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SimonLMoore

Police Uniform Illustrations **RECOMMENDED

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Hey chaps, I'm sharing a couple of illustrations here which I have produced based upon research using old photographs, and scraps from regulations where I could find them. These may not be perfect but I am hoping with collective input to make these into useful online references for those starting out with an interest in British Police uniforms, other periods and other forces may be covered if people can provide information!

These images are quite easily edited and I am posting them with the intention of updating them as more details come to light, hopefully forum members will be able to help and also point out any errors I have made.

With regards to these first two I am particularly interested in confirmation/correction of dates, details on any dress uniform for Met Inspectors (supposedly similar to the Super's uniform?) and in addition details of more senior officers in the City Police and any dress uniform Inspectors may have worn.

met_police_uniforms_by_simonlmoore-d7xem

city_police_uniforms_by_simonlmoore-d7xe

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Excellent!

Only one thing that I think should be added, is the whistle chain.

Attached is a photo. May be a bit later but shows how the whistle should be worn.

Zeb

Extract from Police Orders. Wed, May 25th 1887

Whistles. -1. Whistles are to be carried by Police at all times when on duty, and in the following manner.
2. The hook is to be fastened in the second button-hole from the top of the tunic or great coat and whistle placed between the buttons, the chain to hang nearly straight on the outside of the garment (and then the whistle should be tucked in) .

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Many thanks!

I'll definitely add the chain, the Met Police timeline has a note that they were to be used in place of rattles on day patrol from 1885 (Police Order 10th February 1885) with the rattle finally replaced entirely with Police Order you quoted above. If this checks out I'll add it as a note to the finished illustration.

I am guessing the City Police introduced whistles at a similar time? I've seen City Sergeants and Constables wearing them in exactly the same manner in photographs but not Inspectors...

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From this photograph (even though uniform in 1930s) I think the City Police wore a silver chain as well??

I have also found a photo of an Inspector's dress uniform from the City police.

This is a very good website about City Police Uniform and Equipment.

Zeb

http://citypolice.tripod.com/CityofLondonUniforms.htmhttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-17014-0-36872000-1409556219.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-17014-0-84113000-1409556228.jpg

Edited by MetPolice

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As far as I am aware the City of London Police had brass chains at the time, though whistles were made in both white metal and brass, as I understand it and from examples I've seen even the buckles of the duty arm bands were in brass.

mfbELjJH-lMKnrApo292sHA.jpg

I have used that website to garner some of the information for the illustration but the owner seems to have stopped updating it some time ago and the contact email is sadly broken. The Inspector's dress uniform is beautiful but the shoulder rank and use of two pips dates it as a fairly modern piece compared to the illustrations I'm working on. It is certainly similar to what I have been informed existed for Metropolitan Police Inspectors in the late 1800s and I am guessing for City Police Inspectors too by way of dress uniform but I need more solid information before committing it to the illustrations. It is based upon the British Army patrol jacket which was officially introduced in 1867 so I assume Police use would not pre-date this.

I'll certainly have a closer look at those group photographs, I don't suppose you have larger, clearer versions or know the origin so I might try and track down some clearer copies?

Edited by SimonLMoore

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Simon - Brian and I would like to congratulate you on a well thought out project - and one that will help to settle many

outstanding questions on uniforms and dates. Mervyn

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Many thanks indeed, I hope it's accurate, or getting there, a lot of the information used was found online which can be a bit risky...

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From this photograph (even though uniform in 1930s) I think the City Police wore a silver chain as well??

I have also found a photo of an Inspector's dress uniform from the City police.

This is a very good website about City Police Uniform and Equipment.

Zeb

http://citypolice.tripod.com/CityofLondonUniforms.htmattachicon.gifuniform4.jpgattachicon.giffig.73.JPG

The City Police have never worn chrome fittings on their uniforms. They were either brass (pre. c.1970) or gold anodised (post c. 1970). This is notwithstanding the chrome chain shown in the photo.

Dave.

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Hey chaps, I'm sharing a couple of illustrations here which I have produced based upon research using old photographs, and scraps from regulations where I could find them. These may not be perfect but I am hoping with collective input to make these into useful online references for those starting out with an interest in British Police uniforms, other periods and other forces may be covered if people can provide information!

