Jump to content
Gentleman's Military Interest Club

Recommended Posts

Hi,

I was hoping somebody might be able to assist me with some information on Scotland Yard during the 1940's and 1950's period.

I am researching an Inspector Charles James John Law who was promoted to Inspector in 1940 and transferred to the A3 department at Scotland Yard and he remain there until he retired in 1955. This might seem a bit daft but I cannot identify what department A3 refers to....... would that be the fingerprints or photography department or does it refer to the division or something else.

Any help would be much appreciated and I hope I have done this entry properly, as it is now only my second posting on the forum.

many thank.

Alan.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

I just thought I would add some more details on Inspector Charles J. J. Law, in case, it might help in identifying what is the A3 department in Scotland Yard in 1940 or assist in providing any other information on him.

Charles James John Law, born Marylebone, in London, on the 25/6/1902.

Served in the Army between 1921 to 1925. [don't know the actual military details]

Joined the Metropolitan Police in 1925, assigned to 'J' or Bethnal Green division.

Promoted to sergeant and transferred to 'C' or St James's division in 1931.

Promoted to station sergeant and transferred to 'P' or Camberwell division in1937.

Promoted to Inspector and transferred to A3 department at Scotland Yard in 1940.

Retired in 1955, Inspector at Scotland Yard. [I think he was still an Inspector.]

Died on 30/4/1993.

My impression would be that A3 is likely to be a sub-group/section with the main department ie C.I.D. department and A3 could be fingerprint section etc but I just do not know.

regards,

Alan. 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good morning Alan. If you ask the moderators to move your inquiry to the “Mervyn Mitton Police” forum, I’m sure that you will attract the attention of some of the experts who haunt that forum. There is a wealth of historical information within the membership. I’m certain that they will be eager to assist you. Mike. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mike,

           Many thanks for keeping me on the right track and thanks to the moderators for moving the post for me. 

Alan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is just an observation but it always seems funny how it can be so difficult to locate more recent information ie A3 department at Scotland Yard in the 1940's and 1950's and yet when you go back much further, say 130 or 160 years etc, then there can be a mass of information at your fingertips i.e....................

Inspector Charles James John Law's grandfather was :-

 

Inspector John Law, Metropolitan Police.

Born 14/8/1840, Devonshire.

Joined the Metropolitan Police 21/4/1862. PC [H205/collar number] in 'H' or Whitechapel division.

Retired on pension 4/10/1887, Inspector with 'B' or Chelsea [Westminster] division.

John Law was over 5 feet and 9 inches tall.

Dark hair,

Hazel eyes.

Fresh complexion.

Scar on right wrist.

47 years old. [ in 1887].

Maybe this fact, encouraged his grandson, to also join the Metropolitan Police.

Alan.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My May 1929 bible of Scotland Yard identifies 'A' Department was for Administration. A3 covered Promotions & Transfers, Pay Rates, Ceremonials, Special Duties, Medical & Sick, Police Orders. Previously called the Executive Branch A3 was mainly clerical duties, but also included Constables attached to Scotland Yard for special purpose such as motor drivers, and wireless operators. It also included the telegraph office. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Nick,

Many thanks and it all makes sense now because when you think of it..... he was a station sergeant from 1937 to 1940 and station sergeants were responsible for the overall administration of the station. Station sergeants had 4 chevrons, instead of the 3 chevrons identifying a normal sergeant. Although, I cannot remember when the 4 chevrons were dispensed with as a rank marking.

I should have also guessed that the letter 'A' may have been used to indicate administration.

Anyway he spent 15 years in the administration the Metropolitan Police and there would have been hundreds of civilian staff involved in supporting these uniformed staff.

I really do appreciate this information and now I know what he was actually doing at Scotland Yard.

Alan. 

Edited by Alan Baird
grammer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

This is just for general information but it seems there were 2 Inspector Law's serving at New Scotland Yard during this period ie 1940/50's.

The other, ' Inspector Law,' was Detective Inspector Percy Law who was in charge of the Photographic Section, part of the CID, at New Scotland Yard. There was a Metropolitan Police recruitment advertisement in the papers in the 1950's which included a photograph of a plain clothes detective photographing a gun to highlight and record the fingerprints on the pistol. The same picture is on one of the, 'Boy's Annual books,' of that period and that picture is of Percy Law.

Obviously, there would have been a great many people working in New Scotland Yard but who knows, they may have even known each other and I suppose there must have been quite a few famous characters/detectives that were around during this period ie Fabian etc. 

Alan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to see that you were able to complete your research in to what A3 stood for and what your officer was involved in. :thumbup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the thumbs up......and your right, a simple thing like understanding and not guessing, what A3 meant, did help a great deal in finishing my research. The Gentleman's Military Interest Club is a very nice and helpful site....so many thanks. 

It always feel strange when a Metropolitan Policeman who served from the 1920's to 1950's is difficult to research but if you take a Metropolitan Policeman from Victorian times, then you can discover his whole life story ie work, family etc and even complete the research in just a few hours.

Alan.    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan,

The Met is a weird and wonderful organisation, there is often no rhyme or reason as to why some paperwork / records were kept over others. It can be most frustrating, but perseverance is key and you’ve achieved your aim. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×