Chris Boonzaier

The most noble regiment of Christendom

51 posts in this topic

Known as the "vornehmstes Regiment der Christenheit" the 1. Garde-Regiment zu Fuss was part of the elite 1st garde Division.... Here are 2 groups to Vizefeldwebel in the III. Batl.

Vizefeldwebel Wilhelm Flottmann

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Unfortunately missing his other awards and EK2 document...

 

Now Vizefeldwebel Neumeyer.... 9. Komp.

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Hello Chris.

Stunning series all belonging to members of this regiment incl. V.Fw. Wilhelm Flottmann, who received the Golden Military Merit Cross. Excellent find and causing envy at this end.

It seems to me as if someone established a small collection of documents etc belonging to former members of this regiment. And you were the lucky one...

Thanks for showing .

Bernhard H. Holst

 

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Hi,

 

I had the 2 EK2 docs shown last.... then was lucky enough to get the Flottmann group.... then by chance found I had the Neumeyer group in a drawer, had forgotten that I had it .... so by default it now becomes one of the regiments i am going to actively keep an eye open for ;-)

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Hi,

I think it probably was, but I do not find any proof that it still exists...

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Too bad.  One of the more impressive monuments I've seen...  I wonder if the barracks exists...

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.... then by chance found I had the Neumeyer group in a drawer, had forgotten that I had it .... so by default it now becomes one of the regiments i am going to actively keep an eye open for ;-)

Great documents, Chris and the new, accidental concentration is priceless.

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Nice!

How do we tell the difference between the different Foot Guard regiments?

Any chance that Neumeyer or Flottmann are on the group Photo`?

 

Best

Chris

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To show the social value of this regiment... all Prussian Princes were named Leutnant in the regiment on their 10th birthdays...

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Nice!

How do we tell the difference between the different Foot Guard regiments?

Any chance that Neumeyer or Flottmann are on the group Photo`?

 

Best

Chris

​Hi Chris!

Unfortunately none of them is on the photo with the names. The Reservistenbild is from 1903

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It was. Dedicated in June 1924, it was situated south east of the site of the former garrison church on Breitestraße. The monument survived the war but was dismantled/destroyed in 1946 on orders of the communist memorial commisson.

Regards

Glenn

 

 

 

 

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Hello.

Thanks for all the additional information and pictures.

I would like to add this:

- this regiment was formed in 1688 thus took precedence over all other regiments;

- the regiment had the highest officers' loss in killed, died of wounds and missing of any regiment during WW I.

The monument is of special interest as it incorporates one of Fredrick's the Great grenadiers and a WW I soldier grasping each others hand, the latter seemingly looking up at  the image of King Fredrick.

Bernhard H. Holst

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The monument is of special interest as it incorporates one of Fredrick's the Great grenadiers and a WW I soldier grasping each others hand, the latter seemingly looking up at  the image of King Fredrick.

Bernhard H. Holst

That's why I asked about its location.  I've been to Potsdam - both before and after the Wall came down - and never remember seeing it in town or out at Sans Souci.  I would've taken a trip out there next time in Berlin if it still existed.  One of the most impressive WWI regimental monuments.  Too bad it's gone.

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Hello readers.

It may be of additional interest that presently the Bundeswehr is guarding the tradition of this, the oldest regiment of the former Prussian Army. Since the upholding of traditions of any former German military formation by the Bundeswehr was forbidden by law as of the early 1980's only the protest by the then Federal President Richard v. Weizaecker ( who recently died ) could the guarding of the tradition be assumed by the Bundeswehr Wachbtaillon on an exemption basis.

Note: before 1945 the tradition was guarded by Infanterie Regiment 9 also garrisoned in Potsdam. The former President v. Weizaecker served in this regiment during WW II.

Bernhard H. Holst

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That's why I asked about its location.  I've been to Potsdam - both before and after the Wall came down - and never remember seeing it in town or out at Sans Souci.  I would've taken a trip out there next time in Berlin if it still existed.  One of the most impressive WWI regimental monuments.  Too bad it's gone.

​How did you go to Potsdam before the Wall came down if I may ask? 

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How do we tell the difference between the different Foot Guard regiments?

Chris

​In the feldgrau era (1907-1918) the best indicator was the shoulder straps, which were plain with various regimental piping colors. For the M1907 tunic, the first regiment had nickel buttons while the 2, 3, 4 regiments had brass buttons. Other than those differences, the tunics were pretty much the same.

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