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According to Cardinale, the Vatican abolished the Jerusalem Pilgrim's Cross [position 5 above] in 1977.  

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If the the 'University of Wikipedia' is to be believed, the cross still seems to be awarded.  Again according to the same source, this time in German; "In Deutschland dürfen Bundeswehrsoldaten seit 1955 das Jerusalem-Pilgerkreuz als Bandschnalle an der Uniform tragen.[2]"  ( In Germany,since 1955, Bundeswehr soldiers may wear the Jerusalen Pilgrims Cross as a ribbon on uniform).

The other two non-German medals on the bar are: Austrian Red Cross Service/Merit medal (silver) and the Dutch 4 Day March Medal (1st award)

Edited by ÖSTA

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ÖSTA may be correct in citing 'University of Wikipedia' comment on Pilgrim's Cross continuance.

First, here's my reply to GMIC post "Ribbon bar with unknown ribbon - Turkish?
Started by webr55, November 29, 2007"   Our dear friend Rick Research identified the 'unknown ribbon' as representing the Holy Land Pilgrim's Cross. 


December 1, 2007 about 10 a.m.  GMT

As Rick notes, this Pilgrims' Cross existed in this form from 1901 through "reforms" of the 1980s. From the inception, the grade depended on the number of pilgrimages to the Holy Land or the amount of "DONATIONS" contributed. In 1975, for example, the gold class recognized ten or more visits, silver 5-9 and bronze 1-4. "Donations" at that time were US$5 for bronze, $25 for silver and $50 for gold (silver gilt)---don't see how insignia costs were paid at those prices, let alone a significant "donation". {Guess the numbers had not been adjusted for years somewhat like the Japanese Red Cross criteria!} Sometime in the 1930s the "Jerusalem" bar illustrated signified a "special" award (no specific number of visits or contribution amount) but following WW 2 that bar was also presented to non-Catholics granted the honor. Apparently due to misunderstandings on the part of the Italian insignia supplier, the bar accompanied just about ALL awards after about 1960.  {Added 2016 -- Crosses made in France, Spain or Austria usually do not have the bar.}

Because the award was presented under delegated authority of the "Custos" of the Holy Places or Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem--usually a Dominican also involved in the Papal Order of the Holy Sepulchre, French awardees, among others, could not apply for permission to wear it until the post WW II 4th republic.

 

December 1, 2007 about 3 p.m. GMT

Rick shamed me into digging into Peter Bander van Duren's 1985 revision of Cardinale's, Orders of Knighthood, Awards and the Holy See. Pp 111-112 fully describes the cross and notes that it is an award instituted by the Papacy but not conferred by the Holy See, as bestowal was delegated to the Custos of the Holy Land. "These marks of distinction cannot therefore be qualified as pontifical."

However, van Duren's 1987 work, The Cross on the Sword , states [p. 139 & 156-7] that the Holy Land Pilgrim's Cross was replaced with two new awards around 1977. {N.B. I have seen a Pilgrim's Cross document dated 1981} These are the Palm of Jerusalem [conferred by the Grand Master of the Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem in 3 classes for 'special services or charitable work towards the Order'] and the Pilgrim's Shell [awarded by the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem (CUSTOS) and the Grand Prior of Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem on behalf of the Grand Master to members of the Order who make a pilgrimage to Jerusalem].

Unless there are subsequent changes, the Palm of Jerusalem award is mainly for, and the Pilgrim's Shell exclusively for, members of the Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem.

 

Within the past day, I learned of a document for a Holy Land Pilgrim's Cross, in bronze, dated July 2001! While van Duren cites only a general regulation regarding distinctions [which I cannot locate], perhaps he is wrong in stating that the Palm and Shell awards replaced this decoration.  While it may be possible that someone simply 'completed' blanko bestowal documents and dated them in 1981 and 2001, http://www.custodia.org/default.asp?id=1163 seems to indicate that the cross continues to be available. I sent an inquiry to the Custos' office to confirm this and will share the response.  I asked about the 'Jerusalem" bar significance as well.   

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Thank you, my pleasure,  I omitted images of the Cross so here are examples of all 3 grades.   Also, a 2nd class [silver] with 'Jerusalem' bar and reverse of same: 

1900jerusal.gif

Silver PC with bar.jpg

crs rev.jpg

Edited by 922F
add image

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It is interesting that the German government allowed for these "paid for" medals to be worn on the uniform.  They are pretty cool though!  Here are my BW medal bars. 

BWMedals.jpg

 

BWFrancoGerman1.jpg

BWFrancoGerman.jpg

And this one.  

German.jpg

Named Medal Set 1.jpg

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Hi Paul,

I don't see there "paid for" medals. All three medals had been officially instituted (gestiftet) and awarded, each with an award document. Only collectors have to pay for it.

Uwe

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Hi Uwe,

I was referring to the Jerusalem Cross.  If I was reading the entry correctly, they are awarded in three classes, based upon donation amounts. (paid for).   Here, we are not allowed to wear donation/religious awards on our military medal bars and uniforms. 

Regards

Paul

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Hi Paul,

OK. But the Jerusalem Pilgrim's Cross is also an official (Vatican) decoration, number 8 in the decsending order. The payment is a donation, and you must have made one (or more for silver and gold) pilgrimage to Jerusalem.

My information is, that this cross is allowed to wear for Bundeswehr soldiers.

Uwe

Edited by speedytop

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Here is a pic of my group that includes the Holy Land Pilgrim’s Cross (bronze) which I was awarded whilst working on a European Commission consultancy assignment on the West Bank. My certificate is numbered 215/13, dated 6 December 2013, which suggests that a relatively small number of awards are made despite the many large groups of people that make the pilgrimage in these days of cheap air fares. I have not mounted the ‘Jerusalem’ top suspender bar. This modern cross is smaller and lighter than the three older crosses that I've collected over the years - the gold and silver examples are marked 18 carat and 935 respectively and none has a Jerusalem top bar. The donations specified for obtaining the bronze, silver and gold crosses are $150, $200 and $250 respectively. The wording of the Papal Decree instituting the Holy Land Pilgrim's Cross and an explanation by the Custodian of the meaning of this decoration in the 21st century are set out on the Franciscan Holy Land website at http://www.custodia.org/default.asp?id=1165. Although this addition to my group probably contravenes the UK conditions for wearing awards, I have mounted it after my approved foreign awards as it appears to be fairly common practice these days for British subjects to wear Papal orders and decorations.

Here are my medals, including the bronze Holy Land Pilgrims Cross

ajbmedals-DSC_0834 - Copy (2).jpg

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