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ilieff

King Ferdinand I's decorations

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37 minutes ago, 922F said:

Some sources report that about 150 bronze, 30 silver and 5 gold Princess Clementine 80th Jubilee Decorations were awarded; believe that the actual numbers are somewhat higher.   Cast 80%+ pure silver copies, at least, exist.  First saw these in Sofia about 1997-98 so they have some patina by now.  Would suspect that some of these were gilded as well.   These copies usually sport the ‘alternate’ ribbon [Romanoff, 1991 & others] shown below--maybe fakers had surplus Order of the Star of Anjouan ribbon?     

ClemALTrib.gif   

 

Ilieff--What is the Schalafoff  book with images of these groups and where are copies available?

Hi 922F

Nice to hear from you. Appreciate giving me a figure on the amount awarded & as you say there could be more, left over as well too. Did I understand there are two type of copies?  Are they crude or very dangerous to even a collector. Could you tell by a scan?  It seems the odds are against me even with correct ribbon.  I too would like to get a copy of that book for the bars alone would be worth it. Maybe contains more bars. I suspect Ferdinand had dozens of bars over the years and now wonder if the others have such unique combinations such as the two shown. First to ever see a Southern Cross1st type on a mounted bar. Thanks

 

Sincerely

Yankee

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Hi B,  Happy to hear from you!   I know of only one copy variety or type.  As I saw them [maybe 4-5 examples], they probably would be easily discernable as copies due to 'muddy' details, casting marks around edge and typical 'pinprick' surface pitting often seen with cast copies.  However, they were better than 80% silver in metal content, maybe 925.   Most were on a Star of Anjouan type ribbon but one had a 'correct' ribbon albeit with wider black stripes than what appears on the Ferdinand bar.   Ribbons appeared to be silk.  As to sales outside of Sofia, one sold via eBay a couple of years ago & one in an FJP auction [both noted as copies] 5 or 6 years ago for $100.   At those prices, guess not meant to deceive.  Cheers, E

 

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3 hours ago, 922F said:

Hi B,  Happy to hear from you!   I know of only one copy variety or type.  As I saw them [maybe 4-5 examples], they probably would be easily discernable as copies due to 'muddy' details, casting marks around edge and typical 'pinprick' surface pitting often seen with cast copies.  However, they were better than 80% silver in metal content, maybe 925.   Most were on a Star of Anjouan type ribbon but one had a 'correct' ribbon albeit with wider black stripes than what appears on the Ferdinand bar.   Ribbons appeared to be silk.  As to sales outside of Sofia, one sold via eBay a couple of years ago & one in an FJP auction [both noted as copies] 5 or 6 years ago for $100.   At those prices, guess not meant to deceive.  Cheers, E

 

 

 

HI E

That is really great news. Certainly don't want copies floating around that can fool anybody. At post 34 is Ferdinand wearing a bar that looks very close to the first bar shown by ilieff. Perhaps it is the same bar and somebody tried to restore it.  It seems some ribbons and decorations had been added on at a later date.  Why go through the trouble of extending it and why stick a mini on it.  As the second bar looks much better put together as it should be. Thanks B

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Hi all,

Schalafoff's book about Tzar Ferdinand was published in 2010. It's a high quality bilingual issue, half of which is a side-by-side text in Bulgarian and English, while the other half is full of photographs and various artefacts of the King's life. Unfortunately, there are no other bars shown, but there are numerous other decorations shown (probably few of them which have not been auctioned and are still part of King Simeon's collection). ISBN is 9789549112184 and an image of the front page provided below. If you need any more info, let me know.

As for the faked medals - I have not seen any, though it's highly possible as I can see that fakers have turned their attention to medals and badges too. Below are a couple of images taken from a Russian website. It's a bronze medal in a very poor condition and, what it appears to be, a new ribbon. This might well be a cast-made example due to the lack of details.

