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Gentleman's Military Interest Club
Alex K

Japanese regalia

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Hi all, a quick question if I may, I recently came across this image of Admiral Inoue Yoshika, my question is he seems to be holding something which appears to resemble a duck (I suspect it isn't)in his right hand, exactly what is it, my knowledge of Imperial Japanese regalia is limited but I'm willing to learn, any help appreciated

 

regards

 

Alex K

Admiral Viscount Inoue Yos800.JPG

duck copy.JPG

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In Japan the pheasant is a divine messenger for Amaterasu, the great sun goddess.  Amaterasu is a focal point of the Shinto pantheon.  She is the ruler of the heavens, so her association with the pheasant made this creature an important symbol of power, abundance and promise.

Me thinks so. :)

Edited by Egorka

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Hi very interesting! and thanks for the response, so I assume that it was a specific part of Japanese symbolism.

 

regards

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I know of 3 symbolic birds in Japanese culture: a crane, a pheasant, a crow.

It is definitely not a crane. I hope not! Cranes look much different. :)

Could be a three-legged crow (Yatagarasu). But here the most important attribute - three legs - is nowhere in sight.

So I go with duck-looking pheasant. :)

 

 

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Hi Gentlemen, bath duck it is then:D on a serious note, would it be equivalent to a Field Marshal's baton type of thing or did he just like walking round with a duck?

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Well, the list expands. This is not a ducky-pheasant. It is a dove! Unlike European culture, a dove in Japanese traditional culture is a symbol of war, not peace.

A dove (hato) is symbolic animal and messenger of Hachiman - the the syncretic divinity of archery and war and the divine protector of Japan, the Japanese people and the Imperial House, the Minamoto clan ("Genji") and most samurai worshipped him.

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8 hours ago, Egorka said:

Well, the list expands. This is not a ducky-pheasant. It is a dove! Unlike European culture, a dove in Japanese traditional culture is a symbol of war, not peace.

A dove (hato) is symbolic animal and messenger of Hachiman - the the syncretic divinity of archery and war and the divine protector of Japan, the Japanese people and the Imperial House, the Minamoto clan ("Genji") and most samurai worshipped him.

And I thought I'd asked a simple question!!, still,  getting more interesting

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hi Alex,

just saw your thread on the cane admiral Inoue is holding. Egorka is right, it is a dove. This cane with silver dove (hato tsue) was a special Imperial Court distinction, personally bestowed by the Japanese emperor. Perhaps something comparable to the golden key Chamberlains wear on the back of their uniform at European Courts. It was seldom bestowed and unfortunately I have not been able to find out the exact reasons for bestowel. On of the most famous recipients was admiral Togo, and he is often seen in pictures holding it.

This distiction was not limited to the army or navy, also civilians could receive it. Although i have never seen a picture of a fieldmarshall holding it. Prime minister Takahashi Korekyo was, after retirement, one of the cilvilan recipients (see picture).

The well known Japanese medal collector Nakabori describes this hato tsue in one of his order and medal books, but does not mention the reason for bestowal, or the number given. I have enclosed i picture from this book.

Hope this information is of some use, Pieter

P1020890.JPG

P1020889.JPG

P1020888.JPG

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Hi Nick,

thanks for your comment. The text says a.o. that this cane is reserved for distinguished persons of over 80 years old and that the wooden part is made of the mulberry tree, which, according to Japanese belief, protects against cripling in old people.

We me everything is well, only unfortunately too little time to spend on our common hobby, because of grandchildren demanding attention.

Best regards, Pieter

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hi all just another bit of info regarding the hato no tsue its a traditional gift for those over 80 in japan the presentation was first practiced in ancient china and later in japanese courts its seen as an appropriate gift as the characters that make up the word hato(pigeon) can also mean 80 it is also said that pigeons do not choke a serious problem for elderly japanese

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Hi all, thanks for the additional information, didn't realise from the photo I posted that it was a full "Staff" (stick), from the photo it looks white but I assume it would have been silver in reality.

 

regards

 

edit, makes a bit more sense now, with this  picture although he's actually holding it by the head unfortunately

20100705163110b74.jpg

Edited by Alex K

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On 04.03.2017 at 09:38, mickey said:

modern version

05.jpg

Yea, right.

For tea ceremony :lol: 

01.jpg

02.jpg

Edited by JapanX

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