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Cheers fellas,

I was given this bayonet/scabbard some time ago. The people who gave it to me were given it in the Netherlands. I'm trying to find out any further information on it.

Thanks!

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This is the British 1907 pattern Lee Enfield bayonet. This particular one was first issued in September 1912. The X shows that it

was sold out of service - probably after the end of WW1.

Your machete shows the country of origin - but appears to be based on the US pattern. Mervyn

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Gentlemen, thank you very much for the info! Thanks to you, I finally know what they are.

Edited by Aurelius

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I think the X mark on the bayonet is the bend proof test mark, the sold out of service mark is very similar, the only difference is the X has a line going through the middle from top to bottom.

On rifles the OA mark is for the manufacturer Orange Australia, I don't know if it's the same for bayonets or even if OA manufactured bayonets but the RE stamp is for Remington, maybe the scabbard, if it was originally made by Orange, was repaired at some stage with whatever parts were to hand. If it was made for and used by Commonwealth troops it would have a similar mark to the one Chris showed above depending on the country of manufacture - I think.

The opposite side of the pommel may sometimes show unit markings which I believe could be the mark C 74250 although I have no idea which unit, Cheshire Regt. maybe? The number would have corresponded with a rifle number.

Tony

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I've just checked one of my books, it doesn't mention a unit stamp with the letter C alone, but it does say the Cheshires unit stamp was CH. I also had a look online and found the Orange factory in NSW didn't start manufacturing until the 1940s although my book mentions OA is a Great War rifle and bayonet marking.

Tony

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O wonder what the SLAZ43 on the handle is? refurbished by Slazenger ;-)

The ones reissued to the South African police had SAP.

My only one with stamping in the same place as the C 74250 is an RAF one from (I assume) between the wars....

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This is an Australian bayonet.

XOA = a bend test (X) by the manufacturer at Orange (OA)

SLAZ = Slazenger and is only found on the wooden grips.

The "C" marking is, I believe, only an accountability number (production run numbering) but I stand to be corrected on that.

I have never run onto any indication that the bayonet number corrisponds with a rifle number as in Japanese swords and their scabbards of the WWII period. Again I stand to be corrected as my information is dated and my memory is for from infallible.

Regards

Brian

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I see there is no CROWN GR stamp, so maybe it is Australian. I'm not too sure about the date stamp on it either. A Pattern 1907 bayonet produced in 1912 wouldn't have an oiling hole at the pommel. The production stamps on Australian-made Vickers Guns is MA, and I notice the bayonet has this also. Does the scabbard have a serial number which matches that on the pommel?

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My own P07 bayonet is 11 14 and has no oiler hole. Prior to this date the bayonet also had the quillion, which was later removed. This particular pattern then became known as the P07 (Quillion removed). I am unsure if the oiler hole was then fitted retrospectively. But I have personally never seen any 1914 or earlier with the hole. Maybe for Australian manufactured bayonets it was different.

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Here a little more information which may be verified in the book "Australian Service Bayonets" by Ian D. Skennerton.

The earlier specimens had no cleaning hole in the pommel while all the ones made later had them.

MA is a mark indicating that it was manufactured in Australia.

The markings on the ricasso look to be "9 42" which would indicate a manifacturing date of September (the number 9) 1942, or are my old eyes failing me? There is mention of 1912, which is why I am asking this question regarding the manufacturing date.

These were used throughout WWII by the Australian troops with the S.M.L.E. rifle.

Regards

Brian

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We read wrong... mea culpa.... it is not September (19)12.... on the blade, but september 1942.

I think blade 1942, handle 1943... and australian....

Brians old eyes are better than mine.....

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Hi Tony,

Interesting specimen shown in the link.

I have never run onto the MANGROVITE spamping on the scabbard before, though I was aware they were maked this way.

Of course here in Canada we saw mostly Canadian and British examples for sale. Back in the 1960's there were going for .99 cents each and you had the pick of the "crop".

Regards

Brian

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Gentlemen, thank you again for all the info. I did find a marking on the scabbard.

You fellas are indeed experts on these. As for me, my focus is elsewhere and there is no point in the bayonet remaining in my closet. It should be in the hands of someone who can appreciate it. If you are interested, it is on Canadian Ebay but only for Canadians. International shipping with tracking capability is ultra expensive. This isn't a sales pitch but just to let you know it is there if you are interested.

Thanks again!

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