These images are quite easily edited and I am posting them with the intention of updating them as more details come to light, hopefully forum members will be able to help and also point out any errors I have made.

With regards to these first two I am particularly interested in confirmation/correction of dates, details on any dress uniform for Met Inspectors (supposedly similar to the Super's uniform?) and in addition details of more senior officers in the City Police and any dress uniform Inspectors may have worn.

met_police_uniforms_by_simonlmoore-d7xem

city_police_uniforms_by_simonlmoore-d7xe

Senior Officers in the City Police when wearing No:-1 uniform did not wear external sword belts. Canvas belts were worn beneath the tunic with the sword suspended on a hook attached to the concealed belt , the hook being accessed through a "slit" in the left side of the tunic.

Dave.

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Imagine the fun our great-great grandsons will have pouring over the finer points of wicking t-shirts and hi-viz fleeces circa 2014. :cheeky:

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The City Police have never worn chrome fittings on their uniforms. They were either brass (pre. c.1970) or gold anodised (post c. 1970). This is notwithstanding the chrome chain shown in the photo.

Dave.

Dave,

Thanks for clearing that point up !!

Nick,

Imagine the fun our great-great grandsons will have pouring over the finer points of wicking t-shirts and hi-viz fleeces circa 2014

Indeed!

Zeb

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Senior Officers in the City Police when wearing No:-1 uniform did not wear external sword belts. Canvas belts were worn beneath the tunic with the sword suspended on a hook attached to the concealed belt , the hook being accessed through a "slit" in the left side of the tunic.

Dave.

Hi Dave, I didn't believe these to be No. 1 tunics but every day uniform, attached is a photo clearly showing a snake buckle belt being worn with the tunic which is what I was working from. I agree when seen wearing the corded 'patrol jacket' style uniform sword belts aren't worn externally.

I've also attached a photo supposedly from 1902 which I think shows a Chief Inspector (judging from the amount of gold apparent on the helmet plate) which I am guessing is the No. 1 uniform of the time but I need more information before illustrating it for either City or Met Police.

More info would be much appreciated if you can help!

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The picture on the left has a City of London Sgt. on the left.. The inspectors seem to have different cap badges - perhaps

a joint policing event ?

The one on the right is all City Police. The very height of the two in the front rank indicates that. Min. height used to be 6 feet.

The tallest City constable that I knew was 7feet 8 inches. He traveled in their van and no-one ever argued with him.

The little man on the left with a silk top hat , is probably either a City Alderman - or, an official from one of the Guilds. The

man in uniform on his left , would be a Beadle and his escort.

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The picture on the left has a City of London Sgt. on the left.. The inspectors seem to have different cap badges - perhaps

a joint policing event ?

The one on the right is all City Police. The very height of the two in the front rank indicates that. Min. height used to be 6 feet.

The tallest City constable that I knew was 7feet 8 inches. He traveled in their van and no-one ever argued with him.

The little man on the left with a silk top hat , is probably either a City Alderman - or, an official from one of the Guilds. The

man in uniform on his left , would be a Beadle and his escort.

Hi Mervyn, the cap badges are for the City Police; the shield from the centre of the City of London crest, bearing a St George's cross and a sword in the top left corner, clearer photos attached. I believe the Superintendent (cap badge with a wreath) is Foster, as labelled in the previous group image.

Thanks for the information on the height regulations. I've seen a superb photo of a county Policeman of 5' 8" stood with a City colleague of 6' 8", an amusing contrast.

Edited by SimonLMoore

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http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-6209-0-40377900-1410000938.jpgclick

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-6209-0-86140800-1410001086.jpgclick

These are two informative drawings, made by Bob Marrion - the 'H' Division plan drawer in 1974.

I have shown them in the past - but, this seems a good time to repeat them. They are accurate

and drawn as illustrations for the booklet for the first Police Exhibition ever held by the Met. Police - this

was in 1974. My Home Beat had a wonderful hall above the Regency period local library. I put

forward a suggestion that we have an exhibition - "The Police and the East End of London" . It had

great publicity and many people loaned exhibits - we had over 30,000 visitors and schools bussed

their pupils-in. We had a formal lunch at Bethnal Green station - in our basement - the guest of honour

Bishop Huddleston, The Commissioner, Dep. Comm, and all 4 Asst. Comms. attended and then

visited the exhibition - which was extended to 5 weeks.