Lastly, the ribbon. For me, it makes more sense for the ribbon to be light blue with yellow stripes (though, different sources state different number of stripes). This is to do with the Princess' dynastical background whose colours are blue and gold. My theory is that the ribbon may have been changed to black with blue edging after Her death in 1907.

 

Everyone, sorry for the off-topic going on.

 

img_7253.jpg

img_7252.jpg

res_d5be9e6e447a88fcefe77882f53292e3_450x450_9sei.jpg

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Back again--    Should this be a new thread???

Thank you Ilieff for the book referral!  

Your suggestion regarding ribbon color changes may make sense.  When seen in contemporary black/white photos, the ribbon appears to have a stripe at the edges but with color shift who can say what the actual colors are?  I have never seen the documents instituting this award or possible amendments though Pavlov and Petrov provide references.  One would think that original sources, as amended if applicable, would easily resolve this matter!

 

Rainy afternoon inspired bit of research in published works regarding the Princess Clementine 80th Jubilee Decoration.   It is classed as a decoration not a medal according to all 'authorities'.  

Romanoff's The orders, medals, and history of the Kingdom of Bulgaria, 1982, p. 165 describes the award.  He says presented to Household members, suggesting distinguished foreigners as well.   Romanoff does not mention 'Princess Clementine's Own' 9th Plovdiv Infantry Regiment as eligible. No specification to metal or class; ribbon blue with yellow edges.

Petrov's Bulgarian Orders and Medals, 1998, p. 138 describes the award in 3 classes and pictures a ribbon similar to that of the Star of Anjouan.  He says presented to 9th Plovdiv Infantry Regiment [Honorary Colonel--Princess Clementine] serving members; gold medals to staff/senior officers, silver medals for junior officers [up to and including captain] and bronze to NCOs and enlisted men.  No mention of Household members or distinguished foreigners.  

Denkov's Bulgarian Orders and Medals, 2001, p. 155 confuses the award with non-official Princess Clementine commemorative medals issued in 1899.  No ribbon description.

Pavlov's Bulgarian Orders and Medals, 2002, p. 257 describes the award in 3 classes and pictures a dark blue ribbon with relatively wide black edges.  He says presented to 9th Plovdiv Infantry Regiment [Honorary Colonel--Princess Clementine] serving members with gold medals to staff/senior officers, silver medals for junior officers [up to and including captain] and bronze to NCOs and enlisted men.  Inter alia, household members or distinguished foreigners may have gotten this award {in grade according to social standing.].  

Petrov's Bulgarian Orders and Medals, 2005, p. 147 reports the award in 3 classes and pictures a dark blue ribbon with relatively narrow black edges.  He says presented to 9th Plovdiv Infantry Regiment [Honorary Colonel--Princess Clementine] serving members with gold medals to staff/senior officers, silver medals for junior officers [up to and including captain] and bronze to NCOs and enlisted men.   Inter alia, household members or distinguished foreigners may have received this award.  

Sources claiming that about 150 bronze, 30 silver and 5 gold Princess Clementine 80th Jubilee Decorations were awarded include speakers at  Bulgarian  [monthly medal] Club meetings in 1980-82 and 1988 plus several dealers lists.  I defer to our Bulgarian friends regarding the number of soldiers actually eligible for the decoration as serving members of the 9th Infantry Regiment.    Would suspect that the medals were struck in whatever round number would accommodate the number of potential awardees plus a few extras.   Would further believe that persons close to Clementine, whether family, friends or servants/associates would receive these.  

Images of a couple of these awards below illustrate ribbon varieties.  Usually these appear with the "K" as obverse.  At least one of the silver ones is a copy. One with the darker blue ribbon with yellow side strips purchases as gold [bronze gilt] but may be a well preserved bronze one.

clem2 001.jpg

clem 001.jpg

Edited by 922F
spelchek

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1 hour ago, 922F said:

Back again--    Should this be a new thread???

Thank you Ilieff for the book referral!  

