Jump to content
Gentleman's Military Interest Club
ww1buff

Belgian WWI Croix de Guerre Questions

Recommended Posts

Hi folks,

Three questions about the Belgian Croix de Guerre awarded during WWI to foreigners.

Did the Croix de Guerre accompany awards of the national orders (Ordre de Leopold, Ordre de la Couronne, Ordre de Leopold II)?  It was common with French awards of the Legion d'Honneur to Americans that the LdH was accompanied by the French Croix de Guerre with Palm when the LdH was presented for combat duty or gallantry in action.  This practice also seems to have been followed for the Medaille Militaire as well for American recipients.  I have not seen a similar practice with Belgian awards yet in my research, and have found only a few examples of Americans receiving a Belgian national order and the Belgian CdG.

I have some photos in my collection of Belgian soldiers wearing the CdG with no device, with the volunteer emblem, and with palm(s).  Was the palm a separate authorization, or did it depend on the level of the headquarters issuing the award?

Some of the Americans awarded the CdG seem to wear the medal with a palm, but some do not, and the awards lists in A.E.F. unit histories usually do not designate the CdG with Palm.  However, many of the awards (300+) of the CdG to Americans were published in the Belgian Armee Ordre du Jour.  Do these lists in AODJ, originating at Army-level, confer the palm with the CdG?

 Many thanks,

ww1buff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am guessing (for the French) that the CdG would have to accompany the LdH for the simple reason that the first step after the act of bravery is to cite the soldier for his bravery. That would mean the soldier had the CdG right off the bat. Without a citation for Bravery no LdH and the citation would have meant an automatic CdG ?

 

All the best

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris,

Thanks for the reply.

As far as awards to Americans go, a good many French LdH awards were to senior U.S. officers who did not see any direct combat action.  Some were in staff positions, and some never left the U.S. These officers usually did not receive the CdG.  Of the senior officers who did receive the CdG along with the LdH, most appear to be for long service commanding their units rather than any specific act of bravery.  Most of the Belgian awards of national orders also seem to be for this type of service rather than for acts of bravery..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone else want to wigh in on this?

 

Thanks,

 

ww1buff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×