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azyeoman

The Korean War is NOT forgotten

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Ethiopia - Only 3,518 soldiers served and and a few nurses served too. They never lost one inch of ground nor had anyone captured.

The silver war medal comes in two sizes. This is the larger of the two.

Edited by azyeoman

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This South Korean medal is now authorized to US Korean War vets as well.

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Could you give us a close-up of the S. African Korean Volunteers Medal P8640 L. Pond, please? (Obv. / Rev.)

Thanks,

Hugh

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Thank you for sharing your amazing Korean War collection with us. I am very envious! Seeing this collection is like receiving an early Christmas present.

Regards

Brett

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Do you see much in S. Africa dealing with the Cheetah Squadron? Are there any veterans organizations that recognize its contribution to the Korean War?

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Cheetah Squadron medal groups and other related items are not common and I see advertisements for them only a few times each year. Men who served in Korea are dying out so their once active veteran's group may no longer exist. The majority of South Africans have little sympathy or interest in the pre-1994 military history of this country, so in time the subject will be remembered only in other parts of the world - a repeat of the Rhodesia/Zimbabwe experience.

Regards

Brett

PS 2 Squadron SAAF still exists in a fragile state. It is equipped with Gripen fighter-bombers, which seldom fly because of financial, personnel, maintenance and other problems.

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Cheetah Squadron medal groups and other related items are not common and I see advertisements for them only a few times each year. Men who served in Korea are dying out so their once active veteran's group may no longer exist. The majority of South Africans have little sympathy or interest in the pre-1994 military history of this country, so in time the subject will be remembered only in other parts of the world - a repeat of the Rhodesia/Zimbabwe experience.

Regards

Brett

PS 2 Squadron SAAF still exists in a fragile state. It is equipped with Gripen fighter-bombers, which seldom fly because of financial, personnel, maintenance and other problems.

I can only imagine the situation there, but have seen how it went in Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, which I hope never happens in S. Africa. I'm amazed at the price differences between S. African WWI and WWII items and sincerely feel that wonderful historical groups can be had for a fraction of the price of those from Britain, Canada, New Zealand and of course Australia where prices have skyrocketed. I can only hope that those who emigrated will continue to remember and appreciate S. Africa's contribution in the world wars and military history prior to '94.

All the best,

John

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Thanks for this. I've never seen this one before. Great images.

Best,

Hug

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The South African Korean War Medal, which was issued in 1953, was probably the last Union of South Africa medal to carry the crown and/or royal cypher. In an election in 1948, the Afrikaner Nationalists finally won the Boer War (1899-1902) and set about severing links with the British. The Korean War provided the Nationalists with an opportunity to openly demonstrate their disregard for the United Nations in general and Britain in particular. By committing only one SAAF squadron, South Africa contributed far less to the UN effort than Canada, Australia and New Zealand. After the war, the Queen's Korea Medal was rejected and SA's own medal was instituted instead.

Another significant change that took place during the Korean War was the replacement of British-inspired uniforms, badges and other insignia with new designs, with some (e.g. NCO chevrons) reminiscent of Nazi patterns. (During WWII, Hitler had some very enthusiastic followers in SA.) Most of the initial draft of 2 Squadron SAAF personnel sent to Korea were WWII veterans wearing WWII-style uniforms and accessories. As the war progressed, the uniforms and accessories changed to become more distinctly South African and WWII veterans were replaced by post-war trained personnel. The transformation of South Africa into a short-lived Afrikaner Nationalist paradise was completed in 1960 when the country left the Commonwealth.

Since 2 Squadron was attached to the US 18th Fighter-Bomber Group, some American-influenced changes also took place. One was the adoption of a distinctive shoulder patch, similar to those worn by men in US Squadrons. The first 2 Squadron patch was made with silk thread by Korean women seamstresses/laundresses. Patches in all shapes and sizes later became a feature of the SAAF.

The display below shows some of the badges etc referred to above.

Brett

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Turkish UN Medal (with red ribbon) and veteran's badge. The traditional UN blue and white ribbon was swapped out by some Turks as those are the national colors of Greece.

14,936 Turks served in Korea.

Edited by azyeoman

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France - only 3,763 men servied with 280 killed, 1,008 wounded, 12 PoWs and 7 missing.

Edited by azyeoman

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I have the same French medals, but mine were purchased separately and did not belong to one individual.

Regards

Brett

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Great photo of the Glosters wearing the above shoulder sleeve insignia; referred to affectionately by many as the frozen A$$hole.

Edited by azyeoman

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These are the medals of a friend, who has died some 30 years ago. He served as a Leading Stoker in Korea, in the Frigate Hr.Ms. Johan Maurits van Nassau, and he was pensioned a Naval Lieutenant (E).

His medals are:

Silver Medal of the Order of Oranje-Nassau, with swords (for Military Service)

Cross for Justice and Freedom (with clasp Korea 1950)

Cross of New Guinea (with clasp 1962)

Naval Long Service Medal in Silver

UNSM (Dutch issue)

Korean War Medal

Edited by Odulf

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Beautiful group; wish I had it. ; ) Thanks for posting and all the best.

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Very nice collection! The Korea-period Van Heutsz cap badge is particularly good!

Just one thing though - the Royale 22e R. shoulder title is a 1960s' varient and should be in felt rather than US style embroidery. Is the UN medal with the Glosters' title real? Perhaps it is just the photograph, but it looks rather like the much later replacements.

Good collection though!

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The Gloster's titles are a real matching pair and the 22e titles are a matching pair with embroidery on felt.

Thanks, I'm glad you like it.

Edited by azyeoman

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Korean Veterans Association Canada medals and blazer badges.

L to R: pair - Five Year Service Medal and Merit Medal. Single - Five Year Service Medal and ten year clasp.

For more information on the medals go to:

http://www.kvacanada.com/ha_kva.htm

Edited by azyeoman

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A Canadian PPCLI Korean War Veteran wearing his official full-size medals on his left breast and his full-size Korean Veterans Association of Canada medal bar on his right breast.

Edited by azyeoman

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A nice thread with lots of history. But no Swedish groups... :speechless1: So here is one of my newer addition to my korean war collection: a Old Comrades Alliance of the Swedish Ambulance Cross of Rememberence and Merit. It was first awarded in 1954 and is pretty hard to find. This is one of two I have seen since collecting medals for some odd twenty years. Not exactly a group but it comes together with the member pin of the society. Probably recycled as the cross center.

/Kim

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Thanks for posting this Kimj. I've never seen one before; they must be rare as I don't believe there were many Swedes in Korea.

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I don't have the exact number, but I think it's about 1 000 who served at the hospital Sweden sent. Less than that organized in the society and fewer that got a cross.

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