Your suggestion regarding ribbon color changes may make sense.  When seen in contemporary black/white photos, the ribbon appears to have a stripe at the edges but with color shift who can say what the actual colors are?  I have never seen the documents instituting this award or possible amendments though Pavlov and Petrov provide references.  One would think that original sources, as amended if applicable, would easily resolve this matter!

 

Rainy afternoon inspired bit of research in published works regarding the Princess Clementine 80th Jubilee Decoration.   It is classed as a decoration not a medal according to all 'authorities'.  

Romanoff's The orders, medals, and history of the Kingdom of Bulgaria, 1982, p. 165 describes the award.  He says presented to Household members, suggesting distinguished foreigners as well.   Romanoff does not mention 'Princess Clementine's Own' 9th Plovdiv Infantry Regiment as eligible. No specification to metal or class; ribbon blue with yellow edges.

Petrov's Bulgarian Orders and Medals, 1998, p. 138 describes the award in 3 classes and pictures a ribbon similar to that of the Star of Anjouan.  He says presented to 9th Plovdiv Infantry Regiment [Honorary Colonel--Princess Clementine] serving members; gold medals to staff/senior officers, silver medals for junior officers [up to and including captain] and bronze to NCOs and enlisted men.  No mention of Household members or distinguished foreigners.  

Denkov's Bulgarian Orders and Medals, 2001, p. 155 confuses the award with non-official Princess Clementine commemorative medals issued in 1899.  No ribbon description.

Pavlov's Bulgarian Orders and Medals, 2002, p. 257 describes the award in 3 classes and pictures a dark blue ribbon with relatively wide black edges.  He says presented to 9th Plovdiv Infantry Regiment [Honorary Colonel--Princess Clementine] serving members with gold medals to staff/senior officers, silver medals for junior officers [up to and including captain] and bronze to NCOs and enlisted men.  Inter alia, household members or distinguished foreigners may have gotten this award {in grade according to social standing.].  

Petrov's Bulgarian Orders and Medals, 2005, p. 147 reports the award in 3 classes and pictures a dark blue ribbon with relatively narrow black edges.  He says presented to 9th Plovdiv Infantry Regiment [Honorary Colonel--Princess Clementine] serving members with gold medals to staff/senior officers, silver medals for junior officers [up to and including captain] and bronze to NCOs and enlisted men.   Inter alia, household members or distinguished foreigners may have received this award.  

Sources claiming that about 150 bronze, 30 silver and 5 gold Princess Clementine 80th Jubilee Decorations were awarded include speakers at  Bulgarian  [monthly medal] Club meetings in 1980-82 and 1988 plus several dealers lists.  I defer to our Bulgarian friends regarding the number of soldiers actually eligible for the decoration as serving members of the 9th Infantry Regiment.    Would suspect that the medals were struck in whatever round number would accommodate the number of potential awardees plus a few extras.   Would further believe that persons close to Clementine, whether family, friends or servants/associates would receive these.  

Images of a couple of these awards below illustrate ribbon varieties.  Usually these appear with the "K" as obverse.  At least one of the silver ones is a copy. One with the darker blue ribbon with yellow side strips purchases as gold [bronze gilt] but may be a well preserved bronze one.

clem2 001.jpg

clem 001.jpg

Hi Ilieff Thanks for informing me about the other type of ribbon.  Always assumed it was black with blue stripes.Sounds logical that the King would order the change of color after the death of his Mother. Thanks for putting a fake up for all to see. Will scan one before it had that Franenstein operation.

Hi E appreciate you taking the time in describing what the authors had to say about the creation of the decoration. Certainly are two different opinions out there.  Since some authors believed it was given to the 9th IR and about 150 in bronze to the NCO & lower ranks would suffice but surely a Bulgarian IR would have more than 150 NCO & enlisted men, thinking more like 600. The 30 to officers would be more in line. Just don't think one silver to every five bronze is the correct ratio. Perhaps one officer to every 15 or 20 enlisted would make sense unless it was strictly a household medal and would explain only 150 given. Thanks for the fotos. All you need now is the solid gold one. 

