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I recently was fortunate enough to have picked up a beautiful M. 1905 3-line Klappenschrank (switchboard) so I figured the gear guys on this forum would appreciate some pretty pictures.  It's only missing the little flaps that fold down when a line is in use (or at least that's what I think they're for).  They're easily reproduced.  I thought I'd thrown in some shots of some of the other "M.1905" phones and an example of the Armeefernsprechbatterie alter Art...also a Model 1905.  The O.B.05 Tischapparat and the Klappenschrank were originally made for civilian/civil government use but they also so extensive use in the military as numerous period photos show.  Interestingly, both the O.B.05 and the Klappenschrank are dated and marked with the Imperial Crown.  The Klappenschrank has 1906 date and the O.B.05 has a 1916 date (the only wartime dated example I've seen).  The Klappenschrank also has a 1924 date.  I'm assuming these dates are associated with their "issue" or perhaps inspection?  The batteries in the fernsprechbatterie are all wartime dated.  As if all that isn't cool enough, the Feldfernsprecher alter Art (I also believe a "Model 1905) is actually unit-marked: F.F.K.3.A.G.  As near as I can tell, this stands for Festungs Fernsprech Kompagnie 3 Abteilung des Gardekorps: Fortress Telephone Company 3, Garde Corps.  Does this make sense?

Sorry the photos are mostly out of any logical order. 

I'd love to see other's communications gear!

1905Klapp2.jpg

1905Klapp3.jpg

AlterArt1.jpg

1905Klapp1.jpg

Edited by 120RIR
added info.

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Very interesting, thanks for sharing it.  What do the batteries look like in terms of lables, Is it possible to get them out for a look see?

Cheers

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The Klappenschrank O.B. 05 along with the Tischapparat O.B 05 indeed fall into the category of "Ziviles Nachrichtengerät mit militärischer Nutzung". Many were used for military purposes and, of course, many remained where they were before the war started and never saw military service. There were several other switchboards, hand sets and headphones of civilian origin that were used by the military, most notably the Streckenfernsprecher. This was a phone in a box, much akin to the Feldfernsprecher a.A, the Eiserner Feldfernsprecher, and the Feldfernsprecher 16.

I think that battery box is most likely a 1920s version. The three wartime models had three batteries each, but no extra compartments. Is there a zink identification tag on it?

Here are a couple of photos taken at the National WWI Museum of a mannequin with some of theirs and some of my telephone related equipment put together for the photos.

Telegraphensoldat1.thumb.JPG.66d2cbdcbb2Telegraphensoldat2.thumb.JPG.3776af842ff

 

Edited by Chip

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Hey Chip -

I believe the box shown (3 batteries with the additional compartment) is indeed of WWI vintage.  I'm quite sure I've got photos showing it in use (I'll dig them out later) plus Eric Siegel has it documented as the "Sprecherbatterie alter Art on his First War Technik web site.  Here's a photo of my Streckenfernsprecher...with a nice papercloth strap.  I have a particular fondness for my Sprechbatterie alter Art.  It's the first piece of communications gear I got and it sparked my interest in that type of gear. 

Streck3.jpg

Streck2.jpg

Streck1.jpg

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Brian,

My mistake. I did not have this model in my reference material and when you look a Siegel's site, he only has photos of one of the two patterns (a.A.). Could we see the connection configuration on the end of the box? Is the compartment on the left just for cord storage or is there something else in there?

Thanks,

Chip

Edited by Chip

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My pleasure Mr. Wolfe.  I'm sure it's the same with collectors of just about anything but at least for me sharing what I have and seeing what others have acquired is a big part of the fun.  Otherwise, I'd probably feel I'm just accumulating and could wind up on one of those TV shows about hoarders buried in crap and living with 50 cats (don't get me wrong...I'm a cat person).   Also, this forum and others are populated by guys who know a heck of a lot more than I do and it's a great learning experience.

Anyhow, per Jock Auld's and Chip's responses, I have attached some additional photos.  You guys must have some cool stuff to post too - let's see what y'all have in your toy rooms.

