Jump to content
Gentleman's Military Interest Club

Recommended Posts

Here is my 1928 dated Australian slouch hat, part of a complete uniform from a private Australian military museum in the 1980s.

 

IMG_1410.JPG

IMG_1411.JPG

IMG_1412.JPG

IMG_1413.JPG

IMG_1416.JPG

IMG_1415.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen this stunning slouchie before, such a real beauty.

 

As regards SA slouch hats, they did have some very similar to the Aussie and British version during WWII.  I have seen them for sale, though I don't have one.  The pics have been borrowed from a dealers site.

 

 

sa slouch hat 1.jpg

sa slouch hat 2.jpg

sa slouch hat 3.jpg

sa slouch hat 4.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the photos! I had thought that I had seen SA slouch hats. I just was not sure of the period. Thanks for clearing that up.

Chip

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

G'day,

Museum quality hats always lack the authenticity of the soldier's ability to flatten the bash to suit his own likes - within the dress regs.  I always pulled the front and back of mine down and squared off the ends as that was how we were told to 'change' it by our recruit instructor to suit the fashion of his battalion.

It also displays the changed pugaree with the folded edges that was gradually used to replace the flat felt one used at the beginning of the war.  I have not really been able to chart the changes but older versions have less folds than the more modern. 

More importantly, the image seems to be showing a modern cast replica badge with press studs. The badge I was originally issued had two slip pins (?) which we lost and replaced with match sticks.

Interestingly enough when the AIF landed at Gallipoli all of its badges were blackened to hide the identity of the unit and to reduce shine.  By 1917 AIF units on the Western Front had unblackened bronze because they wanted the Germans to know that it was Aussies on the other side - apparently it did help create a sense of fear amongst the Germans.

Find attached a Somme Battle relic bought by my son for my 60th.   

Rising Sun - Somme.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I always pulled the front and back of mine down and squared off the ends as that was how we were told to 'change' it by our recruit instructor to suit the fashion of his battalion.

I am having a bit of difficulty visualising this, AussieSoldier. Do you have a photo of this style (with face pixellated, of course) you could show us, please?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello aussiesoldier,

If your comments were in regard to my hat, I can tell you that the blackened badge is a lug back type, not a modern cast version with press-studs. I don't know what pugaree was being worn in 1928, so I can't really comment. I wish the cap had come with the WWI type issue felt band, but once again, I don't know if they were still being issued in 1928.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trooper D,

Happy to comply.  My last slouch, not worn a great deal because I became a Cadet Corps Officer - turned to the dark side.

The slouch fills out a little and sits higher on the head. Never got pulled up for it as long as it sloped to the front and side. I always kept a standard slouch for formal parades so that it sat more distinctly upon the head and stayed there in heavier winds.

It is badged and displayed as a 12 ALH regiment slouch with original style pugaree in honour of the 12th Australian Light Horse Regiment (4th Brigade)and its charge at Beer Sheva.  I work at a Jewish College and my late 2017 focus for commemoration is that charge.

Hope this helps,

George

 

 

 

 

slouch 1.jpg

Slouch 2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is my intention to submit an article that outlines my endeavours to create an ANZAC Spirit in a multicultural migrant school.  That talks of the past and of my future plans.  Keep an eye out for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is my intention to submit an article that outlines my endeavours to create an ANZAC Spirit in a multicultural migrant school.  That talks of the past and of my future plans.  Keep an eye out for it.

A highly admirable enterprise - I look forward to reading more, as and when.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris,

Did some South African units wear them too?

Inspectors and above in the Northern Rhodesia Police Mobile Unit wore these although with a dark blue pugaree.Brim turned upon the left ( as worn) and secured by cap badge,patent leather chin-strap fitted.I believe they were sourced from the UK ( the hats that is - the Inspectors came from all over ).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/30/2015, 4:32:10, Chip said:

Hello aussiesoldier,

If your comments were in regard to my hat, I can tell you that the blackened badge is a lug back type, not a modern cast version with press-studs. I don't know what pugaree was being worn in 1928, so I can't really comment. I wish the cap had come with the WWI type issue felt band, but once again, I don't know if they were still being issued in 1928.

From what I have seen, there was quite a number of variations of pug being worn during WWII.  Early war some had the WWI type but most had one of a number of multi fold types, which became thinner as the war progressed though they start to become thicker gain towards the wars end as the worries about the Japanese were lessened,

 

Here is one of mine, 1943 dated with the pug band sewn to it, very thin economy version.

s 1.JPG

s 2.JPG

s 3.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎01‎/‎10‎/‎2015 at 12:31, aussiesoldier said:

It is my intention to submit an article that outlines my endeavours to create an ANZAC Spirit in a multicultural migrant school.  That talks of the past and of my future plans.  Keep an eye out for it.

Given that the Light Horse's victory at Beersheba led to the Allied capture of Jerusalem, your endeavours at a Jewish College seem even more poignant. I have often cited that particular battle as one of my inspirations to join the armed forces.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanx.  I am using this year's major occasions to cover the year of the Light Horse. Anzac Day Service is an overview of my personal hero of WW1, Lt Gen Harry Chauvel and the Light Horse. We will commemorate the charge in October and I have the grandson of Trooper Ernst Pauls (12th ALH Regt and in the charge!) as a video guest - he will be in Israel - he will use extracts from the diary to fill out the history. Dec 9 is Hannukah and the date lines up with the liberation of Jerusalem and the celebration of the Maccabees' victory. 

I am also covering Bullecourt, Gaza, Hazelbrook from WW1 and the 75th anniversaries of the Fall of Singapore and the bombing of Darwin, the attack on Sydney Harbour (May) and the Kokoda Campaign (August).  A very busy schedule.

Next year is even bigger.

Edited by aussiesoldier
words missing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sir Harry certainly stands among the greatest Australian generals - shoulder-to-shoulder with Monash. I seem to remember an excellent exhibit of Chauvel's uniforms (service dress and general officer's scarlet ceremonial jacket), at the AWM in Canberra.

Yes, you certainly have plenty to work with this year and next.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×