The top picture shows an H Division constable in about 1840. He is wearing the frock coat - in which

the rattle was in a tail pocket. His top hat - trimmed with leather - is the first issue . Later it was made

shorter. His leather stock was 4 inches high. Very uncomfortable it was later reduced to 2 inches and

remained in use until the change to a tunic. The main purpose was that in 1829 the cult of Thuggees

was very active in India - they threw a silk scarf with a coin tied at the strike end. This would be

thrown to go around the neck and the victim choked to death. They feared this would be copied in England and so, the collar. However, it did have another use - it kept the undershirt clean.

The second picture shows the new 'Berlin' Tunic and trousers - his helmet is the new design with the

up-turned brim. Very few pictures exist of this helmet - and as I understand not a single example

exists. This will date to the early 1860's as the Met. adopted the pattern ahead of other Forces.

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Very nice illustrations Mervyn, thanks for sharing along with all the information! I had read about your exhibition elsewhere on the forum but I hadn't seen these.

Very interesting to read that the stock was prompted by the notoriety of the Thuggees though I understand it remained in service long after the tunic was introduced, only being reduced to two inches in 1859 and not abolished until 1880.

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Simon - in my book I show the leather stock being reduced to 2 inches in 1845 - and being phased out in 1875.

I also show the leather truncheon case - worn on the left side, hanging from the belt - being discontinued in 1887.

From this point the extra linen pocket was sewn into the trousers,immediately behind the normal right pocket. Mervyn

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Simon - in my book I show the leather stock being reduced to 2 inches in 1845 - and being phased out in 1875.

I also show the leather truncheon case - worn on the left side, hanging from the belt - being discontinued in 1887.

From this point the extra linen pocket was sewn into the trousers,immediately behind the normal right pocket. Mervyn

Interesting Mervyn, I'll get in touch with the Metropolitan Police HIstorical Society as their timeline gives the dates I quoted in my post above, no conflict on the withdrawal of the truncheon case though I've read that elsewhere too.

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http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-6209-0-44750900-1410429837.jpgclick

City of London Police Constable Parsons. 1850

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-6209-0-53333300-1410430076.jpgclick

This is shown in Rumbelow's book as a City of London

Constable prior to 1865. However, one of our distinguished

members has spotted that it is in fact an early Liverpool

Borough Police Constable. The book was published in 1974,

so, I am sure the mistake has been pointed out to him before.

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http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-6209-0-05054200-1410430295.jpgclick

This early picture of a City of London Constable shows the new

pattern of Helmet, started by the Metropolitan Police. The brim is

up-turned. When these were discontinued the C of L adopted

adopted the style with a cox comb. The City adopted this helmet

in 1865 - but the picture is later as it shows the shortened tunic.

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-6209-0-38352200-1410430793.jpgclick

201a Bishopsgate in 1867. It was the original Watchhouse and

later it became Bishopsgate Police Station. With the number of

Police upstairs and standing outside, I wonder if it was still acting

as a rest area ?

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I promised Simon that I would add some C of L early ref. pictures. These are from an excellent

book on the City of London Policing history - covering events from the earliest days. I knew

Donald Rumbelow when he was the Curator of the City Police Museum - he was a noted expert

on "Jack the Ripper". Since there are few books with this depth of knowledge , I am happy to give

details.

Published 1974. Donald Rumbelow. I SPY BLUE. ISBN 0 85997 011 6

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_09_2014/post-6209-0-52430700-1410431523.jpgclick

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attachicon.gif019.JPGclick

City of London Police Constable Parsons. 1850

attachicon.gif020.JPGclick

City of London Police Constables' Uniform Prior to 1865

Mervyn,

Your annexed photo which you caption "City of London Constables Uniform Prior to 1865" is unfortunately incorrect. It actually shows a Liverpool Borough Constable. The City of London Police have never worn a belt plate, in addition you can see the Liver bird badges on his collar. Finally, the photo is one which appears regularly in publications dealing with the early history of Liverpool City Police. I hope this is helpful.

Dave.

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