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saxcob

Yesterday at Waterloo...

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A huge re-enactment of the Battle of Waterloo took place in the same Belgian fields where Napoleon's army was defeated, 200 years ago.

Though I could not see a single of the 7.000 Nassauers, the allies managed to win without them.

See some pictures attached.

 

 

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The second to last picture shows Ensign Charles Ewart of the Royal North British Dragoons (Scots Greys) presenting the regimental eagle of the 45e Régiment de Ligne (45th Regiment of the Line) he captured.

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I wonder if there were any re-enactors representing the Hanoverian Brigades that served in the British Divisions?

Brett

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Saxcob   -  some lovely photos  -  thankyou so much for posting them.    I wonder where our member Peter Monahan was during the re-enactment  -  he is there to take part.  I thought some of the visitors should have been kept back from the troops  -  or used for bayonet practise....       The one thing I hadn't realised were how many people were taking part.      Mervyn

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Brett - not sure about the hanoverians, but I suspect yes.  There were all sorts of Allied units including a Swedish regiment - mostly composed of Finns in fact - in one of the Allied Brigades.  The North American Battalion, of which I had the honour to be an staff officer, was attached to the british 4th Brigade, which also had an attached BBC camerman, so an inordinate number of the shots aired on the BBC in fact showed Canadians, as well as the 2/95th Rifles, the 33rd Foot and the Coldstream Guards, who were brigaded with us.  As we also had the only Corps of Drums in the Allied force, they got their share of publcity as well and were employed virtually non-stop, both on and off the field.  Sadly, while I was present for the Friday night battle, I went down with food poisioning immediately afterwards and spent 24 hours sleeping, including through the Saturday battle.  A few phots attached below.   One of our officers and his son, the staff officers inside Hougomont Farm, where we were trapped for an hour by a broken ramp onto the filed, hand to hand combat, His grace the Duke and our Brigade commander, Rob Yuill, with his sone and his father [76] who here portrays their ancestor, a soldier of the Royal Scots.  He fell in with the RS in our battalion for the raining sesions.

Charlie.jpg

DSC00334.JPG

hand to hand.jpg

rearing horse.jpg

Wellington-sunday_3348527k.jpg

Yuills 3 generations.jpg

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Peter

Thank you for replying to my enquiry.  The re-enactment was most impressive and you are fortunate to have been present.  Apart from your indisposition, it must have been an unforgettable experience.

I recently discovered that my ancestors on my mother's side were Hanoverians, hence my interest in these people.  There has been a lot to learn and, of course, I have been concentrating on their military history.

Regards

Brett 

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Brett

I'll see if I can find the British order of battle again - when last I checked it it was only to find out who we were brigaded with.  That should tell us who else was there.

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Brett

It doesn't look as if there were any recreated Hanoverian units at the battle this time.  Here is the British order of battle, as listed in the Napoleonic Association's June 2015 newsletter: http://www.napoleonicassociation.org/downloads/adjutant/Summer2015.pdf   The only German units I can see are Brandenburgers and Brunswickers but it's possible there was a battery tucked away in the artillery brigade.  I'm surprised, frankly, that no one in the UK is portraying the King's German Legion, but if they are they do not seem to have made the trip to Belgium.

OTOH, here is a link to a new monument to the Hanoverians, dedicated by 'The Officers of theKGL", whatever that means and officially unveiled quite recently:

http://napoleon-monuments.eu/Napoleon1er/20150424BrunswHan.htm#Han

.

Peter

.

 

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Peter - very pleased to hear that you returned safely from the expedition.   I would have replied earlier but have been very unwell myself.   Have you fully recovered from the food poisoning  ?   It is always a problem where catering is on a mass scale and food sits around.   Your

photos  are splendid and with Saxcob's give a good series on the formations.     I think we are all hoping that you will find time to write a full description of the events and explain the movements of troops that we can see in the pictures.    Did you manage to distribute any of our cards   ?    Any you have left share with Brian and Frank  -  between you we should find some more members.   Anyway well done  -  I'm sure you and your Wife found it an unforgettable experience.    Mervyn 

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Peter

Thank you again for taking the trouble to answer my earlier enquiry, and for providing the links to the 'order of battle' and the dedication of the new monument to the Hanoverians.  I have discovered that there were many Hanoverians in the King's German Legion, so the KGL is another unit for me to investigate.  Interestingly, I found that in the 200 years since the Battle of Waterloo, there has been only one controlled excavation of the grave of a casualty on the battlefield itself.  This rare find was identified as a Hanoverian, Friedrich Brandt, who was serving in the KGL at that time.

I am sorry that the discovery of my mother's ancestors did not take place much earlier in my life.  There is so much to learn!

Regards

Brett

PS  Mervyn, I was sorry to read that you have been unwell.  I hope that you are now fully recovered.

