gerardkenny

Ireland, Dublin - National Maritime Museum

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For any visitors to Dublin this is a recently re-opened museum that is worth a visit (Dun Laoghaire stop on the DART Line). It is not on the scale of the Hamburg Maritime Museum but is very interesting in my opinion. Here are some photographs taken at the 'National Maritime Museum of Ireland', which is located in the Old Mariners Church (1837), Dún Laoghaire, Dublin.

Included are some pictures of the KV Merlogue exhibition, the Baily Optic, the Neutral Ireland maritime oil paintings (by Kenneth King) and some of the Irish Naval History displays. This museum re-opened in June 2012 after a 6 year refurbishment.

The Baily Optic - in use from 1902 to 1972 at Baily Lighthouse in Howth.

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A sample of the memorial plaques left over from the Mariners Church :

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WW1 Memorial, showing an assortment of regiments in which Irishmen served, at the Mariner's Church (Built 1836)

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Display item from National Maritime Museum of Ireland, Dún Laoghaire, Dublin

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'A record of the Services Rendered by the Dún Laoghaire Lifeboats'

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Kingstown (Dún Laoghaire) Station of the Royal National Life Boat Institute'

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Death Card to a drowning victim from the RMS Leinster, Augustus F.Doyle. The greatest sea tragedy in Irish history unfolded in 1918 when 12 miles from Dún Laoghaire Harbour the RMS Leinster was sank by U-boat U-132 leading to 501 deaths out of the 685 passengers and crew. The ship was transporting Irishmen in the British Army back to the battlefields of WWI. The anchor of the RMS Leinster forms a public memorial a short distance from the museum.

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Commemorative postage stamp of the sinking of the RMS Leinster in 1918

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RMS Leinster artifacts and model

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'Gallantry at Sea Medal' original sculptor's design maquettes, In 1923 the first Free State Government commissioned a sculptor (Albert G.Power RHA) to create a design for a Silver medal to be awarded for saving life at sea.

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'Design for the new proposed Asylum Harbour at Dun Leary 1817'. Tragedies such as the 'Rochdale' & 'Prince of Wales' in 1807 accelerated the plans for an asylum harbour in Dublin (now known as the East Pier), intended to protect ships from storms while they waited for high tide to access Dublin Port. On November 19th 1807 the 'Rochdale' & 'Prince of Wales' were transporting troops for the Napoleonic War, the next day both sank during heavy storms in Dublin harbour. The Irish men of the Militia on board the 'Prince of Wales' were allegedly locked below decks while the captain and crew escaped during the storm. Members of the North and South Mayo Militia joining the 97th Regiment of Foot and Cork Militia who joined the 18th Regiment of Foot. It's likely many would have been involved in the suppression of the 1798 United Irishmen Rebellion. It was said that a 12 foot plank could have saved many lives from the Rochdale as the ship went to ground immediately beside the Seapoint Martello Tower. There were no survivors from the 265 souls onboard the 'Rochdale', and only captain, crew and two soldiers from the 'Prince of Wales' were to survive. The passing of the 1801 act of Union which abolished the Irish Parliament was also a factor in precipitating the harbour design now that Irish M.P.'s would need to regularly travel to London. I read once that there was a greater volume of material used in this 'East Pier' than in the Pyramids (not sure if that is true or not). The 'West Pier' would be added years later.

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Sign from 1928 notifying visitors to the Carlisle Pier, Dún Laoghaire, (Adjacent to the East Pier & originally connected by Rail) of a charge of 3pence admission to the Pier to see off relatives. For generations the emigrants boat from Dún Laoghaire to hollyhead left from this East Pier.

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Part of the RMS Titanic display. The RMS Titanic sank 600 km south of Newfoundland in April 14th 1912 after having departed from Southampton, Cherbourg, Cobh

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Series of oil paintings by Kenneth King, depicting Irish Emergency (WW2) era merchant shipping, many of which participated in rescues of stricken seafarers and also fell victim to British and German attacks & mines. Included in this series are the Schooner Cymric (sank February 1944 with the loss of 11 lives), the SS Meath (mined and sunk in the Irish Sea 16th August 1940), the SS Clonlara (sunk 22nd August 1941 North Atlantic, 11 lives lost), SS Kerry Head (sunk by bombs 22nd October 1940 with 12 lives lost) & the Irish Larch.

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De-nazified German Destroyer Badge ('Zerstörerkriegsabzeichen'). Part of the display dealing with the MV Kerlogue, an Irish Emergency (WW2) era ship which was subjected to a sustained attack by Polish pilots of the RAF (despite being a clearly identified neutral) and also hit by a German mine. The MV Kerlogue and her crew went on to rescue men from both the Allied and German side during the war. The Wild Rose of Liverpool on 2nd April 1941 and most notably on 29 December 1943 the Kerlogue rescued 168 Kriegsmarine sailors of the German Destroyer Z27 & torpedo boats T25 and T26. Refusing German requests to put the men ashore in Brest and also refusing British requests to land the survivors at Land's End, the captain put the men ashore at Cobh and they were interned for the rest of the war in the Curragh, internment camp.

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The Baily Optic (reflection) - in use from 1902 to 1972 at Baily Lighthouse in Howth.

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Steamship, 'Great Eastern'. This was the largest ship in the world when it was built in 1857.

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Final shot of the Baily Optic at the National Maritime Museum of Ireland.

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Nice. I really like the Sea Scout uniforms. My daughter would love sea scouts.

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That is a great display. I would love to see it in person some day. I thought it was fascinating how they did tilt politacally a little toward the Germans, but played the Neutrality role fairly when it came to the handling of foreign combattants that were picked up in Ireland(including her seas).

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