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Gentleman's Military Interest Club
mravery

Gentlemen at arms swords and uniforms

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Hello all,

I have a few questions to query the group....

1) what pattern swords did the Gentlemen at Arms carry ?

2) does anyone have any pictures of the GaA's in parade uniform that they can post.... 1900-1945 period ?

Cheers and thanks !

Mark

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i've just done a little search and found this on the monarchy today site

"The uniform is that of a Heavy Dragoon Guards officer of the 1840s. It has a skirted red coat with Garter blue velvet cuffs and facings embroidered with the Tudor royal badge of the Portcullis. Helmets with white swan feather plumes are worn when on duty, even in church. Officers wear gold aiguillettes and carry sticks of office which they receive from the Sovereign on appointment. Cavalry swords are worn, and long ceremonial battle-axes, over 300 years old, are carried by all the Gentlemen."

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i've just done a little search and found this on the monarchy today site

"The uniform is that of a Heavy Dragoon Guards officer of the 1840s. It has a skirted red coat with Garter blue velvet cuffs and facings embroidered with the Tudor royal badge of the Portcullis. Helmets with white swan feather plumes are worn when on duty, even in church. Officers wear gold aiguillettes and carry sticks of office which they receive from the Sovereign on appointment. Cavalry swords are worn, and long ceremonial battle-axes, over 300 years old, are carried by all the Gentlemen."

Harribobs,

This is great info.. thank you very much...... I was curious about the swords but it sounds like just a standard Cavalry sword.

Another question...... Would the GaA's be considered a 'Military' unit... or more of a Civil group ?

Cheers

Mark

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Hey Bob,

Here is the definition from the web:

Her Majesty's Body Guard of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms - the Sovereign's nearest Guard - was instituted by King Henry VIII in 1509. However, until 17 March 1834 they were originally known as The Honourable Band of Gentlemen Pensioners. Henry decided to have 'this new and sumptuous Troop of Gentlemen composed of cadets of noble families and the highest order of gentry', as his personal Body Guard. As his Body Guard it accompanied Henry to France in 1513 and took part in the Battle of Guinegate or better known as the Battle of the Spurs and in 1520 attended The King at the Field of the Cloth of Gold.

Except for the Yeomen of the Queen's Body Guard of the Yeomen of the Guard and the Sergeants-at-Arms, the Gentlemen-at-Arms are the oldest corps in England. At the time that the Body Guard began conducting their duties on foot in Court, as well as mounted in the field, the carried the Battle Axe when in Chamber service.

Today the Honourable Corps consist of 5 Officers and 27 Gentlemen, all of whom, with the exception of the Captain, have to be retired Officers of the Army or the Royal Marines. All members of the Corps are members of the Royal Household. The Officers are promoted from amongst the Gentlemen and receive Sticks of Office from the hand of the Sovereign on appointment. Their normal duties include attendance at all State Occasions and Services of the Great Orders of Chivalry. The Corps has its headquarter in St James' Palace. This is the immediate charge of the 'Axe-Keeper and Butler' whose primary duty is to look after the battle axes which are still carried by the Gentlemen on duty.

Cheers

Mark

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