 

 

 

 

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I also had the honour to be a part of these reenactment, I and my father were a part of Czech grup Gardecorps as the French young guard. As i usually reenact 1900-1950 era these was an amazing event, new tactic, new war doctrine, new commands... you can not describe the filing of march in a group, cavalry charges and musket fire... once in a lifetime event...

Here is a short video i made with pictures i was able to take between the battle.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jOVMkNePV4

 

also few pictures, Emperor before the battle, cavalry fight between france and the allies, attack on our square and me and my father known as Bovec1313 here on the forum.

20150619_200022_1280x720.thumb.jpg.da93620150619_204948_1280x720.thumb.jpg.dd01320150620_203414_1280x720.thumb.jpg.4518cRupnik-2-set-156_1067x800.thumb.jpg.a323

Edited by eatmeat

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'Eameat'     .   Welcome to GMIC and our thanks to you - and your Father - for adding the video footage.   A fantastic event - and one that will be remembered for years to come.

Mervyn

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Brett - not sure about the hanoverians, but I suspect yes.  There were all sorts of Allied units including a Swedish regiment - mostly composed of Finns in fact - in one of the Allied Brigades.  The North American Battalion, of which I had the honour to be an staff officer, was attached to the british 4th Brigade, which also had an attached BBC camerman, so an inordinate number of the shots aired on the BBC in fact showed Canadians, as well as the 2/95th Rifles, the 33rd Foot and the Coldstream Guards, who were brigaded with us.  As we also had the only Corps of Drums in the Allied force, they got their share of publcity as well and were employed virtually non-stop, both on and off the field.  Sadly, while I was present for the Friday night battle, I went down with food poisioning immediately afterwards and spent 24 hours sleeping, including through the Saturday battle.  A few phots attached below.   One of our officers and his son, the staff officers inside Hougomont Farm, where we were trapped for an hour by a broken ramp onto the filed, hand to hand combat, His grace the Duke and our Brigade commander, Rob Yuill, with his sone and his father [76] who here portrays their ancestor, a soldier of the Royal Scots.  He fell in with the RS in our battalion for the raining sesions.

Charlie.jpg

DSC00334.JPG

hand to hand.jpg

rearing horse.jpg

Wellington-sunday_3348527k.jpg

Yuills 3 generations.jpg

Some fine images, peter, particularly of 'The Duke' on his rearing horse. I was curious. Who are those fine fellows (third from top) in bearskin caps with blue and white feathers, red coats  and white pantaloons, attacking the British square?

The second to last picture shows Ensign Charles Ewart of the Royal North British Dragoons (Scots Greys) presenting the regimental eagle of the 45e Régiment de Ligne (45th Regiment of the Line) he captured.

It looks like that wounded infantryman is trying to steal the cavalry's  thunder! I believe Charles Ewart, a Sergeant in the 2nd RNB Dragoons at the time of the battle, was commissioned after the war in recognition of his capture of the Eagle at Waterloo.

 

Here is a brief BBC news item on a recent exhibition at Edinburgh Castle
 

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Sorry, the URL wouldn't load.  21st century- tsuh!

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The joke while we were there was that all 6 of the Greys troopers hoped to be 'Sergeant / Ensign Ewart' by the end of the event.  Not sure which, if any of them, was chosen.  I saw some photos on another site of the 'French eagle' being landed in England and transported through London in a carriage, but it looked as if the escort were all gilded staff wallahs.  I suspect Sgt Ewart got a hearty handshake, extra grog, and a 'Well done, that man!' before going back to the troop lines to groom his horse and polish his tack!   The commission came along later.

 

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 I suspect few besides the First Guards received an immediate 'brevet'. Ewart had to wait nine months.

Horse Guards, 9th March, 1816. Major General Sir Henry Torrens, presents his compliments to Sir John Sinclair, and has the honour to acquaint him, by direction of the Commander-in-Chief, that his  Royal Highness the Prince Regent has been pleased, in the name, and on the behalf of his  Majesty, to appoint Sergeant Ewart, of the 2nd Dragoons, to an ensigncy in the 3d Royal  Veteran Battalion."—

 

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"Some fine images, peter, particularly of 'The Duke' on his rearing horse. I was curious. Who are those fine fellows (third from top) in bearskin caps with blue and white feathers, red coats  and white pantaloons, attacking the British square?"

I believe they are Dutch infantry, but not with my brigade so I'm not sure exactly which regiment.

Peter

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"Some fine images, peter, particularly of 'The Duke' on his rearing horse. I was curious. Who are those fine fellows (third from top) in bearskin caps with blue and white feathers, red coats  and white pantaloons, attacking the British square?"

I believe they are Dutch infantry, but not with my brigade so I'm not sure exactly which regiment.

Peter

They were on the Franch side, Denmark infantry, i dont think any Denmark troops were at Waterloo in 1815, but they were allies. Whan i was talking with them they, sead they were from Trondheim and traveled 3 day with bus to get to Waterloo

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Thank you for the information, Eatmeat.  I certainly would not have guessed Danish, as I believe you are right that there were no Dabes there in 1815.

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