Jump to content
Gentleman's Military Interest Club
Antonio Prieto

Nigeria Medal list

Recommended Posts

I like the cross.  And, I'm sure, the resemblance to a much more prestigious British award is purely coincidental.  Both fine looking medlas, in fact  but a shame the designers couldn't have come up with a more original and interesting ribbon design!

Several decades ago the school I was at in northern Nigeria was visited by the then head of state and the principal spent a pile of naira on paint, which he then gave out freely to the senior prefects.  By the day of the visit everything in sight including some of the slower moving junior students was decorated in green and white stripes, and it was months before it wore off the trees, rocks and buildings!  Blah!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Gentlemen,

About 3 Years ago, I had shown here a Nigeria Independence Medal (but one of the very early striking with medal struck separately from suspension). Ribbon charts refer also to another ribbon for the Independence Medal (sand yellow ith a tri-coloured central stripe orange, dark bleu, sky bleu). I recently purchased parts of the collection of an old friend, that had passed away 6 months ago.

So here is the Independence Medal of Nigeria with Civil Issue ribbon. it's a different striking of the medal, but it's NOT a recent one.

The medal is thick : 3,5 millimeters, with a  diameter of 36 millimeters.

I post a photo side by side with the Independence Medal (with military ribbon).

That Civil Issue ribbon, I never saw it before, nowhere (except in ribbon chart).

If anyone has a photo of any official from Nigeria wearing this Civil Issue ribbon, that would helps, or photo from the independence Celebration.

Regards.

    Emmanuel

Nigeria Independence Medal Civil Issue obverse.jpg

Nigeria Independence Medal Civil Issue reverse.jpg

Nigeria Independence Medal Civil & Military Issue obverse.jpg

Edited by heusy68

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fascinating... thank you for sharing.

So, is it your opinion that the coat of arms is the reverse, and the map/legend the obverse?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can answer that, megan, having lived in Nigeria once.  Yes, the coat of arms is the obverse.  

I once spent an Independence day talking to Nigerian army officers, many of whom were wearing the medal.  I wanted to talk about the Ngerian Army, they wanted to talkm about the good bars in Fort Knox, Kentucky, where they'd done armour training. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

I agree with you. Obverse side is the side with Coat of Arms, just that Civil Issue was "mounted" such a way, and long time ago.

Just for fun I will ounce buy on eBay a cheap and current issue Nigeria Independence, and then post them side by side. You will then see the difference. The quality of nowday is poor, the quality of the older medal shows crips détails, and that is something collector like.

Not so much amazed nigerian general are (were) more interested by drinking beer, rather than by their jobs............

    Emmanuel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Operation Zaman Lafiya Medal

The 27 Task Force Brigade of the Nigeria Army in Yobe State, north-east Nigeria, has honoured its officers and men for their gallantry in the fight against the Boko Haram terrorists.

 

At a ‘Medal Parade’ in Damaturu, the Yobe State capital, all the officers and men involved in the operation “Zaman Lafiya” for a period of six months, were honoured with the medals.

Another category of the awards is the Nigerian Army Purple Heart Medal Award meant for those killed or injured while in active service.

At the ceremony in Damaturu, the State Governor, Ibrahim Gaidam, applauded the officers and men for giving their all, for the restoration of peace and stability in the troubled state.

 

Source: https://www.channelstv.com/2015/06/20/nigerian-army-honours-officers-in-yobe/

images81VZNU8Q.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

'OPERATION ZAMAN LAFIYA' is bugging the heck out of me! 

My very very rusty Hausa vocabulary and the use of several Hausa English dictionaries suggest that this phrase translates as either

           'zama' [to be] & 'lafiya' [happy, well] with the 'n' on 'zaman' being a grammatical form which connects the two words

OR

          'zaman' [war/conflict] & 'lafiya' [happy, well]. 

Lafiya is a common greeting  in Hausa common greeting in answer to a series of formal questions: 'How is your work? Lafiya.  'How is your tiredness?' Lafiya. etc.

So, it seems to translate as 'Operation Happy War' or 'Operation Being Happy/ Happiness'.  Which seems to suggest that the Nigerian federal army, like many others, has a department devoted to producing silly and undignified code names for military operations!

I can't say I care much for the colour scheme on the medal either, but thanks very much for sharing it, Antonio. 

Edited by peter monahan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. Unfortunatelly I dont see any of the named "Nigerian Army Purple Heart Medal Award"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 20/08/2018 at 06:50, BalkanCollector said:

First time seeing Nigerian awards. I see they are greatly influenced by the UK.

Yes, part of the relics of colonialism, though when I was there in the early '80s mosty of the Army officers I met had trained in the US - many at Ft Knox.  I suspect, thought I've never checked, that early post-independence medals and awards were designed and struck in the UK and certainly the rank structure and so on mimc the British, as do most Commonwealth forces.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, peter monahan said:

Yes, part of the relics of colonialism, though when I was there in the early '80s mosty of the Army officers I met had trained in the US - many at Ft Knox.  I suspect, thought I've never checked, that early post-independence medals and awards were designed and struck in the UK and certainly the rank structure and so on mimc the British, as do most Commonwealth forces.  

Interesting information, thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×