Thanks

B

 

img245.jpg

img246.jpg

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12 hours ago, 922F said:

Just reviewed Wikipedia's article regarding Ferdinand's awards and note;

Foreign honours

Surely this is incorrect..........

I agree. They are using as a reference a photo of the King which I posted earlier - wearing a Hungarian hussar outfit with His highest Austro-Hungarian awards. Wikipedia is wrong about other decorations in that list too.

 

11 hours ago, Yankee said:

Since some authors believed it was given to the 9th IR and about 150 in bronze to the NCO & lower ranks would suffice but surely a Bulgarian IR would have more than 150 NCO & enlisted men, thinking more like 600. The 30 to officers would be more in line. Just don't think one silver to every five bronze is the correct ratio. Perhaps one officer to every 15 or 20 enlisted would make sense unless it was strictly a household medal and would explain only 150 given.

I agree. However, authors do not mention if the decoration was given per capita to all members of the regiment, or, as I assume, to those who have distinguished themselves with a long and faithful service. This would make more sense in regard to the possible ribbon change, because certainly, there would not be that much variance in ribbons if the decoration process was conducted only in 1899.

 

 

Edited by ilieff

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The updated list
 
 
Bulgaria:
- Order of SS Cyril and Methodius
- Military Order "For Bravery"
- Royal Order of St. Alexander
- Order of Civil Merit
- Order of Military Merit
 
German Empire
- Order of the Black eagle - Grand Cross
- Order of the Red Eagle - Grand Cross
- Imperial Military order of the Iron cross
- Pour le Merite with oak leaves (Military division)
- Order of Saint John (Ignore Order)
- Saxe-Ernestine House order - Collar and Grand Cross with diamonds
- Order of the Wendish Crown
- Military Merit cross (Mecklenburg)
- Hessen Order of Philip the Magnanimous
- Saxon Military Order of St. Henry
- Oldenburg Friedrich August cross - II class
- Bavarian Order of St Hubert - Grand Cross

Austro-Hungarian Empire
- Order of the Golden Fleece
- Order of St. Stephan - Collar and Grand cross with diamonds
- Military order of Maria Theresia - Grand cross
- Military Merit cross with war distinction - I class
- Order of Vitez
 
British Empire
- The Most Honourable Order of the Bath - Collar and Grand Cross
- Royal Victorian Order
 
Russian Empire
- Order of St. Andrew - Collar and Grand Cros
- Order of St. Alexander Nevsky - Grand Cross with diamonds
- Order of the White Eagle - Grand Cross
- Order of St. Vladimir - Grand Cross
- Order of St. Anna
- Order of St. Stanislav
 
France:
- Order of Holy Spirit
- Order of the Legion of Honour - Grand Cross
- Monaco Order of St. Charles - Grand Cross
- Order of The Academic palms - Gold class
 
Ottoman Empire
- High Order of Honour 
- Gallipoli star (Iron Crescent)

Kingdom of Italy
- Order of the Holy Annunciation
- Order of St Maurice and Lazarus
- Constantine Military order of St George - Grand cross
- Order of St Januarius - Grand cross
 
Kingdom of Belgium
- Order of Leopold - Grand Cross
 
Kingdom of Romania
- Order of Carol I - Collar and Grand Cross
 
Kingdom of Portugal
- Military Order of the Tower and the Sword - Collar and Grand Cross
- Order of the Christ and St Benedict of Aviz - Grand Cross
 
Kingdom of Sweden
- Order of the Seraphim
 
Kingdom of Denmark
- Order of the White Elephant
 
Empire of Brazil
- Order of the Rose
- Order of the Southern Cross
 
Principality of Montenegro
- Order of Prince Danilo I - Grand Cross
 
Kingdom of Yugoslavia
- Order of the Cross of Takovo
- Order of the Star of Karađorđe
 
Malta
- Military order of St John of Jerusalem (Maltese order)
 
The Vatican
- Order of Pope Pius IX
 
Persian Empire
- Order of the Aqdas
- Order of the Lion and the Sun - Grand Cross

Medals and other decorations:
- Cross for XX years of faithful service
- Marian Cross of the German Knight Order
- Lippe-Schaumburg Loyal Service Cross

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Additions:

Duchy of Parma [likely as a result of marriage to Princess Maria Luisa of Bourbon-Parma, Princess of Bulgaria] Civil Merit Order of St. Louis Grand Cross.   His Sacred Military Constantinian Order of Saint George [degree unknown] is "Parma Branch' though that difference would not exist when he received the Order.  A few members of the Princely couple's 'inner circle' received grades of these Orders.  

