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Hi Gents

please feel free to add your own posts to this thread if you wish as this is the only Canadian awarded medal I have.....

British War Medal awarded to : 602344 SJT. Thomas CMG Brigade....

(I believe he was a Brit btw...)

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Tony

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Mike!

thank you ever so much. Really.

need to take a proper look but did notice this......

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"Index finger missing off right hand"

thanks again

tony 

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Hespeler Ontario is now part of the  Municipality of Cambridge, Ontario, west of Toronto, Ontario.

48% of the CEF were British born and many arrived here in the decae or so before the war as adults.

Two soldiers with adjacent serial numbers, both casualties - 602347 and 602348 - were part of 1st Machine Gun Company, which was a compnoenet of the 1st Cdn Division.  This gent apparently survived the war but if you wish to search the records at Library and Archives Canada you may be able to find when and where he died, as they did keep such records but they are not complete,  depending as they did on others to send in information of vetereans' deaths.

Info on the CMG: http://www.canadiansoldiers.com/corpsbranches/machineguncorps.htm

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On 21/07/2017 at 15:20, peter monahan said:

Hespeler Ontario is now part of the  Municipality of Cambridge, Ontario, west of Toronto, Ontario.

48% of the CEF were British born and many arrived here in the decae or so before the war as adults.

Two soldiers with adjacent serial numbers, both casualties - 602347 and 602348 - were part of 1st Machine Gun Company, which was a compnoenet of the 1st Cdn Division.  This gent apparently survived the war but if you wish to search the records at Library and Archives Canada you may be able to find when and where he died, as they did keep such records but they are not complete,  depending as they did on others to send in information of vetereans' deaths.

Info on the CMG: http://www.canadiansoldiers.com/corpsbranches/machineguncorps.htm

Thanks as always Peter

tony

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While we're on the topic...

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Picked up this Victory Medal issued to 663140 Acting Corporal George Harcourt Burland Bull, Canadian Machine Gun Brigade at a Sunday Antique Market together with some unrelated items. After a bit of research I'm happy to say it's not just a run of the mill Vic - the Orangeville, Ontario man was underage and lied on his Attestation Papers when he enlisted in December 1915 - I found it suspicious that his apparent age was exactly 18 years of age. I found his birth certificate on Ancestry he was actually 16-1/2 years of age on attestation. I wonder if his superiors figured him out as he did not proceed to France until March 1918 after reaching a proper age and served with the CMG Bde for the rest of the war...

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Edited by SemperParatus

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It was not uncommon for boys to be allowed to enlist when the evidence seems clear that they were underage but many were held in Canada or the UK until they were at least 18.  At least in the Cdn forces, under-18s in the trecnches - 19 was the official age' do not appear to ave been that common.

I have records for a Simcoe County boy who enlisted three times before it 'took' and even then his papers say 'Not to proceed overseas [ie: France] until [indecipherable]' and 'Forestry Corps', which was where many under and over age volunteers ended up. In fact, one of his attestaion papers actually has '18' crossed out and '17 years, 9 months' written in, though that was also wrong.  This lad stayed in England until his 'official' 18th birthday, based on his 3rd date of birth, was wounded on Nov. 9th and Died of Wounds Nov. 11, 1918.

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Morning Gents...

Hope you don't mind me straying slightly? Is it within the rules as it's my own post??

Anyway. I recently got a 1943 Admiralty 'booklet' about The Royal Marines... it has a some first hand accounts.

Last paragraph is interesting....

1942!

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Hope you like 

tony

 

PS

just noticed George made a good age. He probably would have 'taken' 1977 back then in France...

 

Edited by Farkas
PS

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"Wow what a story Peter... thamks for sharing. "

He is in the book I self-published this year on the 70 men whose names appear on our local WWI memorials.  After publication his full record became available.  He lasted 4 weeks the first time he enlisted, based on pay records, thrown out on 'medical' grounds - height, I'd guess.  Re-joined the same unit with a new number and lasted 5 weeks.  The third time he travelled 200 miles to join a different unit.  His first enlistment lists a non-exitant home address in Scotland, though he wasfrom Yorkshire, and his 'Next of Kin' was first a landlady then a 'friend', though his mother was alive in England.  Determined little cuss!

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