Jock Auld

Wilkinson 1907 bayonet with foriegn markings?

11 posts in this topic

Guys,

One for the friendly forces!

Got this today nothing fancy but then I noticed the markings, I think Arabic?

I suppose we have always been selling weapons abroad!

The wood does not look like it is original perhaps replaced by the new country?

Anyone any idea?

Cheers!

Jock :)

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Jock - The Wilkinson 1907 pattern was first issued in August 1915 - according to the stamps. On the reverse it shows

the Broad Arrow of the Board of Ordnance - showing it was British issue. The X shows that it was sold out of service.

The arabic stamp is for the Country that made the purchase. Perhaps Jordan - since there is a J in the stamp , however,

it needs an arabic reader to help. Mervyn

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Mervyn,

Thanks for the info, seems quite a gap from the pattern to being in service, never knew that.

Cheers

Jock :)

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Jock - badly worded on my part. The bayonet came into immediate use after it was adopted in 1907. However, this

particular example was not issued until August 1915.

I expect it remained in British use until after 1918 when enormous numbers were sold out of service. General Allenby's

Mesopotamia Campaign had brought many Arab countries under our influence and I expect we sold - or, gave them

rifles and bayonets. The Arab Legion under Glubb Pasha was set-up in Jordan - it would be great to have one from that

famous unit. Mervyn

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Mervyn,

Thanks for setting that straight, I should have realised!

Cheers

Jock :)

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You ought to see how many P1907's I have seen over the years in Afghanistan. Some has similar numeric numbers like the one you showed, but smaller font size.

I purchased about 75 of the better condition P1907. Most were English, some Indian and no Australian one seen there. There were also plenty of P1888, P1903 and, P1913 back then.

Recently, you would be lucky to see a poor condition bayonet at the local bazaar.

v/r

Dat Nguyen

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Oh a clarification ... The X on the blade indicate that it successfully passed a 'bend test'. The symbol used to indicate sold out of service is a large asterisk *

v/r

Dat Nguyen

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Dat,

Thanks for the info, I didn't get outside the wire as a civilian, did you see any M18 cav helmets as they were there too?

Jock :)

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Cabart - interesting - but then the British have been fighting in Afghanistan since the 1840's. The difficulty with buying them is the transport - at present they are worth about 50 pounds each and upwards if special or, in very good condition.

The X mark on the Ricasso is held to be for re-issue. This would mean sold out of service for re-issue to another country.

This would tie in with the marks on Jock's bayonet - which I now think was for Egypt. Best wishes Mervyn

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Hello Mr. Mitton,

I am not certain of the forum's rules on posting a link to another site so I sent you a private message in regards to markings on UK bayonets. Collecting bayonets is one of my recents hobbies and every reference site that I've seen list X as the marking for the bend test. I was very fortunate to send back most of my bayonets for free using the military postal system. Some of my aircrew friends also took them back if there were available space and weight on the plane.

@ Jock

Most of the M18 helmets were gone when I got there in 2005. The ones left were fair to very poor conditions. I have two myself. Almost all of these Afghan helmets will have three holes punched on the right side of the helmet to attach a round badge. I have also seen some very clever Afghans modifying these helmets to look like the M-18 cut out helmet. They would cut the rim off then try to weld a fabricated seam back on the cut out. Their workmanship is very rough and the heat from welding basically destroy a good helmet.

v/r

Dat Nguyen

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Dat - I hope that I have that right as your first name ? I received the IM and thankyou for taking the trouble.

After your query on the 'X' , I went a little more deeply into the stamp and it did appear that most researchers thought

it was for re-issue. This was particularly so with the 1907. We have learnt - over the years - to never be close

minded , we learn new things with every post. I am very happy to accept that this is for a 'bend test' - however,

it would then appear on every bayonet - and not just on selected ones.............

Hopefully , other members will give us their opinions ? Meanwhile , thankyou for being so polite and calling me MR.

- however, I like to think that was my Father - who would now be 104 !

I think I speak for the Membership, when I say we would be very interested to hear about your experiences in Afghanistan. Mervyn

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