Romania   Medal for the 40th Jubilee of Carol I 1866-1906, Civil

Russia   Neck badge of the (Imperial) Orthodox Palestine Society – Jerusalem and Middle East section

UK   George V coronation medal

Various ex-Simeon auction catalogs offered several of these.  Have 1979 & 1993 compilied lists somewhere still trying to retrieve them; perhaps a couple of additional items thereon. Am sure that images of Ferdinand wearing all but George V coronation medal exist; 

Edited by 922F
spelchek

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Various Ottoman Orders, Including the two royal orders and Imtiaz in silver and gold both with die struck naming, Bokhara, Order of the Crown.

Paul

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17 hours ago, ilieff said:
The updated list
 
 
Bulgaria:
- Order of SS Cyril and Methodius
- Military Order "For Bravery"
- Royal Order of St. Alexander
- Order of Civil Merit
- Order of Military Merit
 
German Empire
- Order of the Black eagle - Grand Cross
- Order of the Red Eagle - Grand Cross
- Imperial Military order of the Iron cross
- Pour le Merite with oak leaves (Military division)
- Order of Saint John (Ignore Order)
- Saxe-Ernestine House order - Collar and Grand Cross with diamonds
- Order of the Wendish Crown
- Military Merit cross (Mecklenburg)
- Hessen Order of Philip the Magnanimous
- Saxon Military Order of St. Henry
- Oldenburg Friedrich August cross - II class
- Bavarian Order of St Hubert - Grand Cross

Austro-Hungarian Empire
- Order of the Golden Fleece
- Order of St. Stephan - Collar and Grand cross with diamonds
- Military order of Maria Theresia - Grand cross
- Military Merit cross with war distinction - I class
- Order of Vitez
 
British Empire
- The Most Honourable Order of the Bath - Collar and Grand Cross
- Royal Victorian Order
 
Russian Empire
- Order of St. Andrew - Collar and Grand Cros
- Order of St. Alexander Nevsky - Grand Cross with diamonds
- Order of the White Eagle - Grand Cross
- Order of St. Vladimir - Grand Cross
- Order of St. Anna
- Order of St. Stanislav
 
France:
- Order of Holy Spirit
- Order of the Legion of Honour - Grand Cross
- Monaco Order of St. Charles - Grand Cross
- Order of The Academic palms - Gold class
 
Ottoman Empire
- High Order of Honour 
- Gallipoli star (Iron Crescent)

Kingdom of Italy
- Order of the Holy Annunciation
- Order of St Maurice and Lazarus
- Constantine Military order of St George - Grand cross
- Order of St Januarius - Grand cross
 
Kingdom of Belgium
- Order of Leopold - Grand Cross
 
Kingdom of Romania
- Order of Carol I - Collar and Grand Cross
 
Kingdom of Portugal
- Military Order of the Tower and the Sword - Collar and Grand Cross
- Order of the Christ and St Benedict of Aviz - Grand Cross
 
Kingdom of Sweden
- Order of the Seraphim
 
Kingdom of Denmark
- Order of the White Elephant
 
Empire of Brazil
- Order of the Rose
- Order of the Southern Cross
 
Principality of Montenegro
- Order of Prince Danilo I - Grand Cross
 
Kingdom of Yugoslavia
- Order of the Cross of Takovo
- Order of the Star of Karađorđe
 
Malta
- Military order of St John of Jerusalem (Maltese order)
 
The Vatican
- Order of Pope Pius IX
 
Persian Empire
- Order of the Aqdas
- Order of the Lion and the Sun - Grand Cross

Medals and other decorations:
- Cross for XX years of faithful service
- Marian Cross of the German Knight Order
- Lippe-Schaumburg Loyal Service Cross

I see both Bulgarian X and XX yr service crosses.

