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Does anyone on here know what a 'Billings Snap pad' was used for. I know it is revolver related but not sure exactly how. 

A photo of it is attached .

Many thanks for any advice , clues etc .... 

 

James 

Billingedit.jpg

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So, a primitive form of safety devce or simply meant to protect the hammer [and presumably the cartridges/cylinder] from wear?

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Back when we were doing small arms training during the mid-last century, the instructors seemed to place a high value on dry firing or snapping in - repeated alignment of the sight picture followed by gradual pressure on the trigger until the hammer released.  Perhaps this device prevented damage from repeated snapping in.  Can't envision how it might have worked.  

 

H

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Also a possbilty, in fact it sounds more likely than my theory.  To quote Artie Shaw from a very old US TV show, 'Veery interestng'.

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I am at a loss with this I must confess. 

But thanks for the response.

 

James

 

 

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I believe as suggested already it was used during dry drills to prevent the hammer from breaking when repeatedly firing when using drill rounds or if the chambers were empty. I think it was a way of saving money by conserving ammunition, and preventing damage to the weapons.

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Can you tell / show us the size of the device?  I'm not aware of us using such a gadget in the US Armed Forces.  

 

Thanks,

Hugh

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The pad is apprx 2.25 inches long by 1.5 in in depth. Very small.

see photos Billings.thumb.jpg.b9a4bf5f6eb99e9ce663823d07983002.jpg

Billingedit.jpg

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Sounds as though it could fit between the hammer and the striking position to absorb the fall.

H

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