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Gentleman's Military Interest Club
Asil76

1537 H.A.C. 1897 Silver Gilt medal

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Asil76   

Hi, I came across this little medal which I think is an Anniversary medal I'm not sure what H.A.C stands for I've had a bit of a google and came up with 'Honourable Artillery Company' would this be correct? Firstly I would love to know if this is a genuine medal and also what would have given for? Love to know your thoughts, sorry if I have posted this in the wrong section if I have please could someone guide where I should have posted this? :)

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That's a lovely thing!  A beutiful example of the Victorian jeweller's craft and with a custom woven ribbon, it must have cost a few pence even then.

Presumably private purchase and issued to members of the HAC who were serving on the occasion of the anniversary, or perhaps just for old comrades.  I suspect it wasn't worn in uniform, though I may be wrong - some of the older units such as the HAC 'got away' with things that would drive a modern RSM mad.

Thanks for sharing. 

BTW, this site is interesting if for nothing but the long list of distinguished members of the HAC.  perhaps you can find one who was serving in 1897! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honourable_Artillery_Company

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Asil76   

Thank you Peter for getting in touch so quickly :) So does the H.A.C stand for 'Honourable Artillery Company?' I've not seen one before from my little google search I saw this medal had sold with another long service medal (to an officer) for over £600 I'm guessing that was more to do with the other medal and the officer it pertained to than this lovely little one.  So have know idea of value for this medal like I said I wasn't even sure this was a genuine medal as not seen one before.  Thank you so much for the link I look forward to checking it out :)

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QSAMIKE   

Yes you are correct on the meaning of H.A.C........  The ribbon is their colours and design.......

Mike

 

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Yes, and the HAC claims, with some truth, I think, to be one of the oldest [still active] military units in 'the world'.  In fact, when they were formed in 1637 'artillery' meant anything which flew through the air and the were archers, and have never been Gunners as such.  Their HQ is no the venue for high end parties and such in London. :)

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Asil76   

wow that really interesting :) I would love to know who it belonged to, but I don't think that will be possible, I look at the link you gave Peter but sadly couldn't see anything for 1897 so can't guess at a name ;)

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Asil76   

Hi Trooper_D Thank you for the link, I assume what the medals sold for was more related to the connection to the person and the other medal. I'm just amazed by the craftsmanship in this medal it really is lovely.

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40 minutes ago, Asil76 said:

Hi Trooper_D Thank you for the link, I assume what the medals sold for was more related to the connection to the person and the other medal. I'm just amazed by the craftsmanship in this medal it really is lovely.

I think you are probably right. With so few of these about, it's difficult to get a sense of the value of a single, unattributed medal. However, I don't think that this is a case of rare = valuable :(

But, all that aside, as you and others have remarked, a nice example of craftsmanship.

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That's a lovely pair.  Note that the LSGC has the special ribbon authorized for wear by the HAc and not the usual issue ribbon.  I suspect the pairing is what adds to the value, though I'm no expert, and that either by itself might bring only 25-30% of the estimate.  

Thansk for posting, Troope!

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Asil76   

Yes it is lovely and I won't be planing on selling it anytime soon :) It has been fascinating to find out more about it and the H.A.C.

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It is a pity he did not engrave his name and number on the back then it would have had considerable research potential but still a beautiful medal.

Paul

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Asil76   

Hi Paul, Yes I've had a really good look and no such luck on the name... sadly will never know who it belonged to, but it really is lovely all the same...

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QSAMIKE   

Good Morning Everyone.....

Dug out a book that I have had for a while..... 

THE HISTORIE BOOKE - A TALE OF TWO WORLDS AND FIVE CENTURIES - 1537 / 1638 / 1903

Done to keep in lasting remembrance the joyous meeting of the HONOURABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY of LONDON and the ANCIENT and HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY of the MASSACHUSETTS in the TOWNE OF BOSTON- A.D. 1906

It is a limited edition of 250 books and printed in the US......  One of the nice things is that it gives full nominal rolls of both the London Regiment and the Massachusetts Regiment......

In the book it gives a description of a medal like the one shown but no picture (damn) but not who got them, I am thinking that they may have been given out to senior members / officers of the Massachusetts Company from the London Company.....  The ribbon that is shown in the book attached to a line drawing in gold if of the American Committee of the Hon. Art. Co. 1897 medal is the same as the one shown herein.....

Interesting reading as it gives the full history of the H.A.C. .....

Here is a quote that is interesting:

At last came Yorktown; and soon the great victory -- a victory of both the English people and the American people -- crowned the years of struggle.  June 10, 1783, the last General of the Day in the American Army of the Revolution inspected, turned off, and visited the guards.  By a remarkable chance, if nothing more, he was the same officer by whos orders, on the evening of the fight at Lexington, the first guard of the army has been mounted at the foot of Prospect Hill.  His name was Major-General Heath; and he also stands upon the long roll of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company.

Mike

 

 

 

 

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Asil76   

Hi Mike

Thank you for the information, its such a shame there is no name or number on the medal as would have loved to have researched who it belonged to. The craftsmanship is to a very high standard so I think you are right that it would have been to officers / senior members. 

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