Also, for Montenegro - in addition to Danilo Grand cross there's 5th class on the medal bar. 

Edited by new world

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On ‎22‎/‎11‎/‎2016 at 14:18, Graf said:

Only the Royal Family will know how this Order happened to be among the other ones

The Order of St. Catherine has been presented to Queen Eleonore, Princess Marie-Louise and Princess-mother Clementine. 

Edited by ilieff

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Side notice:

Prince D. Romanov, head of the House of Romanov and author of several books on orders and medals, have passed away on 31st Dec 2016, aged 90.

He was probably one of the few people who, back in the 80s, had access to the full collection of orders and medals of Bulgarian Kings, part of the archive of King Simeon II.

15825884_1857355937819842_5888949387959747977_n.jpg

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May he rest in peace.  Yes, as Paul states, a true gentleman, always quite willing to share information on a multitude of subjects.  

In addition to his many other activities and honors, one of the very few persons decorated by present head of the House of Petrović-Njegoš with the Orders of Petrovic Njegos and Saint Peter of Cetinje upon their restoration as Montenegrian dynastic or House Orders.   His other awards include decorations from Denmark and several former ruling families.

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13 hours ago, 922F said:

May he rest in peace.  Yes, as Paul states, a true gentleman, always quite willing to share information on a multitude of subjects.  

In addition to his many other activities and honors, one of the very few persons decorated by present head of the House of Petrović-Njegoš with the Orders of Petrovic Njegos and Saint Peter of Cetinje upon their restoration as Montenegrian dynastic or House Orders.   His other awards include decorations from Denmark and several former ruling families.

His awards (from Wiki)

National orders and medals

Dynastic orders

Books on awards by D. Romanov:

The Orders, Medals and History of Greece. Balkan Heritage. 1987. ISBN 87-981267-1-7.

The Orders, Medals and History of the Kingdom of Bulgaria. Balkan Heritage. 1982. ISBN 87-981267-0-9.

The Orders, Medals and History of Imperial Russia. Balkan Heritage. 2000. ISBN 87-981267-4-1.

The Orders, Medals and History of the Kingdoms of Serbia and Yugoslavia. Balkan Heritage. 1996. ISBN 87-981267-3-3.

The Orders, Medals, and History of Montenegro. Balkan Heritage. 1988. ISBN 87-981267-2-5.

 

 

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On ‎11‎/‎19‎/‎2016 at 17:56, ilieff said:

Hi all,

I am currently trying to assemble a full list of the decorations received by HM King Ferdinand I of Bulgaria. Unfortunately, my knowledge only covers Bulgarian decorations, so the majority of the 'foreign' ones are very blurry to me.

I'd appreciate your help with identifying more orders/medals which belonged to Him and/or improving the existent info by defining the particular class received.

Regards,

ilieff

 

PS:I've spotted a similar list on Wikipedia.org but I believe it's very inaccurate.

 

 

 

Bulgaria:
- Order of SS Cyril and Methodius
- Military Order "For Bravery"
- Royal Order of St. Alexander
- Order of Civil Metir
- Order of Military Merit
 
German Empire
- Order of the Black eagle
- Order of the Red Eagle
- Imperial Military order of the Iron cross
- Pour le Merite (Military division)
- Order of Saint John (Johanniter Order)
- Saxe-Ernestine House order
- Order of the Wendish Crown
- Military Merit cross (Mecklenburg)

Austro-Hungarian Empire
- Order of the Golden Fleece
- Order of St. Stephan
 
British Empire
- Order of the Bath
- Royal Victorian Order
 
Russian Empire
- Order of St. Andrew
- Order of the White Eagle
- Order of St. Vladimir
- Order of St. Anna
- Order of St. Stanislav
 
