I bought my silver mothers cross last year in the UK for £45 (sterling) approx $70 U.S. I've attached a picture of mine and yes I agree the silver is a better looker than either gold or bronze but thats our opinion?

Hope you find what you are looking for.

muckaroon1960

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Howdy, Gents.

I'm more of an old photograph collector, but i've always admired the Mothers Cross, just something about the blue and white enamal combination, especially on the silver version. I finally think i'm going to take the plundge and get one, but i'd like to know the price spread on them currently. They seem to be fairly available in a 3 classes, and i obviously don't want to pay too much, especially for a damaged version.

The search function isn't working for me, so i'm either failing the 10% Rule, or i'm restricted. I bring it up as i'd lke to get a gander at some fake MCs, but the section that i found the link to is restricted to me.

Thanks much, in advance.

Hi

i have recently sold one of each of the 3 classes of mothers cross in the UK.

I asked and recieved £35 for the bronze, £45 for silver and £60 for Gold.

All the enamels were excellent and they really were lovely examples.

I actually know a chap who has a few examples that he is looking to sell on. I can pass on his details if you are interested? Send me a PM if you would like me to.

Dan

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Hello there,

It is my opinion that pricing mother's crosses is a difficult task as they are so relatively common and when it comes time to sell there's a ton of competition.

William Kramer

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Ehrenkreuz der Deutschen Mutter, Cross of Honour of the German Mother.

This was a state decoration and civil order of merit awarded to mothers for exceptional merit to Germany. This decoration was awarded from 1939 until 1945 in three classes, these classes being, bronze, silver and gold. All of the classes were awarded to mothers who exhibited exemplary motherhood and in the case of the bronze or 3rd Class award conceived four to five children. The silver or 2nd Class was awarded to mothers with six to seven children and the gold or 1st Class to mothers with eight or more children.

The award was introduced by decree in Berlin in 1938 by the then Chancellor of Germany, Adolf Hitler and awarded annually mainly on Mother’s Day as well as other national association’s annual events of celebrations.

The award of this decoration was highly regarded by the German Government and the mothers nominated for the award were thoroughly investigated to assure that they met the qualifications. A number of benefits were associated with the award including a small financial benefit and preferential treatment within public service such as medical, clothing, schooling and housing. Upon the death of the recipient the Mother’s Cross of Honour was, by statute, allowed to be inheritable by the bereaved family as a keepsake of remembrance.

The design of the cross is based on an elongated iron cross similar to the cross of the Teutonic Knights Order. The body of the cross is blue with a narrow white enamelled border. A sunburst with a roundel in its centre with the words, “DER DEUTSCHEN MUTTER”, English translation: OF THE GERMAN MOTHER around a black swastika is situated where the two parts of the cross intersect. The reverse features the date of introduction, “16 Dezember 1938” beneath which is a facsimile of the signature of the Chancellor, Adolf Hitler. I believe it is quite rare for any national leader to actually have their signature appear on the reverse of a medal of decoration. Not that this is an actual autograph per sae, however, it is a copy of his signature which I personally find interesting. From what I have read, from several sources, Adolf Hitler held his own mother in very high esteem. This, in my opinion, may have been a why his signature appears on the German Mother’s Cross. The award was worn around the neck on a thin blue and white ribbon. This was the only official manner of wear though a miniature example is known which was worn suspended from a blue and white bow made of the same ribbon as the neck ribbon. This was a semi-official approved version and a bow alone was also authorized for general everyday wear.

The decoration could be withdrawn at any time after being awarded if it was found that the recipient acted in a manner which conflicted to the criteria set out for the award. An example would be if the mother abandoned her children

At the end of World War Two and the fall of the Third Reich all medals and awards bearing the swastika became illegal to wear and so the Mutterehrenkreuz (Mother’s Cross of Honour) also became illegal and therefore was no longer worn.

Opinion:

It has been held that Hitler implemented this award only to encourage large families in order to fill the ranks of the German military. However, one should keep in mind that when this award was first introduced the world had just gone through a change in morals and a life style not in keeping with the family values of the past. The Roaring Twenties had just ended and a need to bring the thinking of the younger population back in line with the more traditional family values was needed. While this indeed had the additional “benefit” of providing a larger number of young men for military service I believe there were more reasons than purely providing cannon fodder.

One of the reasons for my statement is that Germany has not been the only country to implement an award to honour mothers who raised several children in an appropriate manner. In 1920 France implemented the Médaille de la Famille française (Medal of the French Family). Another example would be the Order of Maternal Glory and Mother Heroine of the Soviet Union from the same era.

Sources:

Wikipedia: Cross of Honor of the German Mother

Examples: From the author’s collection

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