Cheers,

Brian 

Plug.jpg

Connect3.jpg

Connect2.jpg

Connect1.jpg

Batts.jpg

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More photos

OBO5b.jpg

OBO5a.jpgAlterArt2.jpg

I love that phone with the eagle. I would enjoy owning any of them to be honest

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Brian,

Thanks for the extra photos. That's a nice battery box!

If we get any sun tomorrow (it's rained every day for except for one the past week), I'll try to get some photos of some of my telephone equipment. Just for starters, here is a photo of my Aufspuler and specialty buckle.

07_15_0.JPEG

 

Edited by Chip

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Dear CCJ - these are actually fairly common and can usually be found in the collectible telephones category on German Ebay.  Many are post-war dated although I have seen plenty that are pre-war dated as well. 

Chip - yes, please do post some photos when you get a chance.  That's a great Aufspuler.  You don't need that - I'd be more than happy to take that junky old thing off your hands!

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My pleasure Mr. Wolfe.  I'm sure it's the same with collectors of just about anything but at least for me sharing what I have and seeing what others have acquired is a big part of the fun.  Otherwise, I'd probably feel I'm just accumulating and could wind up on one of those TV shows about hoarders buried in crap and living with 50 cats (don't get me wrong...I'm a cat person).   Also, this forum and others are populated by guys who know a heck of a lot more than I do and it's a great learning experience.

Anyhow, per Jock Auld's and Chip's responses, I have attached some additional photos.  You guys must have some cool stuff to post too - let's see what y'all have in your toy rooms.

Cheers,

Brian 

Plug.jpg

Connect3.jpg

Connect2.jpg

Connect1.jpg

Batts.jpg

​Brian,

Thank you for the extra pictures, those batteries must be like rocking horse dropping to find is such good order for their age,  I thought I did good yesterday with my TR phone and battery but you have given me something new to hunt for.

Cheers

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So far I've done well...with the exception of needing a single battery to complete the needed two contained within my Feldfernsprecher 16, all of the battery boxes and phones in my collection have these original batteries.  Just dumb luck.  It's pretty rare to see individual batteries for sale or for equipment to contain them so yes, they're really tough to get. 

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Brian if you use modern batteries your phones should still work, we had a pr of early US ones in our bunkers for a while.

Eric

P6013344.JPG

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Thanks Jock - nice photo actually packed with all kinds of details and interesting bits and pieces of gear once you take a moment to look.  I don't have an example of the Armeefernsprechbatterie Alter Art in my collection yet but I have attached some photos of a later version (the Feldfernsprechbatterie 17) and some of the other things pictured and a few that aren't.  The flashlights seem to be almost innumerable in their variety but from what I can see it's at least similar to one of the models I have posted here.  I assume these were all private-purchased?  Does anyone know if they were ever actually issued?  As for the phone gear - I have pictured an example of the Armeefernsprecher Alter Art and an accompanying case, a Kopffernhorer Alter Art, a nice 15-dated case and an example of the Ruftrompete.  Lastly, only the second example of a for-sure wartime Sicherheitsgurt...dated 1917 and maker-marked.  You can find similar examples on German eBay but since this exact design persisted for decades after WWI (and no doubt for decades prior) and it's really just a civilian piece of gear, there's no way to tell exactly when most of them were made or if they saw military use.  What's the material?  It looks like a very course canvas...is it hemp perhaps?

armeefernsprecher alter art.jpg

feldsprechbatterie 171.jpg

feldsprechbatterie 172.jpg

kopffernhorer alter art2.jpg

A few more shots - items referenced in my previous post.

lights.jpg

sicherheitsgurt1.jpg

sicherheitsgurt2.jpg

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120RIR,

I can see you are an enthusiastic collector of this type of hardware, if you want to have the card for your collection then let me know where to send it by PM. 

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Dante

I believe there is original footage of soldiers using this type of phone, even generals maybe Ludendorff barked into yours back when lol!

Eric

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