France
- Order of the Legion of Honour
 
Ottoman Empire
- Gallipoli star (Iron Crescent)
 
Kingdom of Italy
- Order of the Holy Annunciation
- Order of St Maurice and Lazarus
- Constantine Military order of St George
 
Kingdom of Belgium
- Order of Leopold
 
Kingdom of Portugal
- Order of the Tower and Sword
- Order of Aviz
 
Kingdom of Sweden
- Order of the Seraphim
 
Kingdom of Denmark
- Order of the White Elephant
 
Empire of Brazil
- Order of the Rose
 
Other
- Military order of St John of Jerusalem (Maltese order)
- Order of Pope Pius IX
 
 
 

An image scanned from Schalafoff's book:

King's early bar 

ribbon_ferdinand_2.jpg

And a second scan from that very same album:

Second (later) bar which belonged to the King.

ribbon_ferdinand_1.jpg

The Black and white cross after the Bulgarian 20yr LS Cross for Officers is a teutonic cross called the Marion Cross.

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On 11/19/2016 at 17:56, ilieff said:
Bulgaria:
- Order of SS Cyril and Methodius
- Military Order "For Bravery"
- Royal Order of St. Alexander
- Order of Civil Metir
- Order of Military Merit

 

An image scanned from Schalafoff's book:

King's early bar 

ribbon_ferdinand_2.jpg

And a second scan from that very same album:

Second (later) bar which belonged to the King.

ribbon_ferdinand_1.jpg

I just noticed something interesting: Bravery cross on the 1st medal bar is of early type (19the century), while Bravery on the 2nd bar is from 1915 emission.

I don't think that as a King and supreme commander he was given lowest grade of Bravery during the WWI. Perhaps when they made 2nd bar for him they just used another Bravery which was available at the time. 

What's the story here?

 

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Hi new world,

As the theory goes, since the inception of the Third Kingdom, the Bulgarian Monarch is automatically allocated both 1st and 4th Classes of the Military Order. I am not too sure what's the reason behind it, but I assume it might be just another feature which has been copied over from St.George's Order.

An interesting example of this rule is the fact that Prince Alexander I, during His state visit in Russia, displays the 1st Class of the sole (at that time) Bulgarian order, utilising His position as head of state. Only months later he is officially recognised for His deeds in the Russo-Turkish war (1877-1878) and awarded the 1st class, this time for His merits and not for the position he is currently occupying. It is funny though, as I am thinking The Prince would have had to present the order to Himself. Perhaps he used a mirror.

Next in line, Ferdinand I is often seen (especially in the earlier period of His reign) displaying both the neck order and the 4th class on His chest. It's highly possible that he used several badges and not just one, as is the case with His 1st class badges. He used His position as Monarch to display the Military order, so it might be slightly different to the general rule which applies to generic decorations we all are familiar with.

By the way, the heir to the throne (in this case Boris of Tarnovo) has been given an officer rank since His birth, as some suggest, just to be eligible to be decorated with the 4th Class of the Order "For Bravery". There are several photos of Him as child having the badge on His chest. Surely he could not have possibly earned it on the battlefield at this age.

And later, as King Boris III, He was never seen wearing 1st class, nor Grand cross. He only displayed the 4th class which He has by right and the two grades of the 3rd class He was presented with during the Balkan and Great wars.

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Княз Фердинанд с лентата на ордена "За Храброст", София , 1888 г. 

image.jpeg

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On ‎6‎/‎2‎/‎2017 at 12:14, new world said:

Second (later) bar which belonged to the King.

ribbon_ferdinand_1.jpg

Does anybody know the name of medal #4 (the cross fleury), which is located between the Austrian 60th year Jubilee Cross of 1908 and the Polish Order of the White Eagle?   It looks a bit like the Order of Michael The Brave (3rd class) (which I think Ferdinand was awarded), but that particular order has blue enamel and a crimson ribbon with gold edge stripes. 

Thanks.

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